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Thread: Which Remington barrel for slugs?

  1. #1

    Default Which Remington barrel for slugs?

    Hello All-

    I don't want to bore anyone with another bear-shotgun thread, but I really can't find the specific information I'm looking for through searches.

    I own an Rem. 870 with 28" barrel, interchangeable chokes. I'm looking at getting a barrel for shooting brenneke slugs, and what I'm wondering is:

    Should I get a:

    1. 20-21" Deer Rifle Sighted with Improved Cylinder choke
    2. 18" cylinder bore, with bead sight (no rib)
    3. Something Else

    I think I can work out my own personal preference, what I'm wondering about is actual functional (safety, accuracy, velocity) differences between them. My understanding is that anything with improved cylinder (or bigger) choke will work (inc. my current 28"), it's mostly a matter of handling...is that right?

    Thanks very much for the information!

    Travis

  2. #2
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiPlainsDrifter View Post
    I own an Rem. 870 with 28" barrel, interchangeable chokes. I'm looking at getting a barrel for shooting brenneke slugs, and what I'm wondering is:

    Should I get a:

    1. 20-21" Deer Rifle Sighted with Improved Cylinder choke
    2. 18" cylinder bore, with bead sight (no rib)
    3. Something Else

    Thanks very much for the information!

    Travis
    My normal gun to keep in the boat and around camp is a trusted 12 ga 870 with a 20" IC smoothbore barrel with rifle sights. While it's no tack driver, I've no difficulty hitting soda cans at 50 yards with it (I've used Brenneke, Winchester & Remington slugs) and that is accurate enough for my purposes. I do not think most people will be able to shoot that accurately with just a bead front sight so I would recommend you opt for some type of adjustable sights. It is a great gun for camp: sufficiently accurate, adequately powerful, and reliable to a fault.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    All slugs will pass though a full choke.If you will be just shooting slugs use smooth bore,sabots use rifled. When useing a fixed choke barrel I like mod as its good for slugs,buck and also gives a good pattern for bird shot so you cover all bases with one barrel. 1Cor 15:19's I/C is also a good choice but mod gives about ten more yards of useing pattern with birdshot

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    Remington sells a 18" or 20" (both, actually) barrel with sights for slugs. I believe this is a cylinder bore, no restriction. Whether this cylinder bore is the best for slugs or not I cannot say for sure but I have seen many of them that are very accurate. I have an 870 3"x20" barrel with sights, but no 870. This barrel resides in another state and would be difficult to get to for a month or so. I also have an old 2 3/4" Ithaca M&P gun with 18" smooth with cylinder marked barrel, with rather crude sights. It will group about 3" at 25 yards and that's as good as I can see.

    The 870 is a very popular shotgun and barrels are available through the mail when you decide what you want. There is a strong market for the tactical shotgun and barrels. These may have only a front post and use a rear aperature receiver mounted. That would be a more accurate gun to shoot for me, with the peep or ghost ring rear. They also make a deer hunters slug barrel with sights like on the Remingotn M700, that may be better for some. Get on their web site and scope out what they have.
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  5. #5
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
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    Default slug barrel

    I grew up in southwestern Minnesota, and there are no rifle seasons- only muzzleloader and slugs for deer. I grew up hunting deer with an 870 and a smooth bore slug barrel with rifle sights- Between my Dad, 2 brothers and I we have taken a truckload of deer with that setup. We almost always used federal 2 3/4" 1oz foster slugs. Plenty accurate out to 75yds for deer and hit like a mack truck. I have never used a rifled slug barrel, so i cant comment on that, but rifled barrels use saboted bullets like a fast twist muzzleloader. IMHO, I would rather have the smooth slug barrel with a big chunk of lead if i were planning on using it for a defense piece. The slugs are much cheaper to buy too.

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    From choices given and the slug you are going to use, #1 would be my first choice. You are using it for bear protection and that means close range, Saboted slugs and rifled bears are great but not needed for the close in stuff you intend.
    Murphy, if you ever get that barrel and wish to part with it, let me know.

  7. #7
    Member Eastwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiPlainsDrifter View Post
    Hello All-

    I don't want to bore anyone with another bear-shotgun thread, but I really can't find the specific information I'm looking for through searches.

    I own an Rem. 870 with 28" barrel, interchangeable chokes. I'm looking at getting a barrel for shooting brenneke slugs, and what I'm wondering is:

    Should I get a:

    1. 20-21" Deer Rifle Sighted with Improved Cylinder choke
    2. 18" cylinder bore, with bead sight (no rib)
    3. Something Else

    I think I can work out my own personal preference, what I'm wondering about is actual functional (safety, accuracy, velocity) differences between them. My understanding is that anything with improved cylinder (or bigger) choke will work (inc. my current 28"), it's mostly a matter of handling...is that right?

    Thanks very much for the information!

    Travis
    #1...........improved cylinder is usually best for rifled type slugs (brenneke or foster type)

  8. #8

    Default bead

    My 870 runs a remington 20" tube with adjustable front and rear sights...cylinder bore...10" 100y groups with 3" brenneke black magics...accurate enough to drop a caribou when I happen upon one...Though, If I were to buy a new barrel for a strictly "bear gun" I would probably get an 18" cyl bore with a bead sight, the rifle sights (even with tritium inserts) can be a bit slow to accurately acquire when rushed. My thoughts are a bead is much more instinctual.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethell View Post
    If I were to buy a new barrel for a strictly "bear gun" I would probably get an 18" cyl bore with a bead sight, the rifle sights (even with tritium inserts) can be a bit slow to accurately acquire when rushed. My thoughts are a bead is much more instinctual.
    I agree . . . cheek weld, front bead, pull trigger, and thatís it. Hard to beat a bead for close in fast moving targets. Even with handguns itís often taught to forget the rear sight and use the front sort of as a bead on fast close moving targets.
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    Default Slugs and barrels

    The Remchoke rifled choke does improve accuracy out of my 870 running a 20" Rem smooth bore barrel..

    This includes slugs to bore diameter and those in wads such as the 525 grain Lyman diabolo style slug. While not as aggressive a choke as the Paradox , it can definitely improve the stability of the round.

    The rifled choke dates back to Fosbery and the Paradox where a 730 grain 12 bore slug in this ball and shot rifle could print groups under 3 inches at 100 yards. Here the slug was about 0.001 less in diameter to slide through the smooth bore until it hit the rifled choke, swaged down and rotated with 1:36 " rifling. About 1025 fps at muzzle.

    An ounce or more slug from a 12 bore is a killer... even for Cape.

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