Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36

Thread: Moose Hunting for a Dummy(me) Need Advise Please

  1. #1
    Member powderhound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Valley
    Posts
    297

    Default Moose Hunting for a Dummy(me) Need Advise Please

    Alright here is the deal, I am not an ol time hunter. I have actually never hunted any big game. I have the opportunity this year to hunt with my new father in law this year. I would like to head out there with atleast as much knowledge as I can gather here. I believe I know right where to hit the guy to take him down but I would like to watch a detailed video on youtube or some kind of pointers I can get from pictures. I have most of the gear, Pack, Boots, Packable rain gear and my riffle. I plan to try to sight in my new 300 when I get home. There again I have never done that either so as you can see I kinda could use some "for Dummies " info here. My father inlaw can teach me alot but I would like to walk in there with a little help.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    sighting in your rifle. Go to a good shop to help you get it set up and laser bore sighted. I reccommend the folks at Boondock sporting goods in Eagle river. They have their vise set up in the store and will work w/ you right there. I have never had anyone other than me spend as much time or be as careful w/ my rifle than they were!

    When you get to the range start close and work out. I usually start @ 20 yards or so and sight in till I am about an inch low. Then move back to 100 and adjust till I am 2.5" high. This should get you very close to dead on at 200 yards, and a few inches low out to about 300 yards.

    Your patience is the best thing you can take hunting for moose. Stay optimistic and understand that any moment of any day could be the one where your moose appears. When your attention starts to waver is when you will spook a bruiser and get to do nothing but look at it's stubby little tail for a moment before it dissapears.

    Talk to your FIL and see what kind of terrain you will be hunting. Moose live in several different types. Alpine hunting is best done w/ good solid purpose built boots w/ a waterproof membrane and 8-10 tops. Wet swamp will best be done in either lacross alpha's or similar or hip boots.

    Mind the wind and the noise and you should be in good shape! There are also plenty of good video's both in this websites store as well as on the shelves at Sportsmans or othere shops.

    Also check out these video's from our ow Dept of Fish and Game http://www.multimedia.adfg.alaska.gov/

    Most important is HAVE FUN, enjoy hanging w/ the new old man in your life and good luck!

  3. #3
    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    448

    Default

    You're not a dummy, you're a hunter now, I respect the fact that you are here requesting some knowledge instead of heading into the woods blind and hurting someone or yourself.

    Moose hunting is WORK, if you are pretty out of shape, i would start some sort of exercise program NOW. At least do some long range walking.

    Set up a sheet of plywood standing up length wise at a hundred yards and study it, a legal moose rack is 2 inches wider than this. Random i know, but it is a way to get a visual for the field.

    Don't know what you are used to shooting, if anything at all, but a .300 is a good gun. Not a lot of kick, but it ain't no .22 cal. Most people need to shoot a bit to get comfortable with a new gun, you should at least take it out for a couple of sessions before you take it out to hunt.

    Shooting decisions- I am a lung man myself, some like head, spine, and neck shots. Sometimes you have no choice. Here is a link to understand where a mooses vitals are and how big. http://www.mooseheaven.com/best-kill-shot-for-moose.htm

    Bring out at least 2 sharp knives, use the first to cut through that moose hair, it will dull the hell out of a blade. I always try to save my second knife for the bung-hole job(you'll learn what that is) and quartering.

    Fill out that tag right away! F&G always seem to pop up when you aren't ready..........Bring out the antlers LAST. Leave the penis attached to one leg. And reload your gun after the moose is down, for bears.

    Moose can cover a lot of country if hit wrong, don't shoot and look, keep shooting till he's down!!!!

    There is a whole wealth of knowledge i'm sure other hunters will give you here, i'm tired of writing!!!

    And youtube moose calling, learn how to do it and you may impress your father in law!!

    Good luck.
    The Second Amendment.......Know it, love it, support it.

  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Patience Patience paitence...


    you can read all the books


    watch all the video's


    listen to all the stories....


    if you don't have PAITENCE... you wont score...


    last season i hunted 23 of a 25 day season before pulling mine down... yet my wife bagged hers the 2nd day i was gone off the porch at home...


    there are some you hear are easy and some you work you ass off for....


    i guess the number one thing a hunter should have and practice... is PATIENCE!

    when you get discouraged is when you doubt your area, ability, and stop having fun...

    hunting is work.. but a very FUN work if you make it so... your out with father in law... remember... YES SIR! NO SIR! and be patient..



    now go grab 3 arm loads of wood and those dutch ovens... its chore time


    moose hunting has a list of chores that need to be done daily... we all share our duty... typically if one cooks the other cleans... wood is every ones shore as is cleaning up the camp...


    don't worry about having to make that shot... it does NOT matter WHO shoots the moose.. as long as the tag is full and your meat is harvested. your in a family group... talk to FIL about how many you really need? if you see two? are you taking them both? or is one Really enough? are you looking for THE BIG ONE? or is a nice meat bull good enough? those kind of questions are what will get FIL attention... and know your on your way to being a quality hunter. and endure you to him... for years to come...

    show you care about hunting and the game you take... high fives and whooping are fine... but a moment of reverence for the creature you took should also be part of the celebration.

    it is not the hunt that makes the hunter... it is the hunter that makes the hunt, knowing how to kill an animal is the first step, respecting and caring for that same animal is the largest step... sharing that animal... is the sign of the hunter

    Patience. hard work,. understanding, respect, are the ABC's of moose hunting.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  5. #5
    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
    Posts
    305

    Default

    Don't be afraid to let your new father-in-law be your mentor. You will form a close bond with him on this first hunting trip. Just be helpful and willing to learn and you will both have a great hunt.

  6. #6

    Default

    Right on Vince! Thats what makes it the best hunt. Being close to the animal your hunting. Focus on your kill area and take a deep breath. Don't forget your follow up shot. A bruiser can get back up after a well place shot to the lungs, wondering what hit him. Have a great hunt and enjoy the company.

  7. #7

    Smile you can do it...

    We were all first time moose hunters at some point in our life. I have been doing it for 44 years and I learn something new every trip. Moose are a lot smarter then they get credit for. If they were'nt the succes rate for hunters would be higher. They see good, have great noses and hear better then any animal up here. The rut and their size makes them vulnerable. Try hard to keep your shots under 200 yards and use a rest. Aim for the lungs. Don't expect them to fall over dead from a lung shot, they like to think about what just happened for a minute or 2. Be patient, patient, patient. I have only shot one moose on opening day. That was a cow that was in the ditch in Unit 12 in 1973. I once hunted 15 straight days before I pulled the trigger. Learn how to sight your own scope in. Plenty of "how to" info on the web and it is easy to do. Besides, if you ever have to do it in the field you will be glad you took the time to learn how. I like "slow walking" trails in the morning and sitting on meadows and ponds in the evenings. I walk a short ways, look, listen and pull a few leaves off the willow bushes. The moose almost always hear you, but they don't always know what you are if they don't see or smell you. Ther are lots of videos showing moose being shot. It takes a few years to be a "good moose hunter". Enjoy the journey.

  8. #8
    Member walk-in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    771

    Default buy good glass

    In most areas of the state, you'll be hunting before the rut for most if not all of the season. Calling isn't effective. My advice is to find some place where you have a good view of the surrounding area, sit down, and glass. I've had more success this way than with any other pre-rut tactic. You need to be patient and have faith that it will work, though. I've spent days on end sitting on a hillside overlooking good moose browse before seeing a moose. If you're not patient, you'll give up too soon.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

  9. #9
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Lujon, 20 yards with a 300?

    Really tho with a 300 if it was bore sighted right should get you in the grove at a 100 yards on the first shot. Or at least let you be able to hit a 12"x12" area. Then dial in from there.

    From personal experiance just try iron sights til you get familar with the rifle and you will be amazed what you can do with the scope.

    I personally like to hunt without the scope, but that is my prefance, some feel better seeing things up close. ( I've always had this hangup about scopes after using one the first time and aimed at the lungs and hit it in the spine. That was on a floating trip and the moose was less than 50 yards. Secound time was when I was hunting on a misty morn, saw the thing and looked threw the scope and saw nothing, O.K. not the best scope LOL ( fogged up.) This was long time before they had the pop up lens covers and all the new fog res. scopes. The thing was I had over and under sights on the fogged up rifle and did'nt even think about the open sights, to busy trying to clean the scope, and he got away.)

    Lujon must have some bucks if he can start out at 20 yards and keep firing those bullets. (J/K) I know the last box of 338s that I bought 3 years ago was $52.00 , so I try to limit my pratice and make them all count.

    Just my thoughts.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    The best way ever to learn how to sight a rifle and shoot it well, shot placement, and where to hunt is with the help of a knowledgeable person.

    I learned to shoot shoot rifles while in the military, but was a late-bloomer bunter, right by the time I retired from the military. By then I had couple of civilian friends who had hunted Alaska game for years, and they taught me the ropes. At the beginning I just accompanied them on their hunts, and helped them on everything relating to the hunt (I didn't do the killing). A couple of years later I began to hunt while they slept late into the morning, and whenever I killed a moose they would help me with it, and I would share the meat in equal portions. That's the type of hunting friendship we continue to this day. We don't even talk about who is first or last to shoot, because it doesn't matter. What matters is that when whichever one of us kills a moose, the meat belongs to all of us, regardless if one of us is there or not at the moment.

  11. #11
    Member powderhound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Valley
    Posts
    297

    Default Thanks everyone

    WOW, thanks!
    Those links helped out alot. I gathered alot of good opinions on kill points of the Moose. I personally will targe the lungs if applicable. My Riffle is a 300 Ultra Mag. I have a 3x9x40 Nikon scope mounted on it and they bore sighted it in at Sportsmans when I bought it. I had them do that to a lil 10-22 I got last year and I found it to not be very accurate aat 20 yards or so. I am kinda doubting there work, maybe it was just that one time or me?
    So I will plan on attempting to get comfortabe with this riffle now. Should I go to a range? or just poor boy it somewhere? The ammo is not cheap but I must get fimular with it so we will do what ever is necessary.
    I am in the market for a spotting scope. There will be two others up there glassing aswell. I am considering just picking up a cheap one to get by for now. As you all know if you had to buy all of your gear from scratch it aint cheap. Here is the one I am considering. I know it is probly a joke in many peoples eyes but ohh well it has to be worth the $65! Right?
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWAX:IT

    As for a alright dressing knife, what length of blade do you prefer? Hooked? Fixed handle?
    I will come up with more questions soon as they come to me, please bear with me here gentlemen. lol
    Any good links on how to sight in your riffle?

  12. #12
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by powderhound View Post
    WOW, thanks!
    Those links helped out alot. I gathered alot of good opinions on kill points of the Moose. I personally will targe the lungs if applicable. My Riffle is a 300 Ultra Mag. I have a 3x9x40 Nikon scope mounted on it and they bore sighted it in at Sportsmans when I bought it. I had them do that to a lil 10-22 I got last year and I found it to not be very accurate aat 20 yards or so. I am kinda doubting there work, maybe it was just that one time or me?
    So I will plan on attempting to get comfortabe with this riffle now. Should I go to a range? or just poor boy it somewhere? The ammo is not cheap but I must get fimular with it so we will do what ever is necessary.
    I am in the market for a spotting scope. There will be two others up there glassing aswell. I am considering just picking up a cheap one to get by for now. As you all know if you had to buy all of your gear from scratch it aint cheap. Here is the one I am considering. I know it is probly a joke in many peoples eyes but ohh well it has to be worth the $65! Right?
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWAX:IT

    As for a alright dressing knife, what length of blade do you prefer? Hooked? Fixed handle?
    I will come up with more questions soon as they come to me, please bear with me here gentlemen. lol
    Any good links on how to sight in your riffle?

    K well first

    Bore siting ONLY puts it on or near the paper, out to about 100 yards.. you will need to learn your rifle an shoot it some.. to group them and adjust your sites to 2 inches high of center...

    as for spotting scope... HONESTLY.. you could NOT buy one yet if there are already one-two in camp... good glasses to locate... spots can be traded off to judge.. MY opinion? make a good spot NEXT years buy..

    as for knifes? i have used out door edge on MANY MANY MANY moose.. they are still good.. the Griz pack is inexpensive and will last you several seasons with care... easy to sharpen... etc etc... has a skinning with gut hook, caping and bone saw in one pack... i have TWO sets of them.. now.. as you grow in you quest.. your gear will change.. so purchase first what your hand and budget are comfortable with... my Favorite knife?


    akguy454 made it for me
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  13. #13
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I like my method of getting gear.... Work ALL the time and shop online durring down time. This assures that I have the finest unused gear that money can buy! Well at least that is how it fees anymore...

  14. #14
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I like my method of getting gear.... Work ALL the time and shop online durring down time. This assures that I have the finest unused gear that money can buy! Well at least that is how it fees anymore...


    Face it Jon.....


    you just ike to collect gear to Ogle at
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  15. #15
    Member walk-in's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    771

    Default

    Don't waste your money on cheap optics. I can't stress that enough. You absolutely get what you pay for. If you buy something cheap, you'll end up with a headache and sore eyes if you are using it as much as you should. You'll end up not using it, and then you might as well not have it. If it was me, I'd forget about the spotting scope for now and get a decent pair of binoculars. I personally wouldn't consider anything that is less than about $700, and that will not get you a true high end pair of glasses. I know a lot of guys think they can get by with cheap binos, but if you're really going to use them you need quality. One way you may be able to save some money on optics is to take a look at surplus military binos. They will be bigger and heavier than commercial ones, and they may not have the latest and greatest glass and coatings, but there are some good quality surplus binoculars out there in the $300-$400 range.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
    James Madison

  16. #16
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,357

    Default

    Optics- I use the Pentax 10-40 waterproofs, I wear glasses, and they work terrific for me.

    Knife- Cutco Double D edge with drop point and blaze orange handle. You'll kiss the salesman when you get back, after being able to spot your knife immediately every time you set it down. I also carry a Forschner 6" Boning knife and a steel, as I got really comfie with that working at a slaughter house.

    Patience- Bull moose may spend all day within a hundred yards of you trying to get into position to see you. Wait them out.

    Have fun!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    690

    Default Congratulations, you have no idea...

    what you are in for. There's an old addage that we moose hunters have; "There's nothing that ruins a good moose hunt more than someone shooting a moose."

    ie; the WORK is like nothing you have ever experienced. You are fortunate, however, that there's a couple of others in your group. That makes things a lot better when it comes time to cape and carve. I HIGHLY recommend a roofers trimming box cutter style razor; the blades are replaceable and they make skinning the hide a heck of a lot easier than conventional gut hooks. The advantages are that they cut from underneath so you reduce hair contamination, they are replaceable and they are wicked sharp.

    Sounds like the rest of your gear is pretty well spoken for. I also recommend plenty of socks. There's nothing worse than blister and swamp foot combined to make a hike miserable (I don't hike anymore but I still bring socks).

    Your earlier comment on getting "What works for now" is not a good perspective; you will end up buying two of everything becuase you will get frustrated with the quality of the goods after one trip in the field and end up buying the good stuff later.

    Pick up the "Love, Thunder & Bull 2" from your local box store and watch it over and over and over. This will catapult you into a more knowledgeable moose hunter and you may even impress your new father-in-law after you learn how to do a good cow call. The one thing that I have noticed is that shorter, softer call is more effective than what they do on the DVD.

    I also believe that SOME noise is better than NO noise when I walk; animals make their own sounds in the wilderness and moose have very keen hearing. If you have a partner that you're walking with, try to stagger your gait so that you sound like a moose... walk about 10 steps and pause and listen, pull on a willow and a minute later do it again. Moose have a comfort factor when not rutting and they also have a defense factor while rutting; you can't lose with this tactic unless you don't do it right.

    And last but not least; PAY ATTENTION TO WHAT OTHERS ARE DOING. You can learn volumes by just watching and listening to the other more experienced hunters in your group. Absorb everything and retain as much as you can.


    Good luck!
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

  18. #18
    Member powderhound's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Valley
    Posts
    297

    Default

    Alright you guys are great! Alot of great tips so far to help me out there. My latest question would be concerning SOCKS.
    What kind do you prefer? Your feet are your transportation, so what have you found to help reduce blisters and the such. I will be wearing my xtra tuff boots. That is what the other guys in camp have had the best luck with. What kind of sock do you recommend. I will be in the 20A area. What kind of temps should I expect during the night and day? Bring my insulated gear?
    I will be flying in on a plane, so I would like to keep the unnecessary gear at the house if possible. Thanks again.

    9I really still dont know exactly how to sight in my rifle yet. figured the fine folks out at the birchwood range might help me out there when I show up confussed! well hopefullY!!!!

  19. #19
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I like merino wool. There are many available some are more durable than others but I don't have a real specific preference. I hate the poly junk and cotton is a losing proposition in any AK outdoor garment. Some of the merino poly hybrids are realy nice because they help it keep the proper shape. Lot of positive reviews on the costco merino wool socks and the price is impossible to beat

  20. #20
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by powderhound View Post
    Alright you guys are great! Alot of great tips so far to help me out there. My latest question would be concerning SOCKS.
    What kind do you prefer? Your feet are your transportation, so what have you found to help reduce blisters and the such. I will be wearing my xtra tuff boots. That is what the other guys in camp have had the best luck with. What kind of sock do you recommend. I will be in the 20A area. What kind of temps should I expect during the night and day? Bring my insulated gear?
    I will be flying in on a plane, so I would like to keep the unnecessary gear at the house if possible. Thanks again.

    9I really still dont know exactly how to sight in my rifle yet. figured the fine folks out at the birchwood range might help me out there when I show up confussed! well hopefullY!!!!
    SOCKS!!!!!!!!???????????


    oh no! NOT on your FIRST hunt...

    you have to do the manly bare foot stalk...it is required

    AS.345.27p(i)34.2q(n)(d1) states that sub sections (n) and (d1) all new to hunting moose with father in law persons...must [follow] be led, into the field with out proper required foot wear. under sub minus section of the following AS.398.us.23/r(q) no socks allowed clause...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •