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Thread: Drolet Adirondack

  1. #1

    Default Drolet Adirondack

    Okay, I bought a Drolet Adirondack woodstove for our still-in-progress 24X36 frame cabin up Willow way. We ran a few small fires through it to break it in, cure the paint. But two days ago we built a real fire in it. Problem was, it would hardly damp down, even with the air control rod pushed all the way in. It never got too hot, but I don't see how it will damp down for a nice night load of wood. It has a fairly small firebox. There is no call for a flue damper, but I am considering installing one. I don't know if this is due to the construction of the stove and is intentional to prevent too much creosote build-up from a quiet fire or what. Anybody have any experience with this, any thoughts on a flue damper which seems like a quick solution to the unhindered air flow. Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default

    Two thoughts.

    1) A flue damper may void your fire insurance. It does mine.

    2) Call Rural Energy Enterprises in Anchorage and discuss your problems. They're the Drolet distributor and usually have good technical service.

  3. #3
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Better check

    If the Adirondack is not dampering down it might be an internal problem. Mine dampers down enough to almost shut the fire down. I do have a damper up above though just in case. Make sure that when you clean the stack though that you vacuum in the stove around the top. Some times the creosote falls down and will shut the stove down in that area. Other than than it is a good stove. Won't hold the entire night on spruce and cotton wood but otherwise mine is fine.

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  4. #4

    Default Called REE

    They told me that the new Adirondack is an EPA regulated stove and it will, from the factory, only dampen down about 25-30% to keep particulate count down. Looks like a properly adjusted flue damper is the only way to control the burn. I like the stove overall though. I've never had a woodstove without a flue damper. Ah, progress....

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    They told me that the new Adirondack is an EPA regulated stove and it will, from the factory, only dampen down about 25-30% to keep particulate count down. Looks like a properly adjusted flue damper is the only way to control the burn. I like the stove overall though. I've never had a woodstove without a flue damper. Ah, progress....
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  6. #6
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    Default

    the new Adirondack is an EPA regulated stove and it will, from the factory, only dampen down about 25-30%
    Perhaps, with some field "adjusting", the factory limits can be revised?

  7. #7

    Default field adjustments

    Before putting in the flue damper, which still seems a viable solution, I will snuggle down and look at the air flow mechanism. Perhaps I can "tinker" with it. Either way, it will be corrected. How many years have well-maintained stoves with flue dampers served us. Far longer then I've been on this earth and I'm far rom a spring chicken.

  8. #8

    Default small discovery

    Checked under the stove body and the air control is very easy to see. simply rod and sliding plate, which is cut out to leave a small open "slot" when in the fully closed position. I can either fill in the slot or make a new plate that does not have the slot and adjust as necessary. I have the feeling that there is an air "leak" somewhere, because the little slot in the plate doesn't seem big enough to let the stove keep burning like it does, but we shall see. Thanks for all your help.

  9. #9

    Default

    I have a Drolet Adirondack, too, and after having used an air-tight stove (homemade but built along the lines of a Fire King, I think) for years, I am disappointed in the Drolet. But someone later told me, well, what do you expect, it's not an air-tight stove.

    It does a good job, but I sure don't like having to feed it every three hours through the night in the winter. Next wood stove I get will be an air-tight stove.

  10. #10

    Default You must mean

    by design, not actual construction right? It is supposed to be an airtight stove, so there must be a flaw beside the air control sliding plate.

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