Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Correct Safety Chain Procedure??

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    20

    Default Correct Safety Chain Procedure??

    I'm curious how everyone attaches their safety chain from the trailer winch to the bow of the boat. I've seen it done two ways. The method which seems safest is the chain is hooked directly through the loop on the boat hull. The other possibility is that the safety chain is simply looped through the eyelet on the winch strap hook. Does that make sense, hope I explained it right.

    The reason I ask is that the first of these options seems the best (directly to the boat), but on my boat that's a pain. There is not enough room for both the chain and hook to move so I have to release the tension on the winch strap in order to get the chain unhooked. Not a huge deal, but then your boat is completely unhooked from the trailer.....when you have a roller trailer....(I learned what happens the hard way). It seems very unlikely to me that the steal hook on the winch strap would ever break, so why not put the safety chain through that?

    So the right answer is probably to use another 3rd safety device or to "just" always remember to hook the winch strap back on and lock the winch. However it would be so much easier to just put the safety chain through the hook on the winch strap. That also removes one more thing to forget. Let's face it...when the fish are biting and there is a line of people behind you waiting to launch we all get dumb real fast.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK_Kletus View Post
    I'm curious how everyone attaches their safety chain from the trailer winch to the bow of the boat. I've seen it done two ways. The method which seems safest is the chain is hooked directly through the loop on the boat hull. The other possibility is that the safety chain is simply looped through the eyelet on the winch strap hook. Does that make sense, hope I explained it right.

    The reason I ask is that the first of these options seems the best (directly to the boat), but on my boat that's a pain. There is not enough room for both the chain and hook to move so I have to release the tension on the winch strap in order to get the chain unhooked. Not a huge deal, but then your boat is completely unhooked from the trailer.....when you have a roller trailer....(I learned what happens the hard way). It seems very unlikely to me that the steal hook on the winch strap would ever break, so why not put the safety chain through that?

    So the right answer is probably to use another 3rd safety device or to "just" always remember to hook the winch strap back on and lock the winch. However it would be so much easier to just put the safety chain through the hook on the winch strap. That also removes one more thing to forget. Let's face it...when the fish are biting and there is a line of people behind you waiting to launch we all get dumb real fast.
    Not quite sure I follow. When I retrieve my boat, I hook the hook on the wench strap to the bow eye and crank up the boat. Then I hook the chain's hook to the bow eye. When launching, I unhook the chain hook from the bow eye and then unhook the strap hook from the bow eye. Which part of that process is giving your trouble? Without yet understanding where the problem is, I'll say now that I personally don't think it's a good idea to have only one hook through the bow eye. By having two separate points of attachment, if one totally fails then there's an entirely different system to take over.

  3. #3

    Default

    I agree with Skydiver that the safety chain hooked directly to the bow eye gives you an entirely seperate safety link in case anything goes wrong. I have had to do what you are referring to a couple times before I was able to get my boat all the way up on the trailer and the safety chain was a bit short. But once I got it pulled up I then hooked the safety chain hook directly to the bow eye. Can you just get extra chain for the safety chain and would that help or not?

  4. #4
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    Just be sure to leave the winch strap hooked up until your stern is in the water.

    I saw 4 boats hit the Kenai Public Launch.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    20

    Default

    The problem is that the hook on the safety chain and the hook on the winch strap barely fit through the bow eye. They do both fit, but only if both are unhooked at the same time and pushed through the bow eye at "just the right angle." It's just a very irritating song and dance to go through while your having to balance on the trailer tongue in a few inches of water.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    279

    Default

    attach a separate clevis to the bow eye and hook both safety devices to the clevis

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akpolaris View Post
    attach a separate clevis to the bow eye and hook both safety devices to the clevis
    If this is done, then he's putting all of his eggs in one basket, so to speak. I think that would be as iffy as if he were to go the route he was originally asking about. Just my 2 cents.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    279

    Default

    You should have a safety chain that is attached to the post that the winch is secured on (or somewhere) plus the winch strap / rope clip, correct???

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    20

    Default

    akpolaris, a clevis is a good idea. That would probably be the best route. It is adding a point of failure into the system, but probably very minimal. I would guess a clevis could support the weight of the entire boat.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    952

    Default

    Add a clevis that fits the bow eye with either the winch hook or the safety chain hook. Then hook one directly to the bow eye and the other to the clevis. That should make it quick and easy to get hooked up at the bottom of the ramp and eliminates the single failure point (except for the bow eye itself).

  11. #11

    Default

    How about a good carabiner? Quick, big, makes room for the extra hook? How about a cable with a loop, etc... for the same idea? I have a chain and the crank cable, my trailer is a bunk, no slipping off. I leave only one hooked (chain or cable) until the waterline is between the truck and boat, then my boating buddy walks between them and releases it, then I continue back. Rollers suck for obvious reasons and don't support a large boat as well as bunks, the boat floats on and floats off. Roller trailers are the accident trailers!

  12. #12

    Question how about...

    Can you have another eye welded or bolted on your boat? 2 eyes are better then one. Eyes have broke or pulled out before.

  13. #13

    Default

    Here's what I did. I attached a stainless steel shackle to my bow eye. The shackle has a nice shape that accommodates the winch strap hook.

    The short galvanized safety chain attaches behind the shackle and into a hole in the trailer winch frame.

    This way if the strap fails, the safety chain will hold. With the shackle in place on the bow eye the bulky strap hook does not interfere with the bow roller or the safety chain snap.

    Also, be sure to secure your stern so that you not only keep the stern down to the trailer, but you also add another level of security to keep the boat from rolling/sliding back from the bow roller. I use a stern strap on each side.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14

    Default

    West Marine has some spendy stainless steel shackles that work great. I cringed when I bought mine, but it is a lifetime investment, as my shackle has been used on my last two boats.

    The photo below is not the exact shackle I use. I found the photo on the Internet.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #15

    Default Something common...

    here (Kauai) is lots of guys will rope down their boats directly to the trailer itself, independent of the stap/chain bow eye; this would apply more during the road trip. Most boats have at least one cleat on the bow and this makes it easy to do this. Keeps the rig together if all else fails. Also like the idea of a separate point of attachment in lieu of the above. Roller trailers kinda suck IMO; our previous boat had a roller and it was a PITA, our current rig has bunks, much easier and more importantly, immensely safer. Easy to convert your trailer to bunks.
    Jim

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    20

    Default Thanks!

    Looks like I'll be installing a shackle tonight! Bobshem, great photos! Thanks all for the help.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •