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Thread: Questions on De-Boneing

  1. #1
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    Default Questions on De-Boneing

    So my question is if anybody de-bones before the game has left the field? I am mainly talking about Moose or Caribou. What does leaving the bone in until the meat has been takin out of the field offer?

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default bone in

    i opt leave the bone in.....i can put alot more boned out meat in my bag before i decide its too heavy....where as a moose hind quarter in itself is just about right...also i believe you have to trim less off when processing, since less surface area is exposed to airfor long periods...plus bone in quarters tend to lose body heat more readily than a big bag of cut up meat....the only animals i have ever boned out are sheep...mostly because i was solo on the hunt and pounds of bones is pounds i didn't want to carry......thats my penny's worth anyhow
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by watkinsba View Post
    So my question is if anybody de-bones before the game has left the field? I am mainly talking about Moose or Caribou. What does leaving the bone in until the meat has been takin out of the field offer?
    The only time I will de-bone anything is when weight is a serious factor. What de-boning ends up doing is exposing more meat to being dried out or contaminated by whatever means. The less meat you have exposed until you are in a good, reliably clean area, the better condition the meat will remain in. When the meat is exposed to the air, like when you are hanging it to age it, the surface dries out. Most people will trim off the "crust" and either toss that or maybe use it for dog food or something like that. The more meat surface exposed, the more dried meat you get and the more waste you end up with.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    agreed with all the above... and that some units REQUIRE the meat left on the bone

    mine stays on
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member dieNqvrs's Avatar
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    I debone most of my animals if I am leaving an area before long. I personally learned along time ago that I can make one less trip on a big animal if i take the time to debone. It does have the disadvantages the others have mentioned but I generally don't hang my meat unless on an extended bush trip where that is the only option. I generally gut the animal and if possible move it away from the guts to afford me a little time if a brown bear come in. I then skin one side keeping it clean and take a quarter off. I use the clean skin as a cutting board/tarp and break the quarter down and leave all the bones, fat and other tendions and such putting all meat in a game bag. I continue on the same side with other quarter and strap, and then flip over and repeat. I then get back to mode of transportation and spread out meat to cool off. After it is cool I generally cut and process it up within a day. I generally don't have the problems others have associated with deboning if a few precautions are taken and not waiting to process. Both have their advantages and dis-advantages, pick the one that suits you and your situation.

    Also keep in mind who is carrying the load. Many younger or smaller hunters and huntress' can't carry a full hind moose quarter bone in.

    One other note many units require it left on the bone simply for prior waste of the resource and keeping meat better if it is on the bone for longer periods of time such as bush flight and raft trips.

    Good luck and have fun
    Last edited by dieNqvrs; 08-07-2009 at 09:42. Reason: sp

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    If the laws allow it I always debone at the kill. There is a minor potenital of contaminating the meat by exposing more of it to oxygen but if the weather is cool and the meat hung immediately I never experienced it.
    Deboning also permits the meat to cool quicker and will also do away with a condition called "sour round" in the hind quarters. This is when liquids collect around the joints which allows bacteria to grow.
    Tennessee

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    Default My .02

    I have deboned most of my moose because it has to be backpacked a ways usually. When its on my back for a mile to get to the plane, the bones stay. If you take care of it, it doesn't get any dirtier. It's one vertical cut down the bone and peel the meat back. The quarter is already in the gamebag at the point of de-boning too, so no added dirt. De-boned probably more than I kept the bone in and I don't believe there is any meat loss or added dirt, but I am extremely careful with my moose meat too. No saws, so no bone chips, etc. Everything with a knife. (Seen some horrible looking meat with hair and grass/dirt all over it or chainsaw cut meat....Cant speak for that)

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    Member BIGAKSTUFF's Avatar
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    Man, a moose hind-quarter on the back is quite a chore, i have had to haul a moose out for about a mile and a half one way before(thank god i had some good help)...........if i could have boned it out legally, i would have. But after seeing those quarters hanging, it was worth it. It was a pain in the butt to have to process the back straps/neck meat/ect right away, because there isn't a good way to hang them. And hanging it is the key in my mind, age it a little bit and it will taste better. Boning out a Caribou shouldn't even be on your mind, after taking care of a moose, caribou hind quarters look *cute*.

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    Default Over here

    We have been taught to bone out the meat in the field if possible. Partly to save weight when you're packing it out but also to prevent the meat spoiling due to heat retention in the meat close to the bone. Having said that I have had to carry deer out whole in the past and it was common when there were commercial meat hunters operating.

  10. #10

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    I debone rib meat when I can, but I keep the quarters on the bone, even on moose. I've read that it is important to leave on the bone because it prevents the muscle fibers from contracting. They need to relax for 24 hours before being removed, it improves tenderness. I let them age on the bone too.

    I remove rib meat and neck meat because it is going to become burger.

    Now, on this goat hunt this fall, I am deboning the goat because I want to come down in one load between the two of us.

    Just my thoughts

  11. #11
    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BIGAKSTUFF View Post
    It was a pain in the butt to have to process the back straps/neck meat/ect right away, because there isn't a good way to hang them. And hanging it is the key in my mind, age it a little bit and it will taste better.
    I 'hang' my straps/tenderloins etc in my fridge on a rack over a pan..quite a bit of blood drips out in a few days...I do have to carefully cut off a slight crust but what's left melts like butter in your mouth...
    ------------------------------------------------
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  12. #12
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    I dont de-bone anyting, my wife does.

    Shes wicked fast with her ulu.


    I do skin, gut and break them down to small loads.Often I remove the neck in front of the ribcage , strip the backstrap/ribs and cut off the pelvis(if its skinny, Ill strip the pelvic as well), leaving the head and backbone behind

    I remove the forlegs and back legs at the joint going up from the ankle; feel up the shin/backleg, untill you feel the first "bump"of bone, below the joint. Cut completly around that joint and snap it to the side, it will leave you with a clean forearm joint and I make a cut from the joint to the "Elbow" (on a human) and make a handhold to carry with.On the back leg I make the cut and then cut a slice between the tendon and the meat and have a great handhold/hang up place on the rear leg.

    That dryed meat thats getting cut off is 1/2 dry jerky.
    If you do ,indeed , cut it off, Salt and pepper the wet side and hang on a line or pole, out of the sun in a windybreezy place, you'll be glad you did.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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  13. #13

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    If it's a decent walk I'd probably want to debone. If I won't be leaving for a few days, I'll leave it on the bone and debone the day before I leave.

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    Great input. So as long as I quarter and once it is back at camp and has cooled I could then De-Bone just before I depart from the field or before I have it hauled out from the field.

    Thanks Again

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I may debone before a long hike but even then probably not. I do strip the ribs though and it all gets ground up along w/ the neck meat. For big moose you can save some money at the processor if you debone before turning over your meat. No reason to pay for the weight of stuff you can't eat!

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I may debone before a long hike but even then probably not. I do strip the ribs though and it all gets ground up along w/ the neck meat. For big moose you can save some money at the processor if you debone before turning over your meat. No reason to pay for the weight of stuff you can't eat!
    Actually my processor charges more to have to deal with boned out meat. They'd rather make their cuts on getting the meat off the bone as they do a much better job than I would anyways.

  17. #17
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    I dont de-bone anyting, my wife does.

    Shes wicked fast with her ulu.


    I do skin, gut and break them down to small loads.Often I remove the neck in front of the ribcage , strip the backstrap/ribs and cut off the pelvis(if its skinny, Ill strip the pelvic as well), leaving the head and backbone behind

    I remove the forlegs and back legs at the joint going up from the ankle; feel up the shin/backleg, untill you feel the first "bump"of bone, below the joint. Cut completly around that joint and snap it to the side, it will leave you with a clean forearm joint and I make a cut from the joint to the "Elbow" (on a human) and make a handhold to carry with.On the back leg I make the cut and then cut a slice between the tendon and the meat and have a great handhold/hang up place on the rear leg.

    That dryed meat thats getting cut off is 1/2 dry jerky.
    If you do ,indeed , cut it off, Salt and pepper the wet side and hang on a line or pole, out of the sun in a windybreezy place, you'll be glad you did.
    i agree with stranger........and bone out whenever possible. contamination hasn't been a problem, as i cloth-bag everything. weight savings is huge, and transport is that much easier.
    happy trails.
    jh

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