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Thread: Waterproof stuff/storage sacks

  1. #1
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Question Waterproof stuff/storage sacks

    What do I need to know about these. I've been looking at them and can't make a good judgement of them, mainly because of my ignorance on the subject. They seem as if they would make life a little easier in the field, but not sure. They also seem a little heavy. Anybody use them? Care to comment?

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    I use them all the time, on fly outs and float trips. Several reasons, I use a number of them to protect everything and to organize it. We've often landed in the rain and the bags keep everything dry during our camp set up. They may, or may not, cut down on scent from the food bags. Not everything will fit in the tent and again, the bags keep the contents dry. Definitely makes things easier and as for the weight, a little heavier then nylon or cotton bags but the extra protection and keeping the contents dry is worth it. Especially if you are floating on a river during the rain or something unforeseen happens and your raft gets a ton of water in it. A dry sleeping bag is way better then a wet one, even a wet Wiggy's bag.

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    I have a waterproof compression sack for my sleeping bag (the brand escapes me) and I use Seattle Sports waterproof gear bags. I bought a couple of multiple, mixed size sets a few years ago. I've yet to be disappointed by any of them. They work perfectly and they're very durable. I don't baby them.

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    Dry bags are great on certain types of hunts where weight is not a factor. I have one I've used for years on my atv, boat, etc.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Default Sea to Summit

    You might take a look at these....

    I have not used them but have been toying with the idea... They look great. Saw them in Cabelas too...

    http://www.seatosummit.com/products/cat/3

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Sea to Summit are the brand I was looking at too. They seem to be less weight than some of the other...but that could say something about there durablility too. I'll wait to see if anyone has anything to say about their experience with them.

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    Me and a couple buddies picked up some from Sportsmans Warehouse for our Pen Bear hunt this past spring. I got the big one, that has backpack straps on it, they had them in camo it was like $59 for the big one and its now something that goes in my boat for clothes in case it rains and I dont want certain stuff to get wet.

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    I use dry bags all the time, even on hike in hunts. They are a little heavier but sleeping in a dry sleeping bag with dry clothes to put on is worth it. I have all kinds of sizes from a small one for wallets, cameras, etc up to a large one that I can put 2 sleeping bags and a tent into. backpacks and duffel style.

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    Default Sealine

    Drybags are a must have for Alaska. I prefer the Sealine products. I've used them exclusivly and watched some friends tryout different products only to be dissappointed. I started calling his bags s.o.g.gy bags, made by Seattle Outdoors Gear. We use our stuff nearly every weekend along with 3-4 week long trips per year. The Sealine stuff is a little more expensive but worth it in my opinion. The bag I use the most is the Boundary bag It is the biggest bag they make I believe and will fit my Wiggy bag (Flexible temp range system), Mountain Hardwear 2 man 3 season, Thermarest and still have room for extra clothes, jetboil etc. Check'em out.

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    Default Sealine

    Good evening,

    I also have Sealine bags and Dom's Outdoor Outfitter had a pretty good price when I was in the market for them. You might want to check out the following link:
    http://domsoutdoor.com/article.asp?a...cd2=1164002598

  11. #11
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Outdoor Research

    I used these on my sheep hunt and they worked great. One for my North Face Orion sleeping bag and the other for my clothes. They were always dry and they compress well..

    http://www.orgear.com/home/style/hom...stuffsacks/HDS

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Dry Bags

    Buck Nut-

    You might also have a look at the Northwest River Supplies bags. You should be able to get your sleeping bag and pad in a Bill's 2.2 and the rest of your stuff in a Bill's 3.8. These two bags have backpack straps on them which makes it really handy if you have to portage. I've never had trouble with them.

    They also make other sizes and configurations that work well for tents, odd-sized gear and even for your food. I use a KOSS bag for my crushable foods like bread, etc. You can put a couple of apple boxes inside next to each other for structural support. They work great. Also with large groups, the KOSS bag is excellent as a large bag for everyone's sleeping bags.

    A tip on using these for sleeping bags; don't use your stuff sack. Just roll your sleeping pad and put it in the dry bag, then stuff your sleeping bag into the dry bag. Saves a lot of time.

    Finally, you might try a "poor man's dry bag"; a mesh grain sack lined with a trash compactor bag. I use this for most of my food, my game bags /cordage, etc. The grain sacks cost about a buck apiece in Anchorage at Alaska Mill and Feed. Slip the trash bag into the other sack, fill it up, twist the top back on itself and tie it off with parachute cord (don't use duct tape or you'll rip the trash bag when you open it). Then tie the grain sack shut with parachute cord and you have a rugged bag that's cheap, light and will hold up even when you ship your gear as air freight.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default

    I use old military chemical warfare bags. They are a bit lighter than the commercial ones and take a minute to tie but work great.

  14. #14

    Default NRS

    I really like the NRS bags. VERY tough and have had no problems.

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default Conclusions...

    "Buck Nut" - finally, someone that knows the real me! Cute Michael!

    Anyways, I have done lots of looking and have come to a conclusion of my own concerning waterproof bags. I noticed that some of you spoke of "heavy duty" bags and others spoke of "lightweight" bags. Took to looking at them in the store (I am generally good with visualizing, but always helps to get my hands on the stuff) and found two major differences. 1. Weight and durability(appeared, I have no actual experience) and 2. Sealing capability (again, appeared). My conclusion is that I will purchase one of the heavy duty bags like Michael spoke of and a set of lightweight bags. The Heavy, more durable bag will accompany me on trips that something bigger and stronger than I will be carrying the weight (ie, wheeler), I can stuff everything in, seal it up, and call it good. The lightweight bags that I looked at (sea to summit and cabelas) were extremely light, did not look to be too durable (but would work great for packing individual items in a pack), and I am a little concerned about their ability to seal out the water (but not a huge issue since I am looking for something to simply protect from rain, not going to be drowning it in any rivers). Haven't settled on any one brand yet, will figure that out soon enough. OH, and I do like the grain sack idea...much stronger than the old black trash bag I've been using!

    Thanks for your replies, you've truly been a big help.
    "Buck Nut"

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Dry bags now serve many functions....all useful...

    The newest innovations I've seen are clear, see-through dry bags.
    But other useful features as already listed are organizing gear, compressing gear... and keeping stuff dry.

    We always pack sleeping gear in a dry bag, usually double wrapped. We vacuum seal some gear, emergency gear or extra clothes.

    Good thread.

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Default not much heavier

    I recently got a couple Sealine bags for our canoe, sealed up the essentials and then some, all kinds of extra clothes, etc. tied em down underneath canoe seats for additional flotation then we did some practice capsizing and recovery of the canoe,(just off the beach but they were definitely tested) they leaked not a drop. For some reason after several days there was no condensation inside either, which I can hardly believe and may still be an issue to be aware of, but our stuff was totally dry after ten days of being,"out there."

    They don't seem very heavy, look like they would be, but empty they are pretty light and are definitely very durable. I really like 'em. Kind of as stuff bags (not so great for organization) but for a Heavy Weather hunt these seem to be a great solution to wondering if your stuff will make it dry.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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