Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Bird dog question

  1. #1
    Member ironartist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Meadow Lakes
    Posts
    1,182

    Default Bird dog question

    This is not the typical question, wrong type of dog and bird both. There's something about my german shepard pup and CHICKENS. Any thoughts exept for tying a chicken around his neck till he don't like them any more. He needs some lessons, any thoughts?
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
    "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
    Μολών λαβέ

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default Is he killing them?

    Without more info, I'll give the following advice. But do fill us in on the specifics as to what is happening.
    Avoidance training is a possibility. A group does the same thing with porcupines. They get a permit to catch a porky, cage it, set it out, get a dog and put an E-collar on him, and when he gets close they nick him with the collar.
    The idea is to make it very uncomfortable for the dog to get close to the target.
    You could do the same thing. Keep in mind electricity does have its issues. Dogs react differently. I would not do it on my own if I had no collar experience.
    I would set it all up in a controlled area, such as a fenced yard. I'd have the dog on a good collar and lead that he could not slip. Put the chicken in an cage that the dog can see into, but not get to the bird, and let the dog out. When he shows interest, he gets nicked.
    Progress from there. Take him to the bird pen. If he gets close, nick him. Open the door, if he goes in, same deal.
    Get him to the point that if a chicken walks in front of him, he turns away. Do the same thing the next day, and the next. You want his initial reaction to the birds to be neutral or, that he even backs away.
    Do the same thing a week later, then a month later.
    DO NOT TEST HIM! DO NOT ASSUME HE IS TRAINED THE FIRST TIME!
    Set up and finish the whole program. When done, if he gets into the birds at a later date, you will have to determine how to react at that time.

  3. #3
    Member cristancanoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Seward
    Posts
    134

    Default

    We had great success training my labX to avoid rabbits. We worked with a trainer and used an ecollar method simular to the previous poster. It important for the dog to believe that the shock is coming from the rabbit, and that just looking at one could cause it.
    I know some folks don't agree with ecollar training, but for us it was important for safety since she would chase them no matter what was in the way (roads, trains, etc).

  4. #4
    Member Huntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Somewhere between here and there.....
    Posts
    1,173

    Default

    Agreed, Thats the only way we were able to live with 3 dogs (all with high prey drives) and about 100 chickens, turkeys and quail.

    It took a few months of hands on training, OB training and then we incorporated the ecollar at the end. With a healthy understanding of how to reinforce their good behavior with praise, we worked it out. Each dog only took once with the collar.

    Our dogs won't even look at them twice, however, our guard is never let down. At the end of the day, they are just dogs and doing what "dogs" do....
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    108

    Default

    I agree with the e-collar method as well. I have succesfully used it for avoidance training on three english setters and deer. Just make sure they always think the shock is coming from the critter and not you. I never spoke to my dogs when I trained them not to chase deer.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    WI now
    Posts
    4

    Default

    you have to remember too, that an e collar is only as good as the person that runs it though. Good advice here, just don't get too heavy or loose on the thumb.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •