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Thread: Kenai reds close to shore?

  1. #1
    Member trochilids's Avatar
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    Default Kenai reds close to shore?

    Folks often mention that reds in the Russian River vicinity of the Kenai are often close to shore, and people standing knee deep in the river might be fishing too far out.

    Well, I spent a couple hours on the Kenai below the ferry Saturday night with relatives and my kids who'd never flipped for reds before. We found a wide open spot a short hike downriver and I started to show them the method. I only had a couple feet of line out, and a very light weight and was just demonstrating the flip method with my toes in the water. At the end of my second demonstration drift I was saying, "and at the end of the drift you might feel a tug as you start to pull your line in, LIKE THIS." Fish on! Landed my first and only red of the night. It was probably little more than only a rods distance from shore...

    Worth a bunch of laughs, too!

    What's even more funny is that I still suck as a red fisher; I only got one more hookup the rest of the evening, while other folks nearby had much better success... Guess the ticket is to not really try? Or maybe I was just cashing in good karma for showing newbies how to do it...
    Palmer, Alaska
    "There are some things money can buy. For everything else, there's ALASKA!"

  2. #2

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    I don't have it down to an exact science but I think this is how it goes. reds do travel close to shore but more travel closer to the deeper waters freom my experience. I keep an eye out to where my neighbors are casting and usually the farthest one out who knows how to reach the bottom has the most success.

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    As a professional fish counter I can tell you reds travel very close to shore 95% of the time, typically where the current starts picking up speed
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4

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    It just boggles me to see people wading waist deep in the Cottonwood Hole at the Russian. I like seeing there faces when I hook fish right behind them when I pass by there.... that hole has become a zoo!

  5. #5
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I should say that in large rivers sockeye travel close to shore, in small rivers with pocket water such as the russian they tend to hold in pools throughout the river, also when they are hanging out ready to spawn they mill around in pools but on the lower kenai its a good bet any sockeye are in sloughs or within 10 feet from shore. Also I've noticed that hooking a sockeye makes others switch to the other bank for a while (this on the Alagnak which is of similar size to the kenai although much clearer) so the best advice I can give is fish on the bank with less people even if it doesn't look like as good of water, there will probably be more fish passing.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    As a professional fish counter I can tell you reds travel very close to shore 95% of the time, typically where the current starts picking up speed
    Want to trade jobs?
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