Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33

Thread: Rain Shelters?

  1. #1
    Member Heg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    233

    Default Rain Shelters?

    When it is raining and I am on the river, I am not bothered by a good drenching. However, as soon as camp is made, the rain can be a major nuisance without a proper shelter. A week ago my wife and I spent 6 days on Lake Creek; it rained steadily the entire trip. During the day we were digging the incredible fishing and floating and were not deterred by the weather, but when it came to setting up the tarps, well that was a different story. This is not my first multi-day trip where it rained the entire time, but it is the first trip with my wife where it rained pretty much nonstop. When I am with the guys, we set up a quick shelter, drink beer, fish, gobble down some food, and go to sleep. When I am with my wife (and sometimes our kids), it is board games, gourmet meals, lounging around, talking…. Basically she (they) want to be comfortable. Although I have been setting up tarps since I was a kid, I still do not feel as though I have perfected this art. I use trees if available, oars, stakes, and parachute cords to set up my tarps. The tarps usually look like nice, solid structures when I set them up; then the rain and wind turn them into Heg’s riverside ghetto by the morning.

    I went on a trip with a friend that brought the Black Diamond Megamid (I think that was the model) and it worked great, but was too small for the family/friends. Do any of you have experience with some of the larger shelters like the NRS Riverwing? Are they worth the money?

    I was wondering if some of you that are traveling with big groups and/or kids, where comfort is critical, have any ideas you would be willing to share.

    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default

    It is hard to beat the stability and cost of a straight forward oar Teepee. You can make a pretty big one if you are using 9 to 10' oars. Just find the bigest heavey duty plastic tarp you can at the hardware store, especially one that has re-inforced gromets. The other big key piece is some big heavy duty steel stakes that are plenty long to whack way into the ground so they won't pull out in a big storm. If it is real nasty you can pitch the ends of the Teepee low and add rocks/logs to keep the ends down, in additon to the stakes. If it is just real rainy, but not too windy, you can elevate the corners with addtional oars. There are other tricks like wrapping a rock into the tarp end if the gromets pull out, so you can wrap some line around to stake out.

    I use the Tarp Teepee a lot in very windy conditions and it can work well. I also have a Sierra Designs oragami 4 teepee-style tarp that also works good, but is not as big as the oar teepee.


    Quote Originally Posted by Heg View Post
    When it is raining and I am on the river, I am not bothered by a good drenching. However, as soon as camp is made, the rain can be a major nuisance without a proper shelter. A week ago my wife and I spent 6 days on Lake Creek; it rained steadily the entire trip. During the day we were digging the incredible fishing and floating and were not deterred by the weather, but when it came to setting up the tarps, well that was a different story. This is not my first multi-day trip where it rained the entire time, but it is the first trip with my wife where it rained pretty much nonstop. When I am with the guys, we set up a quick shelter, drink beer, fish, gobble down some food, and go to sleep. When I am with my wife (and sometimes our kids), it is board games, gourmet meals, lounging around, talking…. Basically she (they) want to be comfortable. Although I have been setting up tarps since I was a kid, I still do not feel as though I have perfected this art. I use trees if available, oars, stakes, and parachute cords to set up my tarps. The tarps usually look like nice, solid structures when I set them up; then the rain and wind turn them into Heg’s riverside ghetto by the morning.

    I went on a trip with a friend that brought the Black Diamond Megamid (I think that was the model) and it worked great, but was too small for the family/friends. Do any of you have experience with some of the larger shelters like the NRS Riverwing? Are they worth the money?

    I was wondering if some of you that are traveling with big groups and/or kids, where comfort is critical, have any ideas you would be willing to share.

    Thanks.

  3. #3

    Default

    One suggestion to a "blue tarpe" solution. Sometimes if you add a bungie onto one or two of your guy lines, it allows some "flex" in windy situations.

    It allows the tarp to move a bit with the gusts, without bringng the whole house down.

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    2,008

    Default

    Heg,

    I carry a 12 x 20 tarp (or whatever size you need)

    I look for a spot between two trees at least 30' apart. I use parachute cord to tie off opposing corners as high up as I can reach. Then I set a center pole. From there I tie off the two loose corners to logs or rocks. Snug but not too tight.

    This makes a diamond shaped rain fly. The water doesn't pool and it's big enough to pitch a tent under with room for a few camp chairs.

    If I'm on a river with long flood-plain sections where trees are few I cut a few poles at the first opportunity and lash them to the boat so I know I'll have them.

  5. #5
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default Rain Shelters

    Heg,

    I have been using a Moss Outfitter Wing for years and have been very satisfied with it. It covers a huge area; plenty big enough for the kitchen and a sitting area. It goes with me on all my guided river trips.

    You would do well to supplement this with additional stakes (I use large spike nails about 10-12" long on some gravel bars, on others I use the larger metal tent pegs), lots of parachute cord (2-300'), and collapsable tent poles (you can find them at WalMart). The poles allow you to raise or lower the edges of the shelter to decrease wind resistance or increase visibility. When you leave camp, if you are concerned about wind issues while you are away, all you do is remove the poles and snug up all the lines. Everything under it stays dry that way.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  6. #6

    Default rain shelter

    i use a nrs riverwing. although it seemed a bit spendy off the bat, it has proved its worth. i like that it packs down smaller and lighter than a comparable sized plastic sheet/tarp, as well as being quieter once erected. the first time we set it up in real weather (famous copper river winds) it took a little trial and error to get the geometry of the stake-out pattern correct while dealing with the wind trying to peel the thing up. after we got the system dialed in it proved a valuable and much used shelter. cheers

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,449

    Default

    I use Kelty Noah's Tarps. I have the 12x12' and a 16x16' models, and use oars for the end poles. They're a lot less costly than NRS, MSR or Moss versions, but setup is similar, and they seem to work as well in the wind & rain. I have used an NRS tarp, but didn't see any advantage to it except that it came with poles. I have also pitched the 12x12' with a pole (oar) on only one corner, and the other three corners at ground level. This make a nice 1-2 person shelter for camping light. Check them out here: http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=kelty+noah%27s+tarp&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=3029915991&ref=pd_sl_2ri4493p3 l_b

  8. #8
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Get a wing...

    We use the MSR Parawing (discontinued) on our float trips. The worse the weather, the more valuble this thing is. Newer models out now like the Outfitter, and some smaller offerings. Perfect for keeping you dry and well worth the weight if you ask me. One suggestion, order some extra stakes as they can break. If room allows, some longer steel stakes would be the ticket. They need good grounding if the wind is blowing. Like a big sail if they are not kept taught. But good stakes/grounding takes care of this. Notice I have my 16.5' Ally canoe tending one corner in the pic below. We had a stake break. Live and learn

    Info below...

    Our Parawing...



    New models...

    Outfitter Wing...
    http://cascadedesigns.com/MSR/Tents/...erWing/product

    Vista Wing....
    http://cascadedesigns.com/MSR/Tents/...taWing/product

    For comparison, our Parawing is 180 square feet (of coverage) and is perfect for 4-6 people. These above models are on shoulder ends of my wing size wise. If four people or less, the Vista looks perfect. For 6 or more, look at the Outfitter. www.campmor.com has the Outfitter for $279.





    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  9. #9
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I think Alaska_Lanche may have put together the perfect solution for you. Check out the Golite Shangrila 8+ get it w/ a shangrila 4 "nest" and you will have an uber flexible setup. He has also ordered a packable stove for it and is having AK tent and tarp sew in a stove jack. The whole tent weight in at 10lbs pounds or so and is very packable. Check his post "10lb wall tent" in the outdoors gear section. Here is the tent http://www.golite.com/Product/prodde...x?p=SH6134&s=1

  10. #10

    Default several diferent shelter photos

    Here is a bunch,
    Walrus Fly
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11

    Default More Walrus fly

    Walrus Fly alone

    and Walrus fly pitched in combo with oar teepee tarp
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12

    Default Origami 4, Teepee Tarp, NRS fly

    Oar Tarp Teepee, Sierra Designs Origami 4, and NRS river tarp
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13

    Default Oar Teepee Tarp and Origami 4

    a couple more shots, small oar tripod teepee pitched low, and Sierra Designs Origami 4, these shelters were up in 50+ mph winds that night

    Sorry about all the posts, couldn't figure out how to put more than 2 attachements on one post? Also I have used the Moss large Parawing back in the 1990s over a 5 year period getting probably 100 nights in the field for work. I liked it the best. The second best for wind is the Oar Teepee pitched low. All of the others have also worked really well below. Note that you can pitch one of the NRS, Moss, or Walrus tarps off the end of the oar tripod teepee
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #14
    Member Heg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    233

    Default

    No worries shapp, I still cannot figure out how to post pictures at all.

    Thanks for all the posts guys. Maybe it will keep raining into the weekend and I can try a couple configurations out. I definitely need more and longer stakes for my guy lines. My wife and I have a great relationship and the only two things we argue about are me taking off for the good majority of the winter/spring to ski and setting up the tarp. Thanks for contributing to our relationship.

  15. #15
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    You said a mouthful man. My wife is supportive enough to go on these float trips each year. My job, and my job alone, is to keep her well fed, warm, and dry. A small price to pay

    She shows gratitude for my labors by catching the biggest fish

    Go figure?


    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Screen House vs. Noah's Tarp

    Our trip is on the Alagnak Aug 23rd and I'm wavering between REi's screen house with water proof fly http://www.rei.com/product/681226 or Kelty's Noah tarp http://www.rei.com/product/627835

    Obviously price is a big difference but there are 2 of us and only are able to have 140 lbs total, so is 20 lbs to much to waste? How bad will the bugs really be the last week of August?

  17. #17
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Welcome to the forum man


    The Kelty tarp would do well for four people I suspect at 144 square feet. Our MSR Parawing is 180 (or so) square feet and would be ok for 4-6 people. Keep in mind that rain doesn't always fall straight down. A storm blows in, you might not fit as many folks under that 12 x 12 Kelty as you first think. As for the bug house, hell no. I would just take a few bottles of Bens if you are worried about the bugs. If anything, depending on the size of your group, I would consider a larger wing. Also remember that the Kelty does not come with poles. The MSR models do, so factor that into the cost/weight. You might also check some other websites like Campmor. I like REI fine, but they are not the cheapest in my experience. Food for thought at any rate.

    We will be expecting a trip report when you get back (with pictures if possible). I am sure you guys will have a great trip.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  18. #18
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Onelastcast View Post

    Obviously price is a big difference but there are 2 of us

    Sorry man, missed this earlier. For two people, I would get the MSR Vista Wing for sure. Weighs 3.5 lbs and comes with poles. With all the weight you saved, take an extra 12 pack of beer

    http://cascadedesigns.com/MSR/Tents/...taWing/product
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  19. #19
    Member ducks n' dogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Kodiak, AK
    Posts
    70

    Default Stand alone rain fly......

    I have a wall tent (reliable tent and tipi Yellowstone - 15"x12") and I'm planning on using only the rain fly by itself as a cook/rain shelter. Anyone ever try this set up or one similar?



    May also try to pitch a small 2 man inside as well, similar to Alaska_lanche's new set up. That's a sweet rig wish I had thought of that......

  20. #20
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,767

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Onelastcast View Post
    ...How bad will the bugs really be the last week of August?
    Eh.... um.... well...

    (photo downloaded from net)

    It's anybody's guess, but I for one would never plan on there being no bugs...

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •