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Thread: Surf Casting Information

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    Default Surf Casting Information

    I've been doing some research, searching the forums etc. but am having a hard time finding much information regarding surf casting in Alaska.

    I've heard of a guy in Homer that catches Halibut, Cod, Rock Fish etc from shore - but I'd like a little more information.

    I plan to head to Whittier tomorrow to give it a shot and see what I can catch from shore.
    But my primary interest is halibut, cod, ling cod, rock fishes and anything else that will take the bait
    I know people catch silvers and occasional kings from shore all the time - but my focus is on the other species.

    I know this is a popular fishing sport in the South and Eastern US, but haven't seen much of this in Alaska.

    Any information at all would be appreciated!

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    You make good money, single guy...go buy a boat.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Quote Originally Posted by TWB View Post
    You make good money, single guy...go buy a boat.
    It's about the challenge young man

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    It is tough to do. Most of the shore line is not acessable and the part that is gets hit prety hard. That said, right now can be good at the mouth of small creeks. As the pinks and chums wash out of the mouths of streams some fish will move up to enjoy the buffet. good luck.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scnettek View Post
    It's about the challenge young man
    Surf casting 16oz of weight and bait will do your shoulder wonders. Crippled old fart
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by scnettek View Post
    I've been doing some research, searching the forums etc. but am having a hard time finding much information regarding surf casting in Alaska.

    I've heard of a guy in Homer that catches Halibut, Cod, Rock Fish etc from shore - but I'd like a little more information.

    I plan to head to Whittier tomorrow to give it a shot and see what I can catch from shore.
    But my primary interest is halibut, cod, ling cod, rock fishes and anything else that will take the bait
    I know people catch silvers and occasional kings from shore all the time - but my focus is on the other species.

    I know this is a popular fishing sport in the South and Eastern US, but haven't seen much of this in Alaska.

    Any information at all would be appreciated!
    There have been at least a couple fairly extensive threads on this in the past year or so...sometimes I have trouble using the "search" function, but they're there. I doubt you could get lings anywhere from shore. But halibut and cod off of the Homer spit, yes. Some places in Seward apparently some small rockfish and maybe halibut. The guy(s) in Homer throw waaaaaay off of the end of the spit; the one guy I saw with an actual surf casting outfit fished a little ways beyond the last pylon out there. Use standard halibut bait, maybe squid/octopus to hold on the hook better. And search more in here for much more detailed specifics.
    "The Gods do not subtract from the allotted span of men's lives the hours spent in fishing" Assyrian Tablet 2000 B.C.

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    I'll tell you what I have learned from the few times I have been out last year and this year.

    Places to fish aren't hard to find, but places to fish that have fish seem to be a bit harder. Seward, Homer, and Kodiak are the places I have been to and had the bait chucker with me and used it. Kodiak is the only place I have caught fish. But I'm sure they are out there in those other places.

    I use bait almost exclusivley, and I have found that a whole herring will take alot of bouyancy to keep it off the bottom (read: starfish on your hook). I like to take a herring and cut a fillet and rig that on the hook with two or three corkies. That seems to be an adequare amount of float to keep it from sitting on the bottom.

    Be prepared to lose whole rigs (shock leader, weight and slider, and terminal rig), especially if you are casting 4-8 oz of lead. That's alot of force to put on knots. I have a bunch of shock leaders with slides and termial rigs pre-tied and ready to rock so if (when) a rig snaps off, I can re-tie in a couple of mins and be fishing again. I'll attach a few shots of the rigs I tie up fyi.

    More weight doesn't always equal farther casts. Start with about a 2 oz. bank sinker (depending on your rod size), and work up from there.

    Other than that, I just keep telling myself that when I catch my first butt or ling from shore, it will be all worth it.

    Don't give up if you don't catch something the first time out. The ocean is a big place.....

    Best of luck!

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    Excellent info!

    I'll give it a shot tomorrow and report back.
    I've got several different rigs to try, so with a little luck I'm hoping to catch something other than a Salmon from the shore

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    Try near the processor. I've seen some nice halibut caught from boats maybe 200ft from the docks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    Try near the processor. I've seen some nice halibut caught from boats maybe 200ft from the docks.
    Where is this fish processor? Is this in Homer? Whittier? Seward?

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    Well, Whittier was a bust for halibut from shore.
    But one of my buddies caught a kelp greenling while casting Vibrax from the breakwater.
    Kinda pissed I didn't catch it, cause that would have been my 13th species this year

    There was a group of people filling a rubbermaid tote with fresh herring.
    Seemed to be catching them on Sabiki rigs.

    Salmon Run area is full of pinks, but didn't see any silvers yet.

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    This may or may not be of use to you, but if casting a long distance and bottom fishing, there is something you can do to help tremendously. We do it on the Outer Banks of NC surf fishing for red drum and other bottom dwellers. Take a 12-13 foot surf rod, not a cheapo, a nice Penn rod or better, and have the last 2 feet of it cut off. Then get a new tip that will fit the larger diameter rod end. Then get a high quality large capacity reel and load it with 15-20 lb line. I prefer spinning gear, but most folks after casting distance prefer bait casters. To that loaded reel of 15-20 lb test, attach a 25 foot section of 40-50 lb mono to be used as a shock leader. With this set up, assuming you have a high quality rod cut down properly, you can cast 6-10 ounces of lead a country mile. I think the casting distance record with a 5 ounce weight is a about 300 yards. But normal folks with a proper set up can get 150+ yards for sure. That is a long ways off the shoreline no matter where you call home. The only other thing you need is a pair of leather gloves to keep from ripping your finger tip off. The tackle shops on the coast of NC sell these little suede index finger covers for this purpose. May sound weird man, but you can triple the distance you cast when doing it this way. If bottom fishing from the coast, this is the way to go if you ask me.

    Read this...

    http://www.stripersonline.com/Pages/..._leaders.shtml

    If any info is needed on specifics of cutting a rod down, contact the folks at this NC tackle shop. This is where mine were modified...

    http://www.reddrumtackle.com/



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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    This may or may not be of use to you, but if casting a long distance and bottom fishing, there is something you can do to help tremendously. We do it on the Outer Banks of NC surf fishing for red drum and other bottom dwellers. Take a 12-13 foot surf rod, not a cheapo, a nice Penn rod or better, and have the last 2 feet of it cut off. Then get a new tip that will fit the larger diameter rod end. Then get a high quality large capacity reel and load it with 15-20 lb line. I prefer spinning gear, but most folks after casting distance prefer bait casters. To that loaded reel of 15-20 lb test, attach a 25 foot section of 40-50 lb mono to be used as a shock leader. With this set up, assuming you have a high quality rod cut down properly, you can cast 6-10 ounces of lead a country mile. I think the casting distance record with a 5 ounce weight is a about 300 yards. But normal folks with a proper set up can get 150+ yards for sure. That is a long ways off the shoreline no matter where you call home. The only other thing you need is a pair of leather gloves to keep from ripping your finger tip off. The tackle shops on the coast of NC sell these little suede index finger covers for this purpose. May sound weird man, but you can triple the distance you cast when doing it this way. If bottom fishing from the coast, this is the way to go if you ask me.

    Read this...

    http://www.stripersonline.com/Pages/..._leaders.shtml

    If any info is needed on specifics of cutting a rod down, contact the folks at this NC tackle shop. This is where mine were modified...

    http://www.reddrumtackle.com/



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    Excellent info sir!

    I'll have to check that out, and maybe invest in a heavier rod and reel.
    I'm certain that I need to cast further out, and if I can do that I'm sure it would greatly improve my chances.

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    Worked wonders for me. I was out there (6 hour drive from my house) for the weekend and getting skunked. Asked these old timers (because they always know) what the deal was. I got this shiny new rod, cast it a mile (I thought), yet no fish. To the left and right these salty *******s were bringing in 30+ lb fish. The guy looks at me and says, "You need to cut your rod down", like I was the only person on the planet that didn't know this. Thought he was joking at first. The next day (still no fish), I go to the tackle shop and reluctantly ask them to cut my brand new surf rod down. Ten minutes later I have a 9 foot something rod with a tip section about the size of your pinkie finger. The following day, FISH ON!!! Seems the extra 80+/- yards of casting distance was a favorable thing
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Dan, is there a formula for cutting the rod? I have an Ugly Stick surf rod, about 12 feet long I think, have not used it yet. I bought it on impulse after reading about the Homer guys surf casting for Halibut. Thanks for your posts, great info.
    NRA Lifetime Member

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    Where is this fish processor? Is this in Homer? Whittier? Seward?




    I was speaking about the one in Whittier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    Where is this fish processor? Is this in Homer? Whittier? Seward?




    I was speaking about the one in Whittier.
    Excellent - well maybe I just need to get a better casting rig to get me out that far.
    I was fishing in what I believe was that area on the East end of the small boat harbor?
    It was near a very tall dock and a large fishing vessel pulled up while we were there. So I think I know where you're talking about.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scnettek View Post
    Well, Whittier was a bust for halibut from shore.
    But one of my buddies caught a kelp greenling while casting Vibrax from the breakwater.
    Kinda pissed I didn't catch it, cause that would have been my 13th species this year

    There was a group of people filling a rubbermaid tote with fresh herring.
    Seemed to be catching them on Sabiki rigs.

    Salmon Run area is full of pinks, but didn't see any silvers yet.
    Have you caught any herring? You could pretty easily add them to your list. Just copy what the folks down there are doing. I just tried this about a week ago and now have about 25lbs of the freshest bait around.

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    Thanks for that info. Dan.

    I have a 12ft ocean master thats a real solid rod but Im wondering if cutting it down to 10 or even 9 feet would make it even better.
    Should I just slam the door shut on the tip?

    Scnettek, I am obsessed with catching a halibut from shore. Before my trip last year, I spent so much time online trying to find info on it. I even bought a new surf rod that only brought me some flounder and those ugly guys...cabezons? Not sure what they are called.

    anyways, I got some GREAT info here:

    http://www.stripersonline.com/surfta...=halibuthunter

    Whats funny is that, this guy ''halibuthunter'', met with the guy who started this thread on our forum:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...315#post315315

    and while I was out there on the spit, I actually met this ''halibut hunter'' and he had this crazy kite set up to bring his bait out about 200 yrds. I describe it on page 4 of the thread.

    The last time I saw him (aug 2008), he told me that him or his buddy had just caught a 35lb a few days earlier. Dont remember the details though.

    Im actually planning on going to kodiak in late aug. early sept next year and my main goal is to catch a decent halibut from shore.

    By 'decent' I mean one that is not already at the supermarket.

    good luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishnngrinn View Post
    Dan, is there a formula for cutting the rod? I have an Ugly Stick surf rod, about 12 feet long I think, have not used it yet. I bought it on impulse after reading about the Homer guys surf casting for Halibut. Thanks for your posts, great info.

    In my earlier post, there is a link to the Red Drum Tackle shop in Cape Hatteras (Outer Banks of NC). These guys know the deal. Call them for better info than I can offer. Generally speaking, you would want about 2 feet off that rod. In doing so, you don't want the new tip to be 2-3" above a lower eye though. Try to keep 6" or more seperating the distal (tip) and next eye going down. Two feet is a rough number with this factored in and it will depend greatly on the design of the rod. That is the jist of it, but like I said, these guys at the shop can advise you better than I.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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