Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: HVA action rebuild.

  1. #1
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    364

    Question HVA action rebuild.

    I mentioned in another section but I got a J.C. Higgins model 51 -L Husqvarna action sears roebuck rifle in 270. It needs help. It spent most of its life on board a hand troller and the inside of the barrel looks horrible. I cleaned it up as much as I could. It had green copper growing inside when I got it. And to the naked eye the rifling looks like it is wore out especially at the end of the barrel. Also it has a baked on teflon coating and they coated the bolt and the inside of the action too and its more than sticky when working the bolt. I shot it last year and it was all over the place. This thing is kind of a family relic. It belonged to my dad and his dad. I just cant see throwing it up on the wall for good. What are the options? Can the barrel be refurbished somehow? And can the teflon be removed? Or Do I have to rebarrel it. The stock also has been repaired at the front sling stud. Id like to keep the .270 cal. Can the barrel be saved by reboring to a 7mm or 30 cal. or something like that? If I had to rebarrel it I would most likely go all out do the top of the line barrel mcmillian stock thing and all that. Also what calibers could I apply to the action.

    Thanks Tom.

  2. #2
    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    354

    Default

    If the rifling looks worn near the muzzle of the bbl, it's likely just very, very dirty. Every worn or shot-out bbl I've seen has worn at the throat, not the muzzle. I'd suggest a strong copper solvent like the Tipton's Ultimate and several new nylon brushes. Give it a go and see if the rifling doesn't reappear. As far as the teflon coat, you could try a fine sandblast to remove most of it then finish with steel wool and Kroil. I'd imagine that should make the action significantly cleaner.

    I'm curious what coating they put on the bolt though. Teflon is slick and self lubricating and shouldn't make the action sticky...

    Good luck,

    Adam

  3. #3
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    364

    Default armor coating.

    I think it was actually called armor coating. Im not sure who did the work. It was done a long time ago probably the 80s. Its a bake on type of stuff and its matte black. They put 2 layers on it. The problem is they put it on so thick the bolt binds up if you put any side pressure on the bolt when cycling the bolt it just hangs up. This stuff isnt very slippery. I would rather get it stripped and get it parkerized or blued. Its all scratched up anyways and the barrel is exposed in a few spots. It looks like there is rust or corrosion buildup at both ends and throughout the barrel. Ill give it one more try though. Thanks.

  4. #4
    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    354

    Default

    I think sandblasting should remove the finish with no problems. It doesn't sound like it's chemically bonded to the metal, so it should come right off. If you're serious about re-coating the rifle, you could do a lot worse than getting it Arctic-Coated. I think Gary Junk in Fairbanks is still doing it, and I'm sure there a few folks in the big city doing it as well. If you're willing to spend a little money, the NP3 finish from Robar in Arizona is almost indestructible. Self-lubricating, solvent and scratch resistant, and any color you want. I'd shy away from Parkerizing as it never seems to last very long. Re-bluing is an art, and the money spent isn't always worth the product received.

    If you're desperate to clean the bbl, and the copper solvent doesn't work its magic or the nylon brushes aren't cutting it, you could always resort to a stainless steel brush. I hate using them because they can seriously damage a bore, but if it's already ruined, what's the harm? I would suggest you find a 6.5mm/.264 diameter brush and start with that as it's less likely to actually hurt the bore. If you start to see more rifling, you can go back to a bronze-phosphor or nylon brush of the correct bore diameter to finish up whatever might be left.

    I've always liked Husqvarna rifles, and I think with a little more time and elbow-grease you'll have a gun you can hunt with and pass on to your kids.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In an easy chair in Cyberspace
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    None of the spray on, bake on coatings, no matter what they are called (Bear Cote, Dura Cote, Teflon, Black T, [insert spiffy name here]Cote) are worth anything for hard use except Cerakote, and even then its iffy.

    You might as well save the hype and use Krylon.

  6. #6
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel Nut View Post
    If you're willing to spend a little money, the NP3 finish from Robar in Arizona is almost indestructible. Self-lubricating, solvent and scratch resistant, and any color you want.
    2nd that Robar is tuff! Had a 50bmg come back to the shop I worked for in Phoenix for a bolt alignment problem that was caused by the Robar finish. We were all amazed how hard it was to clearance that stuff just .005 deep, ended up grinding it down.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  7. #7
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    364

    Default well

    It did a great job of protecting the rifle for the 20years it spent on a fishing boat. But they should never have coated the bolt or the inside of the action like they did.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •