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Thread: Anchor River Silvers

  1. #1
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    Question Anchor River Silvers

    Any suggestions on how to fish them? I was out there tonight (at river bend hole, I think it's called?) and despite seeing lots of silvers hitting the top as well as V's in the water, could not get them to hit on the pink kodiak special I was using or my dad on a #4 Vibrax with black and sparkles and silver and orange wing/fin. In the few hours I was there I saw one silver and one steel head caught. Any suggestions on how to fish them? Vibrax? Pixie? Kodiak Special? Spinner? Sizes? Colors? Eggs? Herring? etc etc etc. I was thinking of trying some eggs I have but don't really know how to rig them up.

    Any advice is greatly appreciated!

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Default

    fish the tides there are so many people there there is about a 15 minute window with fresh fish that will hit. Also fish closer to the ocean.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Try near the mouth

    Float eggs on an egg loop hook under a bobber as tide comes in, or use a heavy sinker above a 3-4' leader with a small Spin-n-glo or corkie and eggs in an egg loop hook. Vibraxes work well there as well.

    Boy, you are having a LONG Alaska vacation, huh?

  4. #4

    Thumbs up silvers

    Don't forget to try some cut herring either drift fished loose or under a bobber, depending on water depth/current. This can be deadly when nothing else seems to work.

    Regardless, early bird get the worm on the Anchor-that NEVER changes, regardless of tide.

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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Float eggs on an egg loop hook under a bobber as tide comes in, or use a heavy sinker above a 3-4' leader with a small Spin-n-glo or corkie and eggs in an egg loop hook. Vibraxes work well there as well.

    Boy, you are having a LONG Alaska vacation, huh?
    Thanks! This was just the info I was looking for! And yeah, it has been a pretty long vacation! It's been fun but the fishing definitely isn't what I thought it was gonna be. Never the less, it's beautiful up here and my dad is looking for a place to buy around Anchor Point. hehe

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    Quote Originally Posted by bwake View Post
    Don't forget to try some cut herring either drift fished loose or under a bobber, depending on water depth/current. This can be deadly when nothing else seems to work.

    Regardless, early bird get the worm on the Anchor-that NEVER changes, regardless of tide.
    I was wondering if this would work on the Silvers here. It seemed to be pretty darn effective over in Whittier on the Silvers last month. Does this also work further up the Anchor like by the bridge or is it primarily a mouth of the river type thing?

    Thank you! :-D

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    Quote Originally Posted by MaryLeiLannei View Post
    I was wondering if this would work on the Silvers here. It seemed to be pretty darn effective over in Whittier on the Silvers last month. Does this also work further up the Anchor like by the bridge or is it primarily a mouth of the river type thing?

    Thank you! :-D
    This works primarly in the tidal water area of the rivers at or near high tide. Further up the river eggs is a much better choice.

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    Default Another suggestion.....

    Try fishing as close to the ocean as you can at LOW tide. There are a couple holes near the mouth that hold coho when the tide is low. Fish that area with eggs or brightly colored spinners. Once the tide starts coming in, the fishing is over. The fish that were there at low tide will move up with the tide. The tide will bring in more fish, but the water becomes unfishable. Too high, too weedy, too turbid. So get there as the tide is going out, and fish the holes at low tide.

    Good luck.

  9. #9
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default That's not been my experience

    Quote Originally Posted by Cohoangler View Post
    Try fishing as close to the ocean as you can at LOW tide. There are a couple holes near the mouth that hold coho when the tide is low. Fish that area with eggs or brightly colored spinners. Once the tide starts coming in, the fishing is over. The fish that were there at low tide will move up with the tide. The tide will bring in more fish, but the water becomes unfishable. Too high, too weedy, too turbid. So get there as the tide is going out, and fish the holes at low tide.

    Good luck.
    In fact, some of the best fishing I have ever done on the Anchor has been near the mouth as the tide floods, bringing in new fish. Same for Deep Creek and the Ninilchik for kings. Eggs soaking, or under a bobber, or Vibraxes, are all good choices. I have seen people use herring mostly at the Fishin' Hole as it floods. I once saw a guide give a client herring to fish for kings way above the Sterling bridge on the Ninilchik, and the client was catching. Go figure.

    I agree with you when you say that the flood pushes the hold-overs further up the river.

  10. #10
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    Default Silvers on the Anchor

    When I did that thing the time of day was the most important thing. We stumbled down to the river before dawn in mid august and for about an hour just as light started to get into the water there would be a feeding frenzy and we would get our limit. When it got too light it was like a switch going off and you would drift stuff infront of them with out a single hit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnfish View Post
    When I did that thing the time of day was the most important thing. We stumbled down to the river before dawn in mid august and for about an hour just as light started to get into the water there would be a feeding frenzy and we would get our limit. When it got too light it was like a switch going off and you would drift stuff infront of them with out a single hit.
    This feeding frenzy you speak of: was it at the mouth or further up river? By the first boat launch on the beach or up at like Steelhead/Slidehole?

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