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Thread: CANNING SOUP HELP!!!!!!!!!how do I???????

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default CANNING SOUP HELP!!!!!!!!!how do I???????

    okay.. i am a really good cook,, ( not to toot my horn, i just am)... i make soups and chowders all the time and want to make several batches for moose camp... this year. as it appears we will be on the road for it


    how do you CAN SOUP? can i sea it like a veggie in a hot bath or do i cook it in the canner... ??

    calm chowder will be my nemesis on this one... cause i make a BASHING crashing Great chowder!!... but wont have them breaking on me later...


    ideas thought S.. if i just cook it then can it in a hot bath... suggestions on times? longevity? etc


    thanks
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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Vince,
    Wife and I have canned a bunch of soups/stews/chili etc. in the pressure canner with a lot of success but nothing cream based. I'm thinking Manhattan chowder would be a piece of cake but New England style has a few wrinkles.

    A water bath canner would not work all that good for that- gotta be high acid/high sugar food for water bath canning. Think tomatoes, think pickles, think fruit- don't think clams.

    Check out the Ball website or page 61 of the Ball Blue Book (if you have one handy) for a recipe for canning New England Clam Chowder Base. They specifically tell you not to add the milk and butter during the canning process. I'm guessing the milk would do bad, bad things in a jar inside a pressure canner (curdle, heck turn to cheese for all I know).

    Apparently you make the "base" in the canner and then when you cook it in camp add the milk and butter... powdered milk would probably be just fine. Not quite as easy as opening a can of Campbells but probably a lot better.

    Let me know how it turns out if you try it.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    Vince,
    Wife and I have canned a bunch of soups/stews/chili etc. in the pressure canner with a lot of success but nothing cream based. I'm thinking Manhattan chowder would be a piece of cake but New England style has a few wrinkles.

    A water bath canner would not work all that good for that- gotta be high acid/high sugar food for water bath canning. Think tomatoes, think pickles, think fruit- don't think clams.

    Check out the Ball website or page 61 of the Ball Blue Book (if you have one handy) for a recipe for canning New England Clam Chowder Base. They specifically tell you not to add the milk and butter during the canning process. I'm guessing the milk would do bad, bad things in a jar inside a pressure canner (curdle, heck turn to cheese for all I know).

    Apparently you make the "base" in the canner and then when you cook it in camp add the milk and butter... powdered milk would probably be just fine. Not quite as easy as opening a can of Campbells but probably a lot better.

    Let me know how it turns out if you try it.
    you know i never have had a" blue ball cook book," i will have to look to get one.


    so your saying for the most part. to add all the fresh ingredients THEN COOK IN CANNER>.. don't pre cook then can...if i am following you...

    Thanks
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    You might want to visit http://canningusa.com/ and browse their site. Lots of good info there, even if some of it is directed to selling their canning equipment. They have a blog where you might be able to post a comment or find the information you seek. The videos on the site are well done. Sorry, I didn't look for an answer to your questions specifically (and hodgeman's advice is solid, anyway), but I did note that they have a video on canning soups: http://canningusa.com/Podcasts/Podcast4.htm

    The Oregon State site has a recipe for chowder base that reiterates the point about not using milk or butter in the canning. They tell you to add the milk and butter when you serve it.

    (Interesting side note: they say to never can seafood in anything bigger than a pint jar.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    you know i never have had a" blue ball cook book," i will have to look to get one.


    so your saying for the most part. to add all the fresh ingredients THEN COOK IN CANNER>.. don't pre cook then can...if i am following you...

    Thanks
    If you have a canner you really ought to have two books in my opinion- the Ball Blue Book and The Encyclopedia of Country Living. If you can put in a jar and preserve it, those two books will have a solid recipe as well as some great advice. I take a lot of recipes off the net with a grain of salt as there is still a lot of flaky advice regarding canning but either of those books is solid.

    Yep- you'll add raw ingredients to jars and then pressure can. Food cooks in the jars and there are different times for different things but meats are typically upwards of an hour or more. With chowder you'll add milk and butter when you serve. So you'll cook "part one"( the clams, potatoes, etc.) in the canner as a base or starter and when you cook it in camp you'll take the base you've made and add milk and butter during the reheat then serve.

    If you make a mean moose stew it will be easier- you can make it in one operation (in the canner) and just heat and eat in camp. Good luck!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    cool thanks guys all i have ever used the canner for is fish and maeat scraps for dog food... i am off to find the books!!
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    Thumbs up


    Pints 60* min 11 lb 12 lb 13 lb 14 lb


    that makes sence... i knew it was not the full 110 min at 10 lbs.....

    but they are useing canned clams i think,,,, so maybe i should do that first then........
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    You may want to check out AOD Sponsor www.backwoodshome.com. Jackie Clay is the queen of canning and has tons of recipes for meals in a can. Definitely better than Mountain House!

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Didn't even remember BHM magazine- also a good resource for canning information. Thanks for the catch Corn!

    I didn't realize they even had a web site, I'll have to check it out.
    Also a book entitled Putting Food By is a good one as well.

    I'm really interested in hearing how a chowder base turns out if you try it Vince.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    calm chowder will be my nemesis on this one... cause i make a BASHING crashing Great chowder!!... but wont have them breaking on me later...


    ideas thought S.. if i just cook it then can it in a hot bath... suggestions on times? longevity? etc


    thanks

    My thoughts would be to do this: make the chowder with the milk, freeze it in indiviual containers or serving size of your choice, once it is frozen, I would then use the vacuum packer to seal it up air tight. Then when your at camp, take it out of the cooler, place the vacuum pack bag into a pot of water and bring to a boil. No fuss, no pans to clean up (just throw the water out and your done). I have made home made enchilladas and have done this while at deer camp, and it is amazing what you can do with your leftovers from your everyday meals. Hope this helps.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    well the first batch of chowder turned out so well it is all gone..

    this week i am taking the Bear ham i just smoked and turning the small end in to ham and beans.. i prefer navy bean....thanks for the link to the BHM!!! lots of good infor there in the search fuction.
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  12. #12

    Default Hey mfletcher

    THat is how I have started doing lots of my camping foods or on the boat. After about 4 days you have to have something else because by then our coolers have thawed. I got the same information about not adding the milk and butter form other sources. I am thinking of the smoked salmon chowder would be great canned. I haven't tried it yet but am thinkin it would be great at hunting camp. I would think it would have to be like 90 mins for pints and 100 at least for qts since that is how long it takes for smoked salmon. Happy canning

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    well the first batch of chowder turned out so well it is all gone..
    Vince, glad it turned out well. Would you mind posting the recipe of how you finally did it? I'm curious enough now to try it...

    On a side note- I enjoyed some canned bison vegetable soup while in caribou camp over the weekend. Good and EASY!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    well glad i found this thread agian..


    just finished 20qts of chowder today...

    started with ~ 6 lb potatoes. peeled yukons and some reds unpeeld
    3 large onion one of which is red
    1 lb hole kerrnel corn
    ~3lbs razor clams
    ~2lbs halibut
    ~1.5lbs fresh shirmp
    1 lb bacon
    ~1/2 lb fake crab meat
    1 bunch parsely
    1 bunch fresh cilantro
    lemon pepper to taste
    kosher salt to taste
    dill to taste
    3 cups chardoney white wine
    chicken stock/ water...about ... that much


    hold sea food back till veggies start to tender
    add sea food. and simmer 15 min to season all together..

    at this point i remove canned parts and add to quart jars


    reminder of chowder gets 1 cube butter and 4 cans evopo milk. warmed then thickend with flour rue.. (this gives us nearly 1.5 gallon on the stove)
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  15. #15

    Default canning

    go online to masonjars.com
    they will tell you everything you need to know

    wife said if you are canning soup with tomatoes(acid) then all you need to do is hot water bath she always adds extra acid(lemon juice and lemon zest to hers veg soups, sure does make it taste good), quart size for 30 min
    anything with protein you must use a pressure cooker and follow the mason jar company formular, she adds acid to the meat based soups(lemon juice )

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    Canning soups is awesome! Especially ones with beans in them. I can a lot of dry beans for side dishes, but bean soups when canned are phenomenal. Soak the beans overnight, and rinse. (Use a ratio of quantities that are used to using for single meals and double, triple, etc.) Start adding your onions, celery, carrots, and whatever else you like using. Ground meat is GREAT to add. Most recipes say to cook for about half an hour or so before you put it in the canner. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don't, but it is always hot when I pack the jars. Spice as you would normally, and can pints for 90 mins at 10 lbs and quarts10 lbs at 100 mins (?). (I think). try experimenting before you go on your hunting trip. Then when you go, you can seriously impress your buddies! Another wonderful stew we do uses "pulled" meat. Pressure cook some meat or meat on the bone (if its a smaller animal, like a deer, not a moose) and then use that meat in your stew. Add some veggies, spices (cumin, garlic), tomato paste, and soaked beans. Its the BEST! I've made chili successfully too. Have fun with it! I sure do. Just make sure its pressure canned for the appropriate time!

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