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Thread: Why you don't want to get stuck below high tide line

  1. #1

    Default Why you don't want to get stuck below high tide line

    Was dipping on the Kasilof this weekend. Started at high tide. As tide went out, this slowly appeared. Story was that the guy was trying to retrieve a boat. Track hoe pulled him out at low tide.
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  2. #2

    Default ooooooo!

    Judging from the angle of that shot towards the channel, that truck is in the muck or in the saturated marbles just above it.

    It's really rough learning the hard way.

    Good photo. Should be included in the chapter "What Not to do While Dipnetting"

  3. #3

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    Definately a ways out into the muck and nowhere near the gravel. If he'd asked for help (track hoe) from the processer next door as soon as he got stuck he might have been able to save his truck.

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Saw that coming. Way too many people taking chances by parking down on the beach. Slow learning curve I guess.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  5. #5
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    You guys remember Deep Creek from before the storm..guys would cross the launching slough at low tide and get stuck. Many times Ive seen pop marks on the hood at high tide lol.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  6. #6
    Member russiarulez's Avatar
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    Kasilof - 2007 dipnetting season. Car remained there for over two weeks I think...
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  7. #7

    Default Ah yes

    The AMC Eagle. They tried for awhile, then left it. It was way down the north shore halfway to the setnetters.

  8. #8
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    Default Funny stuff

    The Cash for Clunkers program comes to mind. Never mind the damp seats, just had it cleaned.......

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Was dipping on the Kasilof this weekend. Started at high tide. As tide went out, this slowly appeared. Story was that the guy was trying to retrieve a boat. Track hoe pulled him out at low tide.
    I left before this happened. I heard about it the next day though while out dipping. The story I heard (and this is all hearsay) was that the driver was trying to retrieve a boat and was not the nicest person (is that a nice way to put it ) Therefore when he got stuck nobody was going to help him.

    AK Chappy

  10. #10
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    Actually, he was a nice person, but I, too, heard that he was not too nice when his truck first got stuck. I can see why.... it happened while the tide was starting to come back in, so I bet he was pretty desperate. It backfired on him though, since people are not going to help if you are not polite in asking....

    I spoke with him for about ten minutes after the track rig finished towing him up to the dunes. He said he had "gone out there many times before." Well, I somehow doubt he was out in that muck before. Shame, really.

    Boy, the fishing was slow that day (and the next).

  11. #11
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    Default sunken rigs.

    Hah! That picture reminds me of a trick a friend's kid pulled in Willapa Bay in Washington about 15 years ago.

    A friend was out 4-wheeling at low tide on the mudflats (illegal) and got stuck so he called another friend to come pull him out. The second rig got stuck so they called my friend's kid and he came to rescue the other two and also got stuck. Soon after the tide came in and got all three vehicles. They were afraid to call authorities for help due to the illegal nature of the act. Next day at low tide, one of the fathers who logged and had a hydraulic cable spool got them out. Another lesson learned.

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