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Thread: Binos & Spotter or just Binos...Confused? (goat hunting)

  1. #1
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default Binos & Spotter or just Binos...Confused? (goat hunting)

    So I was talking with ADFG today and was shocked to hear them suggest that binoculars are all that are necessary for hunting goats...there is no need to take a spotting scope! I found this very interesting. I was always of the notion to spot with binos and then classify sex, legality, etc. with spotter.

    Thoughts?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Well, legality isn't an issue with goats - other than no nannies with kids - but due to the increased importance of harvesting billies, using a spotting scope could be quite helpful in accurately sexing the goat. I'll be taking both on my wife's goat hunt. It's not a lot of extra weight for quite a bit of benefit.

    Side note - have you taken the ADF&G goat sex ID quiz stickied at the top of this forum?

  3. #3

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    I'm going to help my dad hunt is goat permit on the 15th. Everyone going will be taking binos (4 of us) and one spotting scope and tripod to share between us. On the Kenai if you shoot a nanny you can't hunt goats on the Kenai for another 5 years. So a spotting scope may be handy in seeing if the animal is a billy or nanny at a mile a away if its worth the hike over there or not. Plus I just really enjoy glassing and looking for animals so I will not be caught without binos either. I realize that between my binos, tripod, and spotter thats 7 pounds in just optics, but you can't shoot what ya can't see.

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    For pretty much any hunting in Alaska you need a good set of 8x30 binoculars and a good 30-40x spotting scope. I would rather hunt with a $1000 pair of binos and a $300 rifle than a $300 pair of binos and a $1000 rifle.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    I have always taken a spotting and binocs on goat hunts and to date have not found a sufficiently good reason not to continue to do the same.

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    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Good Binoc's

    Leave the spotting scope at home. They aren't like sheep, you can approach them as they assume you can't climb to their level. A good pair of binoculars is all you need in the field.
    BK

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Bring both

    I'm heading out tommorow for goat. I'm loaded up with a 12x40 bino and 20x50 spotter with tripod. I wouldn't go into the high country without it. I gain so much confidence and pleasure utilizing this combo it's invaluable to me when spending the time and energy to get the upper hand on mt. animals. Sometimes those Billies will hole up and you'll just be finding some hair or horns sticking above a snow bank or rocky outcropping. Utilize the optics to distiguish sex and just be a steward of the game. Being in the moutains among the goats is a honor and privelage take advantage of it utilize optics and enjoy the show.

    55 Ibs-75 Ibs it's still a b-itch getting in the alpine.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    At the range I have to shoot from I just use my reading glasses when extra vission is needed

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    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Sometimes those Billies will hole up
    In this heat you can bet on that .....

    Bighorse brought up a good point ... we sure use that spotter plenty trying to gleen Goats out of the brush from all those tiny white spots.

    Sometimes we have one spotting scope on a hunt ... sometimes we all have em with us.

  10. #10
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i'd almost take the spotter and leave the binos, a good spotter can save you ALOT of hiking and walking and goat for the most part, depending on where you are, aren't that hard to spot. scanning with a spotter is doable adn saves your neck some hastle...
    but if i had to chose one over the other, i'd take the spotter and not the binos.
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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    I'm heading out tommorow for goat. I'm loaded up with a 12x40 bino and 20x50 spotter with tripod. I wouldn't go into the high country without it. I gain so much confidence and pleasure utilizing this combo it's invaluable to me when spending the time and energy to get the upper hand on mt. animals. Sometimes those Billies will hole up and you'll just be finding some hair or horns sticking above a snow bank or rocky outcropping. Utilize the optics to distiguish sex and just be a steward of the game. Being in the moutains among the goats is a honor and privelage take advantage of it utilize optics and enjoy the show.

    55 Ibs-75 Ibs it's still a b-itch getting in the alpine.
    Wow, Horse...pretty early for goat. Donno if you'll glass any hair in the brush with those early bald billies. <grin>
    Hold out awhile for the thick hairy goats!

  12. #12
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Fat and happy

    Early.....this is a trip I savor dearly for the succulent meat. In fact it's actually not one for myself other than the BBQ afterwards. My wife is the shooter on this one.

    August produces the fattest and most delicious Mt. Goat meat and I speak from experience.

    Your right the hair is very, very short but does produce an excellent garmet quality hide with virtually no gaurd hairs and just a thin layer of the soft wool.

    I'm really not in it for the trophy. In fact considering the intense elevation we'll have to gain and loose.....I'd like a 3yr old billy to carry out. Well see though. I'll post some photos in late August after my sheep hunt. The third week of Sept. is my go-round. The hides are better then.

    So I'll be lugging a spotter, binos, and camera.

  13. #13
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Early.....this is a trip I savor dearly for the succulent meat. In fact it's actually not one for myself other than the BBQ afterwards. My wife is the shooter on this one.

    August produces the fattest and most delicious Mt. Goat meat and I speak from experience.

    Your right the hair is very, very short but does produce an excellent garmet quality hide with virtually no gaurd hairs and just a thin layer of the soft wool.

    I'm really not in it for the trophy. In fact considering the intense elevation we'll have to gain and loose.....I'd like a 3yr old billy to carry out. Well see though. I'll post some photos in late August after my sheep hunt. The third week of Sept. is my go-round. The hides are better then.

    So I'll be lugging a spotter, binos, and camera.
    Best of luck to the Mrs. and you, Horse.

    My wife is also to be the shooter for the goat, but she is waiting for the thick hair; ours will be an early October hunt. The meat will be sausaged.
    Goat isn't our favorite table fare compared with deer, elk and my bighorn tag....

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Thanks!

    Good points on all accounts. And, unless all of you said leave the spotter at home, it was going anyway. Scope and tripod total out at 4.1 pounds so not a killer even if it were part of the equation.

    Goat quiz...yup! Sure did! My partner and I sat down a long while ago and did well...I did a lot better after I put on a pair fo reading glasses Over my contacts Yup, pretty bad on the eyesight side of things...sure hope i don't have to use that excuse though

    Any other threads or places to do some last minute studying on deciphering sex?

    Thanks!

  15. #15

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    Have any of you used a small video camera? I know it isn't as good as a spoting scope but I took one on my moose hunt last year, We saw some sheep way up on the hill side and I took some video of them. Then I played it back and zoomed in on a couple of the rams. We picked out two that were possibly legal. To bad they weren't open in that area. my camera has 60X optical and 2000X zoom and is very light.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    i'd almost take the spotter and leave the binos, a good spotter can save you ALOT of hiking and walking and goat for the most part, depending on where you are, aren't that hard to spot. scanning with a spotter is doable adn saves your neck some hastle...
    but if i had to chose one over the other, i'd take the spotter and not the binos.
    This is exactly correct. You need to be able to determine that it is a Billy, with horns as long as his face, BEFORE you make the stalk/climb to kill him. Otherwise you will be chasing the wrong quarry and wasting your time and energy.

    Take the good spotting scope and leave the binoculars at home.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  17. #17
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Just a thought...

    Since you can't eat the horns and you are looking for a meat goat, does it really matter to you if it's a billy or ewe?
    BK

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    well if you shoot an ewe your in deep poopy...but if you shoot a nanny your ok. some areas have restrictions with what you can shoot now and taking billies helps the goat population in the long run and helps with keeping herds more healthy. its nice to think of the next years hunters when your on a mtn rather than just yourself. there are times when a nanny is the best you can do and don't feel to bad about it..but for the overall good, a billy is best.
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    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Also it's been my experience that a Nanny is much better table fare than a Bill .... when Ketchikan hunters use to meat hunt Goat ... Nannies were preferred.

    I say 'use to' because charter air fare has gone up so that not much Goat hunting goes on around here any more.

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