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Thread: Trekking poles, 2 vs. 1

  1. #1
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Trekking poles, 2 vs. 1

    Well, I decided to go with two trekking poles this year instead of one, gonna find out how it works, it worked great however when I worked out in the off season, and seems to me more stabililty with 2 with a heavy load, going downhill also. We'll see how it pans out. I did get the collaspsable "Black Diamond carbons" they fold up small (3 section) and are super light w/ cork handles.

  2. #2
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    As light wieght as they make them these days I can't see any reason not to take 2. As you said the stability with heavy loads would make it a god send. I would think 2 poles would darn near be a must for the Haul Rd. bunch as well as for any mountain hunts.

    Brett

  3. #3
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    Default 2 are great

    Used two every time I have been in the mountains since I have been hunting up here. Last year they saved my knees, packing a heavy pack down very steep slopes.
    I absolutely believe in the energy savings they provide going up and the stability they provide at all times.

  4. #4
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Yep I am in the 2 pole bunch as well! I didn't get the fancy carbon ones but my BD contour elliptical poles are great in their own right and I am so heavy to begin with they feel a bir more sturdy to me. I know my cousin was grateful that I carry two as he carries none. I felt so bad for him trying to carry his bear down through the slick alpine vegetation that loaned him one of mine. We both made it down injury free but I missed my other pole the whole way! When we got to the bottom I warned him that next time he better have some of his own even if they are just cheap ski poles from goodwill!
    Last edited by LuJon; 08-02-2009 at 16:27.

  5. #5
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    A couple of years back I only used a single chasing sheep and goats and loved it. When my knees started giving me trouble I went with two poles. Now, I wish I had gone with two years earlier. I have tried a few different types and personally have found the anti shock poles pretty worthless. I currently use the Black Diamond Contour Elliptical Trekking Poles and absolutley love everything about them. I have had to replace a lower 1/3 section of one that I fell on and BD was great in the replacement. I have 100s of miles on these poles, the flick lock system is the best IMHO, and the bent handles really add comfort.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  6. #6
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Two! Lost one in a stream up on the glacier last year and felt so awkward with just one. Luckily we found it when we came back down. It had been swept down and lodged in 2 boulders a mile down. The large baskets on the old ones really catch the current and are gone in no time!!

  7. #7
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I never used just one but love having two of them and you will love the carbon fiber black diamonds they are the cats meow between the light weight, reliable flick locks, and the carbon fiber acts as a shock absorber by not transmitting the shock like a aluminum pole does.

  8. #8

    Default Decided

    on giving them a try after hearing Mod elan talk about them. Bought a set at REI (yuck) and will give them a try this year. At the worst, I won't like them!

  9. #9

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    I guess I am in the minority here. I only use one trekking pole. My wife and I share a set basically. I find they get in the way when beating the brush even uphill with a heavy pack they are more trouble than they are worth in the brush. Besides while in the brush I just hang onto the alders (look at what you grab and make sure not devils club )

    But once I break out of the brushline I unstrap them from my pack and we each use one while uphill. On flat or moderate hiking I don't use one as I only use it for the 3 points of contact on the hills. I don't see much value in 2 myself as I just switch the pole to the hand that needs that point of contact the most. I tried two before, but on the hills and climbing in the rocks I still like having that other hand free so I can pull myself up by grabbing onto the rocks.

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    Member Browningguy9's Avatar
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    Default single

    dont worry Alaska_Lanche, i too also only use one. you pretty much took the words out of my mouth or well fingers with your post!

  11. #11
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    Up in the scree I prefer two. Particularly for coming down. In brush? If there's brush, trees, or grassy ground cover I won't take poles.

  12. #12

    Default caution using wrist straps

    IMHO be careful when going downhill if you have your using the wriststraps. I was downhilling from a hike and the pole got stuck in the mud and and I managed to slip at the same time. I came close to sliding downhill with my wrist in the strap and the pole in mud above me. It would have been very easy to dislocate a shoulder or worse if that were to happen under a heavy load.

    Just my .2 cents, be careful..... I know the straps are nice so you do not drop a pole and have it go bouncing down the hill.......and you chasing it.

    Brian

  13. #13
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I like two. A few years ago on a sheep hunt, my parter didn't have any. He was making fun of me before we got to the field. He was calling them "gay sticks". We had only been hiking about 1/2 a mile when he asked to try one out. I didn't get it back until the hunt was over 8 days later. The day he got back he bought two sets for him and his 70 year old dad for a fly out brooks range caribou hunt.

    I know he appreciated having one for that hunt, especially on the river crossings.

    What I really noticed was how much more I like having two than just one as I did on that hunt.

  14. #14
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    I guess I am in the minority here. I only use one trekking pole. My wife and I share a set basically. I find they get in the way when beating the brush even uphill with a heavy pack they are more trouble than they are worth in the brush. Besides while in the brush I just hang onto the alders (look at what you grab and make sure not devils club )

    But once I break out of the brushline I unstrap them from my pack and we each use one while uphill. On flat or moderate hiking I don't use one as I only use it for the 3 points of contact on the hills. I don't see much value in 2 myself as I just switch the pole to the hand that needs that point of contact the most. I tried two before, but on the hills and climbing in the rocks I still like having that other hand free so I can pull myself up by grabbing onto the rocks.

    Wow I didn't know that about you, I am not sure I can be seen in the field with a one pole hunter...





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    I'm a one poler myself and use mostly like a cane... I mean ice axe

  16. #16
    Member wolfkiller's Avatar
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    Default I use 2

    It helps the knees and my tent uses 2 trecking poles to pitch.
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  17. #17
    Member JboeslAK's Avatar
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    I have tried both two and one. I like two better, but when in brush they are a challange.

  18. #18
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    I'm a 2 poler but I don't use them below treeline. They're pretty much reserved for sidehilling and coming down.

    Since AlaskaLanche brought it up...A couple of thoughts on alder bands

    Consider carrying a cheap smaller bow saw for the pack in and when you get to the alders drop your pack and cut yourself a path. Yes, it will cost you 30 minutes to an hour but you now you don't have to fight them and you have a clear, safe route for the return when you'll be under an extra heavy load (hopefully).

    Oh, and bring a bit of flagging tape so you don't miss your spot and emerge from the alders at the top of a 100 ft cliff, forcing you to sidehill through 100 yards of more alders over the next 3 hours or so, and nearly falling to your death a couple of times...ahem.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik in AK View Post
    I'm a 2 poler but I don't use them below treeline. They're pretty much reserved for sidehilling and coming down.

    Since AlaskaLanche brought it up...A couple of thoughts on alder bands

    Consider carrying a cheap smaller bow saw for the pack in and when you get to the alders drop your pack and cut yourself a path. Yes, it will cost you 30 minutes to an hour but you now you don't have to fight them and you have a clear, safe route for the return when you'll be under an extra heavy load (hopefully).

    Oh, and bring a bit of flagging tape so you don't miss your spot and emerge from the alders at the top of a 100 ft cliff, forcing you to sidehill through 100 yards of more alders over the next 3 hours or so, and nearly falling to your death a couple of times...ahem.
    Hmm. Sounds like that could work at times. However, often its teh 3 ft tall drawf birch that goes on for miles and miles that often makes trekking poles more trouble than they are worth. So I'm not gonna stop and cut a path just so I can use my trekking poles.

    Yes it can be handy to cut a path at times, but how can you say it will only take an 1/2 to an hour when you have no idea where I am hiking and the amount and thickness of the alders I am hiking in. I see the validlity in it at times, but most of the time I'd rather plow my way through the alders and use them as my hand holds than a trekking pole. Besides you don't have to worry about self arresting when falling down hill in alders, trust me they won't let ya get to the bottom.

  20. #20
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Use for trekking poles

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