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Thread: Sheep Hunting Boots

  1. #1

    Question Sheep Hunting Boots

    I've been reading whats posted here for a few years now and I think I've seen most, if not all post concerning sheep hunting boots. My problem is that I have spent a small fortune over the years trying to find mountain boots that fit. I have been cursed with very narrow, high arched feet. I've been to Alaska twice to hunt so far and have lost toenails on both trips from waders that are imposible to make fit properly. I can survive the waders I think, for the wet country hunting OK but I have a sheep hunt booked for 2011. What I have decided to do is bite the bullet and have a pair of custom made boots built. My question for all of you experienced sheep hunters is; what height boots are exceptable? Most of the makers I have found only offer a boot that is approximately 6" high. Is this high enough? Any advise would be helpfull.

  2. #2

    Default Be Careful

    Trailspace has a review from a hiker who spent 2500 for van gorkum custom boots. They didn't work.

    Find a boot that fits and go with it- My advice. Hoffman boots or AGBrooks.
    I can wear anything. I like the Hanwags.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  3. #3
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Most of the leather sheep boots we sell at Barneys are 8-10". That said if they'll fit you the Scarpa Liskamm is an OUTSTANDING mountain hunting boot.

    Brett

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by ohhunter1 View Post
    I've been reading whats posted here for a few years now and I think I've seen most, if not all post concerning sheep hunting boots. My problem is that I have spent a small fortune over the years trying to find mountain boots that fit. I have been cursed with very narrow, high arched feet. I've been to Alaska twice to hunt so far and have lost toenails on both trips from waders that are imposible to make fit properly. I can survive the waders I think, for the wet country hunting OK but I have a sheep hunt booked for 2011. What I have decided to do is bite the bullet and have a pair of custom made boots built. My question for all of you experienced sheep hunters is; what height boots are exceptable? Most of the makers I have found only offer a boot that is approximately 6" high. Is this high enough? Any advise would be helpfull.
    If it is guided hunt find out what your guide recommends. If he is wearing hip boots and your leather boots are six inches high might make for a pretty rough hunt.
    Good Luck
    Joe (Ak)

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    Member Hogcrewer's Avatar
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    Default Koflach

    I bought a pair of Koflach a couple of years ago and love the hell out of them. I will take the pack's out of them and put the plastic shells back on and cross creek's and streams with them. Can say enough about these boots. They give great ankle support when you have a full bag. Awesome boot....Just my two cents.

  6. #6
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wantj43 View Post
    If it is guided hunt find out what your guide recommends. If he is wearing hip boots and your leather boots are six inches high might make for a pretty rough hunt.
    Good Luck
    Joe (Ak)
    there is one i can do... the alpine are the hard ones for me...


    where can i hunt sheep in hip boots?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  7. #7

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    I wasn't sheep hunting on the two previous trips. that was moose and brown bear and hip waders were definitely needed. I wish you could get to sheep in waders. At least I would know for sure what I was in for.
    The problem with all the boots mentioned thus far is that they are not offered in a narrow enough width. I've tried in the past all kind of footbeads, insoles, tongue pads, you name it. I'm looking at custom made as a last resort.
    Last edited by ohhunter1; 08-09-2009 at 20:32. Reason: incomplete post

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    The Lowa brand seems to run narrow. Have you tried any of their offerings?

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    For narrow boots try LaSportiva.

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    You need to go into a good shop and get fitted. If they don't spend about an hour with you then you did not spend enough time. Each brand will have a different fit. I look for boots that have a stiff sole and ankle and rubber that comes well up from the sole to protect the leather from cuts. I do not care about gore tex and prefer a boot with as few seams as possible. Other than that I try on a lot of boots and insoles until I get a combo that works. Right now those are Scarpa Mantas and SOLE insoles that were heat formed.

  11. #11
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chisana View Post
    You need to go into a good shop and get fitted. If they don't spend about an hour with you then you did not spend enough time. Each brand will have a different fit. I look for boots that have a stiff sole and ankle and rubber that comes well up from the sole to protect the leather from cuts. I do not care about gore tex and prefer a boot with as few seams as possible. Other than that I try on a lot of boots and insoles until I get a combo that works. Right now those are Scarpa Mantas and SOLE insoles that were heat formed.

    Try the Liskamm!!!! I just bought a pair and wow!!! They meet all your criterion and then some!!! For a mountain hunting boot they are above the Lowas, and WAAAAYYY above Danner if the modern Danners can even be called mountain hunting boots. I had a kid come in the shop with a new pair of Danners recently. I was nothing short of appaulled!!!! They were garbage!!! He paid big bucks for crap!!! He tried on liskamms and his response was well now I have a good pair of work boots. He wore the Scarpas out. The ankle support and sole ridgidity are as close as you can get to a plastic boot in leather. Some people complain they weigh more, but who cares. As a chiropractor I can speak intelligently on this. Your muscles are use to forward locamotion. You put on step after another all day long. No big deal even if your feet are a little heavier than normal. What is a big deal is when your calves and muscles in the foot have to continually work hard to toe and side hill in a "light" boot. Those muscles are not use to that stress and will fatigue much faster in these activities than normal forward locamotion with heavy boots that support you when toeing and side hilling.

    Brett

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    Default water proofing

    so after you buy the boots what products are you guys using to ensure that they stay water proof year after year? what particular products? where do you buy them? how do you apply? hook me up with the whole story...and I will appreciate any suggestions.

  13. #13
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    nixwax aquous wax. Works great without damaging the waterproof membrane

  14. #14
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Don't EVER EVER EVER use wax on gortex boots!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It clogs the gortex and it fails to function!!!! Use a spray on or gell with gortex!!! I use Revivex on my Scarpa Liskamms. When you get home take the laces out, remove as much dirt as you can with a brush, and apply the gell with a rag. You want to make sure it's a water sealer and leather conditioner. The conditioner keeps the leather supple so it doesn't dry out and crack. Drying out causes the leather to lose some of the water proofing chemicals from the tanning process.

    Brett

  15. #15
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Good info on the no wax front Brett. However if that was in response to my suggestion then I reccommend some research before response.



    Sponge-on waterproofing for full-grain leather

    Waterproofs, maintains support and breathability. Colours available: neutral, brown and black






    Benefits of using this product
    • Adds water repellency
    • Prolongs life and performance of all smooth leather footwear
    • Maintains breathability
    • Ideal for footwear with breathable linings e.g. Gore-Tex
    • Can be used on wet footwear
    • Easy to apply. Can be used indoors unlike solvent based sprays
    • Will not over soften leather
    • WaterBased - environmentally friendly, biodegradable, non flammable, non hazardous







    Ideal for
    • All full grain leather footwear (work, fashion, leisure and sports)
    • Safe to use on footwear with breathable membranes e.g. Gore-Tex, SympaTex, eVENT etc
    I was shocked that at the end of last season (way over 100 miles) I tossed on a coat of this to my Kennetreks and they literally looked brand new!

  16. #16
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    I'll check on that, but I'm pretty darn sure.

    Brett

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