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Thread: Best way to cure sockey eggs?

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    Default Best way to cure sockey eggs?

    What are some techniques to cure some eggs??!?!

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    i cure mine usually with plain ol salt and let em dry on some cardboard, flip em and salt em again till they have a good consistency, like moist, but tough. you can cut em into the right size chunks, put the chunks in a can with your "mix" or whatever, and gently roll and shake em up till well coated then let em dry again. if you wanna take time to make some " candy eggs" , use brown sugar or borax mixed with the salt. some guys use wd-40 to give em more scent. keep your cured eggs in a good airtight, dark container.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I just use the commercial products myself. I just mix in some of the additives to each batch to make them a little different(Monster bite, Slam-o-la,Etc.)
    You might want to buy Scott Haugens book on egg cures. Lots of good reciepies from home brews to how to spice up the commercial products.
    CHRIS

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    This is a favorite topic of mine, and I am very particular about it. While many may disagree, the way you cure your bait is directly related to how many fish you will catch. I went to a class at the Sportsman’s show about 15 years ago on egg curing and Greg Brush actually said "I am not a better fishermen, I have better bait". I did not believe him until I tried out his method. I caught way more fish than I had before and caught fish when no one else was. .

    First a word about scent, you don't want your eggs to smell like anything but eggs. So carry rubber gloves with you and use new equipment. I have a dedicated set of equipment for egg curing. Buckets, scissors, drying racks, jars all should be new. Be sure to wash your hands very good and try not to touch the eggs with anything other than rubber gloves.

    So here we go, how to cure eggs:

    First things first, Make sure to bleed the donor fish right away and pull the eggs out and get them on ice till you can cure them (its best to wear rubber glove while removing the eggs to prevent scent contamination)
    Next go get a new bucket (large glass jars work better, but I always end up breaking them), a new pair of scissors and some rubber gloves.
    Put on the rubber gloves and cut the eggs into the sized pieces you want. Don't let the eggs drop more than about 2-3 inches. I usually lay the bucket on its side and cut the eggs in the bucket. Don't put too many eggs in the bucket, usually on good king skein or a couple small red skeins is about all that I do at one time in one bucket. You also need to try to cut the eggs across the skein so they will stay together. Small skeins are no problems but when curing king eggs it can be hard .
    Sprinkle your cure of choice on the eggs. I like Pro-glo, but have used pro-cure and about 10 others over the years. Pro-Glow has produced the best results for me. It’s hard to find, usually the place right by the Kenai river bridge in Soldotna has it (Dave’s I think it is) and sometimes Wal-Mart or Fred Meyer have it. Anyway make sure sprinkle it on lightly, and then rotate the bucket to turn the eggs over and let them get covered. I usually end up doing this about three time to get them all covered.
    Let them sit in a cool place in the shade. I have a refrigerator that I use but I have also just put them under my truck in August and that works. Just keep them out of the sun. Go by and turn them over every hour or so to prevent the top layer from drying out.
    Now the tricky part, you have to keep watching them to determine when they are ready to be dried out. If you watch them you should see them let out a ton of fluid, then over the next couple of hours they should absorb most of the fluid back into them. This is the point you will want to dry them. If you wait too long they will let all the fluid back out and will be terrible. Anyway, once they suck all the fluid back up (or most of it) you can set them out to dry. Do not use Newspaper for this or your eggs will smell like ink. I use a sweater drying rack that I got at Wal-Mart. It works well and is washable. I have also seen stainless steel mesh used, I have just never invested in that. What ever you use, you want the excess fluid to drain off the eggs. You don’t want them lying in a puddle while trying to dry. I guess dry is not the correct term either, I just let them drain for a couple of hours and them bag them up. They will be slightly sticky at this point. So drain/dry them until they reach the consistency you like and bag them up. I use quart size freezer zip locks, and suck all the air out before I put in the freezer or refrigerator. At the end of the season I will dry some out a bit more and vac pack for the spring kings.

  5. #5

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    JR2, thanks for that information. You seem to be a stickler on keeping scent off your eggs when curing. How do you handle eggs when fishing? Do you wear rubber gloves when baiting up?

    Eel

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    Member JR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EelRiverChrome View Post
    JR2, thanks for that information. You seem to be a stickler on keeping scent off your eggs when curing. How do you handle eggs when fishing? Do you wear rubber gloves when baiting up?

    Eel
    I tried wearing rubber gloves when baiting up but you go through so many pairs of them in a 4-5 hour day of fishing that its just not worth it. I just wash my hand really well and avoid getting any bug repellent or other foul smells on them. After baiting up a few times I think my hand would make good bait as they smell like fish eggs for about two days after I go fishing. If the fish are being particularly finicky I have use scent on my hands after washing them. I have anise oil and fish egg scent in bottles. Just put a bunch on your hands like lotion and rub it in.

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    Default not all rubber gloves are equal

    Quote Originally Posted by JR2 View Post
    I tried wearing rubber gloves when baiting up but you go through so many pairs of them in a 4-5 hour day of fishing that its just not worth it. I just wash my hand really well and avoid getting any bug repellent or other foul smells on them. After baiting up a few times I think my hand would make good bait as they smell like fish eggs for about two days after I go fishing. If the fish are being particularly finicky I have use scent on my hands after washing them. I have anise oil and fish egg scent in bottles. Just put a bunch on your hands like lotion and rub it in.



    JR2 is right on, and will add some thoughts that might be helpful.

    I've tried a few different kinds of gloves. Latex will work, but they are not durable at all and you will go through several pairs. A better solution is Nitrile. They are much more durable.

    If you are going to go to the trouble of wearing gloves to handle and cure your eggs, why ruin the smell by NOT wearing gloves when it's time to fish? Remember that according to the scientists, salmon are capable of detecting smells in the few parts per billion range.

    I am admidttedly lazy, and for fishing silvers up here I often violate this rule myself. However, when fishing the Kenai for kings where the bites are sometimes few I always where gloves. Be aware that gloves are not the end-all. If you contaminate your gloves by messing with your gas tanks, bug dope, etc. they won't help you. You're eggs will still smell bad.

    If you don't like gloves, there is something you can do. I fished with Clancy Holt, a very reputable Pacific NW guide for steelhead. When I fished with him, he did not wear gloves. But he insisted that anyone who was going to touch bait had to wash their hands in shrimp oil. He had us pour a puddle of shrimp oil into our palms, and then basically go through the motions of washing our hands with the shrimp oil. Smelly? Yep. Did the fish notice we didn't have gloves on? Nope. We caught several summer steelhead each that morning.

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    yeah i dont beileve in that i cure my eggs with my hands i even used some gloves my wife cleanes the sink with and i caught my limit at bird today with them so even a little bleach wont hurt

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