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Thread: New Marlin 1895 question

  1. #1
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    Default New Marlin 1895 question

    My cousin picked up a beautiful, brand new Marlin 1895 GS today. I noticed while shooting it that the lever action was smooth until the last half inch--right before the lever was almost touching the stock. I had to almost wiggle the lever and use a lot of force to get it to complete the action. Is this normal for new 1895s? It was only like this with rounds in the gun (standard over the counter).

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    Not on any I've ever shot but I haven't tried any made in say the last ten years so newer ones may be different.

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    mine doesn't do that, smooth as glass

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    Let me clarify now that I'm more familiar with the gun. When cycled with a strong motion, quickly, it will cycle well.

    When the lever is worked slowly, the gun cycles fine until the last motion--where the carrier must slide down over a round in the tube to the base.

    I'm guessing the force of the round in the tube pressing out, which the carrier has to slide down over, is causing the friction. Maybe the carrier is catching on the round in some way; maybe the new gun, with a strong new tube spring, in addition to slightly longer Hornady Leverevolution ammunition, needs to be worn in with regular ammo.

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    Default sounds familiar

    Hello Petesull,

    I have two marlin 45-70's (guide gun and cowboy model) and while my gg cycles great the cowboy version jams like crazy. I took it to the local gun smith for a polish and it works better but is by no means flawless like the gg. I have shot everything through it....from buffalo bore to the Rem. 405 grain rounds. Never had a problem with the buffalo bore rounds but the hornady's and the Rem 405's jam half way out of the magazine tube. This happened on my last hog hunt right after I shot a 160 lb pig in the nose. (I know what you guys are thinking, "great shot dude!" but the Rem. 405's pack such a punch it knocked the pig backwords and I think unconscious! It gave me time to stick my car key into the action and pry the stuck round out of the tube the rest of the way, chamber it and then place the final shot just below its ear as it was getting back up. Pretty lucky situation if you ask me!
    And by the way, the Hornady's are terrible for hunting pigs...i shot one right through the skull and my buddy couldn't tell which was the entry hole and which was the exit!
    I hope you get your action figured out...if you do let me know what you did.

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    Quote Originally Posted by petesull View Post
    Let me clarify now that I'm more familiar with the gun. When cycled with a strong motion, quickly, it will cycle well.

    When the lever is worked slowly, the gun cycles fine until the last motion--where the carrier must slide down over a round in the tube to the base.

    I'm guessing the force of the round in the tube pressing out, which the carrier has to slide down over, is causing the friction. Maybe the carrier is catching on the round in some way; maybe the new gun, with a strong new tube spring, in addition to slightly longer Hornady Leverevolution ammunition, needs to be worn in with regular ammo.
    The last half inch of lever travel......the carrier is actually called the lifter. When the lever is fully open the lifter is at the bottom of the action. The last of the opening stroke depresses the latch that holds the round in the magazine tube and allows the cartridge to pop out and lie over the lifter. As the lever is started upward the lifter lifts the cartridge up to barrel alignment. The lever then moves the bolt forward and pushes the cartridge into the chamber. When the lifter drops back down, it does not, should not, touch the cartridge rim. I was thinking the lifter drops at the start of the opening stroke but may drop at the end of closing as you are describing. That last little bit of lever stroke also pushes the cartridge into the chamber and headspaces the cartridges. That isn't really the term but if the last of the stroke is tight, it could be due to cartridge fit. The cartridge or the chamber is not dimensioned correctly, or there is too little headspace. (It is also possibel the chamber is still full of grease at the rim cut.) Headspace for the 45-70 is based on rim thickness. A gap of .062" (rim thickness) plus up to .006" are needed to have correct headspace. Unofficially this dimension usually more than needed and will even accept some crud on the rim and still close. I have seen one Marlin that had too little headspace. I just packed up my 45-70 headspace gage along with many others.

    When the carrier/lifter that drops back down, I don't think it should touch the cartridge. If that is the source of the problem it would not do it when only one round is put into the magazine. It could be because the cartridge latch or loading gate isn't holding the cartridge in position far enough forward but this would likely bind the lifter from getting into position. All the feeding seems to work ok. I would at least try another brand of ammo. Generally any feeding problems with these guns involve cartridge length or nose configuration and how well the cartridge lies in the little cradle of this lifter. The lifter can be modified and was one of the improvements recently made in the 1895 to enable it to feed the custom makers big flat nosed bullets.

    One other little thing I just thought of. I had a similar problem a couple years ago. This last little bit of lever travel may be when the extractor is snapping over the rim. The rim of the cartridge should be sliding under the extractor as the cartridge is lifted up. If not this can be one of the reasons for rough feeding. It actually slides under the extractor as it is pushed into the chamber and this is using the chamber as a guide for the cartridge. It isn't a good arrangement for smooth feeding and this is why we see scratch marks on the case when cycling our dummy rounds. There may be a burr or crud under the extractor. The extractor itself is a smooth piece of spring steel that just grips the bolt in a groove around it. It is usually smooth as a baby's butt, but could be funky some how. The extractor cut at the barrel chamber face could also have a burr or debris in it. Thats it, I'm out of gas on this. The Marlin lever is a very simple device, it shouldn't be hard to diagnose a problem.
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  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    The last half inch of lever travel......the carrier is actually called the lifter. When the lever is fully open the lifter is at the bottom of the action. The last of the opening stroke depresses the latch that holds the round in the magazine tube and allows the cartridge to pop out and lie over the lifter. As the lever is started upward the lifter lifts the cartridge up to barrel alignment. The lever then moves the bolt forward and pushes the cartridge into the chamber. When the lifter drops back down, it does not, should not, touch the cartridge rim. I was thinking the lifter drops at the start of the opening stroke but may drop at the end of closing as you are describing. That last little bit of lever stroke also pushes the cartridge into the chamber and headspaces the cartridges. That isn't really the term but if the last of the stroke is tight, it could be due to cartridge fit. The cartridge or the chamber is not dimensioned correctly, or there is too little headspace. (It is also possibel the chamber is still full of grease at the rim cut.) Headspace for the 45-70 is based on rim thickness. A gap of .062" (rim thickness) plus up to .006" are needed to have correct headspace. Unofficially this dimension usually more than needed and will even accept some crud on the rim and still close. I have seen one Marlin that had too little headspace. I just packed up my 45-70 headspace gage along with many others.

    When the carrier/lifter that drops back down, I don't think it should touch the cartridge. If that is the source of the problem it would not do it when only one round is put into the magazine. It could be because the cartridge latch or loading gate isn't holding the cartridge in position far enough forward but this would likely bind the lifter from getting into position. All the feeding seems to work ok. I would at least try another brand of ammo. Generally any feeding problems with these guns involve cartridge length or nose configuration and how well the cartridge lies in the little cradle of this lifter. The lifter can be modified and was one of the improvements recently made in the 1895 to enable it to feed the custom makers big flat nosed bullets.

    One other little thing I just thought of. I had a similar problem a couple years ago. This last little bit of lever travel may be when the extractor is snapping over the rim. The rim of the cartridge should be sliding under the extractor as the cartridge is lifted up. If not this can be one of the reasons for rough feeding. It actually slides under the extractor as it is pushed into the chamber and this is using the chamber as a guide for the cartridge. It isn't a good arrangement for smooth feeding and this is why we see scratch marks on the case when cycling our dummy rounds. There may be a burr or crud under the extractor. The extractor itself is a smooth piece of spring steel that just grips the bolt in a groove around it. It is usually smooth as a baby's butt, but could be funky some how. The extractor cut at the barrel chamber face could also have a burr or debris in it. Thats it, I'm out of gas on this. The Marlin lever is a very simple device, it shouldn't be hard to diagnose a problem.
    WOW...thanks for the post Murphy. I don't own a Marlin levergun yet, but I sure appreciate the knowledge you just imparted.

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    Thanks Murphy. The hold up when slow cycling is right before what you consider the last step--right before the latch is secured to hold the next round in place.

    If you look through the loading port, you'll see the lifter slide down as you depress the lever towards the stock. This is when it sticks. The next round is trying to push out while the lifter and the small tab attached to the lifter (that sticks out of the bottom of the gun) hold back that next round. I'm guessing the force of the next round, with a new spring and larger leverevolution rounds, makes it tough to slide the end of the lifter down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by petesull View Post
    Thanks Murphy. The hold up when slow cycling is right before what you consider the last step--right before the latch is secured to hold the next round in place.

    If you look through the loading port, you'll see the lifter slide down as you depress the lever towards the stock. This is when it sticks. The next round is trying to push out while the lifter and the small tab attached to the lifter (that sticks out of the bottom of the gun) hold back that next round. I'm guessing the force of the next round, with a new spring and larger leverevolution rounds, makes it tough to slide the end of the lifter down.
    You're right. I'll look over my 1895 tonight but I'm sure you have it as to function. The last click of closing lever drops the lifter and pushes the cartridge away form the magazine latch/loading gate leaving it to rest on the lifter. Now, why would this be worse with the leverlution ammo? Why would this make the lever drag more than nomal? Hmmmm??
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