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Thread: Want input

  1. #1
    Member mooseeker's Avatar
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    Default Want input

    I would like some in put on camera and lens selection. I am looking at the Nikon D90 over any of the other DSLR's out there for the video option not sure about the Canon 5D MKII? I want to have just two lenses an am in a toss up on long range lens. I would like to be able to take pictures of animals up to 600 yards away. Was looking at the 70-300 but not sure if that will be the right choice also saw the 105-450 but do not like the price tag on that one if I don't need it. Any thoughts would be helpful on what two lenses you would pic and what camera.I know trying to make a still camera be a video camera is not the best way to go but for the now that is my best option.Thank you

  2. #2
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    I shoot a Nikon D300 which has the same chip in it as the D90. Takes pretty good photos. Regarding using the DSLR as a video camera, if you're not planning on serious videography, it can be a good compromise. The only video camera I own is a little Canon S3 point and shoot which has video capture capability. For little memorial video clips like I use it for, it's just fine.

    Regarding you desire to take pictures of stuff out to 600 yards, you should study field of view (FOV) for different lenses a bit. My longest lens is 400mm and I have a 1.4x extender which ultimately yields 550mm. With this combo on the D300/D90 chipset, your field of view at 600 yards will be about 80ft. horizontal. So if you're taking a picture of an 8ft long moose standing broadside to you, 600 yds away, he'll fill 10% of the width of the screen.

    Just make sure you understand what you're getting before you part with your $$$.

  3. #3
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Kinda of nebulous, however, the D90 (MSRP $999) and the 5D MkII (MSRP $2,699) bodies are in two different classes, the 5D being a professional grade (and much more expensive) camera. The Canonites on the site can (and will) extoll the virtues of the 5D, but you're going to spend more than twice the cost of the D90 on the 5D - it's not an apples to apples comparison.

    As for lens selection, the 70-300 is not going to give you the results you might think at 600 yds. Even with the crop factor working for you in the D90, you're going to have to get much closer than 600 yards to have anything appear on the screen in any sizeable fashion. Also, make sure you read up on shooting video with the D90. I believe that you lose autofocus, which can be a pretty big issue (or not, depending on what you're looking for).

    Many of the experienced folks on line here will tell you that bodies are becoming "consumables". Buy one that meets your needs, and invest in good lenses - they will hold their value (and utility) for many years. If HD Video in a dlsr is one of your critical performance requirements, (given what you explained above) I'd look at the D90, along with a short zoom (a Tokina 28-80 f/2.8 is in my bag $~400 used, not available new) and a 70-200 mm f/2.8 lens from either Nikon ($1800 new), Sigma ($800 new), or Tamron ($700 new), coupled with a Nikon 2x TC ($400 new), which effectively turns your 70-200mm f/2.8 into a 140-400mm f/5.6, while still maintaining good image quality. Total outlay would be in the neighborhood of $3,600 for the D90, Tokina lens, Nikon 70-200 with the 2x TC. Mix and match as your budget allows, but it's not an inexpensive hobby. Good luck, spend the money, and have fun!

    R,

    John

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    Member mooseeker's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thank you for you input

  5. #5
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    You would be very happy with either camera, however as has been said 600 yards is not realistic with any lens. Even if they made a lens that could reach out that far the atmospheric haze would make the image look horrible. Wildlife photography is alot like bowhunting. To get a really good quality frame filling shot of even the large animals your max range is about 70 yards tops. Closer is always better. I usually get some grab shots from a distance and then work my way in getting better shots as I get closer. If the animal doesnt tolerate my presence then I possibly still got some usable shots, but the closer I get the better the images become in almost all cases.
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

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