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Thread: how much fuel?

  1. #1
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default how much fuel?

    Jet boil stove, planning for 10 day sheep hunt with 2 hunters. Looking for recommendation on how much fuel to take.

    Flying in on the 9th, can't friggen wait.
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  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    3 canisters should do it. They're not heavy, though, so maybe an extra wouldn't hurt. If you'll be near some trees big enough to make a fire with, though, you could just go with three and rely on wood for emergency backup.

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    Default Size matters

    [QUOTE=Brian M;542215]3 canisters should do it. They're not heavy,QUOTE]


    Depends on what size you have. I'm taking 2 med sized cans of fuel for myself for 10 days. Not sure how much wood you'll have where you are going; some early scouting may help with that.

    If I run out, I'll be eating cold mtn house.....yummy.

  4. #4

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    My wife and I use take a small 100g canister and a 250g canister on a week to 10 day long hunts, but we make tea and coffee throughout the day and usage is more than most I would imagine. The reason for the 2 different size canisters instead of 3 small is that less bulk and less weight and a little more fuel as two empty small canisters weigh more than one 250g canister. The 100g goes inside the JB on our day hikes away from camp to have to make tea and what not when its cold and raining it really brightens the day. The large canister we use in camp to boil all the water for the mountain house meals and oatmeal in the mornings. Seems the large canister for basecamp and the small one to fit inside the stove for day trips away from camp seems to be the best combo for us. Something to look into anyways.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Good thinking, Lanche. Tell you what, I'll give that a shot and make you a cup of coffee while you're butchering my caribou.

  6. #6
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Error on the side of caution...

    One thing to consider, wind and temps will cut down on effeciency. I would take a little extra fuel if I were you. Perhaps log wind/temps/usage in a journal on this trip and next time you will have a basis for comparison. One thing is for sure, fuel is not the place to save weight if you are unsure on how much to take.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Me and a buddy used 1 can for 4 full days last year. Had to switch out on the 5th day. However, he didn't use it three times a day like I did. I think 3 cans should do it, but a fourth might be good insurance. I second the idea that fuel is one area to NOT cut weight. It beats eating cold, partially hydrated Mtn Houses or Clif bars for the last few days of a hunt.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Good thinking, Lanche. Tell you what, I'll give that a shot and make you a cup of coffee while you're butchering my caribou.
    Oh yes sounds good. But thats if and only if you have a cup of coffee sitting ready for me when I make it up to you and your wife to help haul out her giant caribou.

    I agree with Dan though, if you don't have enough experience to err on the side of caution on how much YOU use in given conditions then it'd be best to throw an extra 100g. Just speaking from what I have found for my wife and I during longer backpacking trips in the summer/fall. If you are able to boil water inside the vestibule of you tent on windy days or behind a big rock outcropping or something to protect the stove from the wind you fuel will last quite a bit longer and your boil times will be faster.

    Another thing to consider is if you filter your water already for MH meals you do not actually need to bring it to a rolling boil!!! Just get it as hot as you need. Often times the food is ready before its cool enough to eat due to putting boiling water needlessly in my MH baggy. Two things wrong with this. 1) You waste extra fuel for you stove getting it hotter than it needs to be. 2) And much more importantly I have to try to be patient and wait while my food cools while I am starving after hiking all day or risk burning my mouth. Just something to consider.

    If I am camped by a creek then I will just fill up my JB direclty out of the creek and boil it. But if I am camped on a ridge all the water in my camelback is already filtered so why boil it?

  9. #9
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    My wife and I use take a small 100g canister and a 250g canister on a week to 10 day long hunts, but we make tea and coffee throughout the day and usage is more than most I would imagine. The reason for the 2 different size canisters instead of 3 small is that less bulk and less weight and a little more fuel as two empty small canisters weigh more than one 250g canister. The 100g goes inside the JB on our day hikes away from camp to have to make tea and what not when its cold and raining it really brightens the day. The large canister we use in camp to boil all the water for the mountain house meals and oatmeal in the mornings. Seems the large canister for basecamp and the small one to fit inside the stove for day trips away from camp seems to be the best combo for us. Something to look into anyways.
    I like this idea as well.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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