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Thread: Dry fired bow!

  1. #1
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    Default Dry fired bow!

    I let a guy check out my new bow yesterday and when he drew it back he wasn't expecting it to stop where it did and lost his grip on the string. I checked over the string and it looks to be ok but my question is, once a bow is dry fired, how great is the potential for string damage? Should I get it restrung or is it safe to continue use? I put a few arrows through it last night and it seemed to be ok but I did notice that it seemed a lot louder than before it was dry fired, it had a very noticeable twang to it when fired. Any ideas?

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    Member ArcherBob's Avatar
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    Default Ouch!

    Had a simmalar incident, hate to tell you this but your limb or limbs may have a hairline crack. Both of mine did! I would be extremely cautious, inspect them very well. maybe even take it to a pro.

    Be carefull, if it were me I would not shoot it untill absolutely sure there was no damage. Don't hurt yourself
    Bob

    Become one with Nature......... Then Marinade it.

  3. #3
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    NEVER, ever, ever pull back or allow someone else to pull on your bow unless shooting it.

    Why is it that you hand someone your bow and they ask how much poundage it is, and then they always want to pull it back?

    It's AMATURISH and nothing good can come of it.

    Taylor

    -[]------->

  4. #4
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    What brand of bow is it? Hoyt claims they can be dry fired without damage. Others are almost guaranteed to have some sort of problem afterward.
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  5. #5
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    I'll tell ya this, I will never let someone pull my bow back again unless they have an arrow knocked and they are sighted in on a target! I am definately going to take it in to my bow shop and get it checked out before I use it again. Hopefully all checks out well. Thanks for the advice!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    What brand of bow is it? Hoyt claims they can be dry fired without damage. Others are almost guaranteed to have some sort of problem afterward.
    That's what really has me worried. It's a Bowtech Sniper, which is their entry level bow. It's brand new though, I traded an old bow a buddy gave me several years ago and a little cash for it to another buddy who isn't much into archery. He bought thinking he was going to start then decided he didn't have time for it. My old bow was about 15-16 years old and in much need of some fixin up so I figured I couldn't go wrong with it.

  7. #7
    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
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    Default Get it checked

    take it to a pro and have it thouroghly checked out. Hope you and the guy that dry fired it are on good terms. You may need some expensive repairs. Worse case, damaged limbs that have to be replaced. Better case, just loosened up something. I would not draw or shoot it again until it is checked out by a pro. Having a bow blow up at full draw is not very much fun and could cause serious injury.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

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    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Sorry, I failed to wish you well in getting it resolved. One thing is for sure. It will never have to happen again I bet...

    Taylor

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    Angry

    We are on good terms and I actually work with the guy so I will have no problem getting ahold of him if it comes down to it. This couldn't have happened at a worse time, I have my field day shoot for my bowhunters cert at the end of this month and then regular season hunts open up right after that. I didn't get drawn for any permits this year and if I end up having to make any repairs I just hope I can get it done before Sep. 1st or I will be rifle hunting for the first part of the season. I have been shooting bows for a couple years now but have never hunted with one. I was really looking forward to hopefully bagging my first critter with a bow this year to. Even if I didn't at least I would have had the chance to bow hunt which would be a good time in itself.

  10. #10

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    I'd be more worried about limb damage in the pockets then string damage......

  11. #11
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    The wifes going to drop it off today and have it checked out. I called ahead of time to let them know what happened so I am hoping for the best.

  12. #12
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Ouch!!!! I hope your limbs aren't fried, but I'm not holding my breath!!!

    Brett

  13. #13
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    I looked it over myself and the string seemed to be fine, of course I don't have enough experience to know what to look for on the limbs when a bow has beend dry fired. Still waiting to hear back on it, the guy at the bow shop won't be there till this afternoon so hopefully he will be able to get to it today.

  14. #14
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    One of the things Trad and compound bows share is the effects of dry firing. The limbs are your main concern especially in the area of the limb pocket.The arrow takes all the stored energy of the limbs during a normal shooting.(well between 99% and 85% of it any way, lower in badly made long bows) If the bow is dry fired the limbs have to take all that stored energy, it's like whacking the base of your limb with a sledge hammer! Because the limbs of a compound are so much shorter the effect can be even worse for them as the force is further concentrated into a small area. The bowyer will have to disassemble your bow and very carefully inspect the limbs and limb pockets. It may take him a day or two.

    Good luck but having had a bow blow up in my hands I think I'd be bow shopping! That twang makes me really nervous! A delaminated limb can be very noisy without failing immediately.
    BHA Member
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  15. #15
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    A friend of mine had his Bowtech Guardian at full draw the other day and heard a "clunk". He didn't release and tried to let the bow down, but it stayed at full draw! He said he didn't really know what to do with it at that point (kinda like holding a time bomb...). He ended up putting a ratchet strap around the limbs and took the bow back to Sportsmans Warehouse where he bought it. Luckily there actually was an "expert" working the archery counter that day and found they had screwed up a recall repair. A screw holding one of the modules on had broken and allowed the module to get wedged in the limb while it was at full draw which didn't let it come down.

    There is a LOT of energy stored in those limbs!
    AKmud
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    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  16. #16
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default if nothing else

    maybe you can borrow your old bow back from your buddy and practice with it enough to pass your test......good luck with your dilemma ....hope you get everything squared away before season
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  17. #17
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    Got my bow back today and everything checked out fine. He said he checked it out thoroughly, twice, and went over all the bolts to check for tightness and didn't find anything either time. Took it home and put a few arrows through it and it shot just fine and the twang that I thought I heard was no longer present. Was probably just in my head but either way I am extremely relieved that it is ok. I'll say this though, I learned a valuable lesson about letting people handle my bow and I won't let them pull it back without having an arrow in it. Next step is the bowhunter cert so now I can get back to practicing. Thanks all.

  18. #18

    Thumbs up Dry Fired

    AK Mud The bow was a Bow Tech General. What happened was one of the module screws had fallen out and at full draw the cam broke leaving the bow in full draw position. It wasnt anything to do with the recall. Anybody who shoots a Bow Tech should make sure the mods are blue loctited in, even the new adjustable mods. The fun part was getting the limbs relaxed!!!!!

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