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Thread: Tire Sizes..

  1. #1
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    Default Tire Sizes..

    Hey folks,

    I'm looking at purchasing some new tires for our wheelers. One is a 2007 Big Bear 400 and the other is a 2008 Arctic Cat 400. The stock tire sizes for both are 25x8x12 Front and 25x10x12 Rear. I'd like to keep the stock wheels. Would 26x9x12 fit the front wheels? I'm looking at 26x10x12 for the Rear....or should I go with 26x12x12, and would those fit the stock wheels?

    I'm looking at the ITP SwampLites.

    Thanks for the help!

  2. #2

    Default Tire Size

    Martin14 -

    Yes I believe you can put the 26x9x12 on your stock rims and 26x10x12 on back, I would probably recommend going with the 26x11x12 on the back.

    You said you are looking at the ITP Swamplites. Do you mean Mudlites? I thought the Swamplites are made by Interco, not ITP. Personally, I like my Mudlites (I have 26x10s on the front and 26x12s on the back) but as we found out in Eureka a couple weeks ago, the Mudlites don't have the strongest sidewalls. After researching, I found A LOT of forums of people talking about the weak sidewalls on the Mudlites. I'm thinking about switching to the Maxxis Zilla tires (not the MudZilla). My next set would be dropping down to 26x9 on front and keeping the 26x12 on the back.

    The Interco Swamplites are 26lbs/ea front and 27lbs/ea back tires for the size you asked about. The Zilla tires are 19.3lbs/ea front and 23lbs/ea back.

    EagleRiverDee and I are going out tomorrow. You and the misses are welcome to come. Let me know.

  3. #3
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
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    I would stick with the 9" fronts and go 12" on the rear. You go to 10" or more on the fronts and the steering gets really tough. The 26" height works well on most all wheelers without giving up any bottom end. I am running 28's on one of my wheelers, a polaris 700 and it has enough hp to not really notice any loss. The rub alittle when I hit hard bumps goofing off, but I really love the extra slearance they give me. As for the tire you pick, if you run alot of cross country or really narly trails with alot of roots and sticks, I would go with 589's. The sidewalls are way tough on those and it is hard to run a stick through them. The mudlites have way softer and weaker sidewalls. They get sticks run through them pretty easily. The other advantage to the 589's or other heavy sidewall tire is that they can be run dead flat with zero air in them and you will not even know it! The sidewall is so stiff that it will keep the tire up. The down side is if you run alot of gravel roads or "nice" trails, they are a much harsher ride as the tire does not absord any of the small bumps as a soft tire would. It's all a trade off. I personally prefer to have an agressive tire that bites well and will not leave me with a flat. I will give up some cushy ride and the rare occasion that I am riding somewhere that I can notice the difference. The 589's will last you the life of your wheeler.

  4. #4

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    For a 400 size machine stay with the original size tire. If you go to 26 you will see a big power loss. I not only used to work for Arctic Cat but also ride the 400 size machine. With the bigger tire you would only gain 1/2" in clearance but lose a ton of power. Just my experience. We used to put the 26's on 650 or bigger machines however then we experienced twisted off half shafts. this was 3 yrs ago so maybe things have changed. I ride mudlite xtr's myself

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    Hey Keith! Yes, I was talking about the Interco Swamplites, I was looking at other tires while I was typing. Thanks for the weight info, I wasn't aware the SwampLites were that heavy.

    It looks like hotcity2 had some good reasons for sticking with the stock tire sizes. I did a quick search on the Maxxis Zilla, it looks like the only 25in sizes are 8x12 and 10x12. Think those would be worth the purchase?

    I appreciate the invite. I'm taking my brother and his buddy up to Petersville tomorrow. We're probably just going to stick to the road to the right of the Forks and hopefully stay out of the nasty stuff. I have to pick them up in Big Lake on my way up otherwise I might've taken you up on the offer.

  6. #6

    Default ATV Tires

    My fiance wants to keep 8" width front tires and I can only find those in 25" (25x8x12). I haven't been able to find any 26" tires that width. So, for her machine (Grizzly 700 EPS) I will likely keep stock size tires, just switch to some sort of mud tire. Her stock tread simply fills up with mud and doesn't release it, so they turn into slicks and she can't get through the same terrain that I can easily crawl through with my Mudlites. She likes the ITP 589's - good mud tire, very tough rubber (to resist punctures), but it won't be as smooth of a ride on hard pack. The other tire I'm thinking about is the Maxxis Zilla for her machine - looks like a good mud tread and more tread for a smoother ride. The Zilla's are lighter, but that shouldn't really be an issue with the size machine she's riding. I found lots of posts about the Mudlites getting sidewall punctures. The Zilla's are a slightly lighter tire so I'm worried about punctures on those, but I haven't seen any posts out there mentioning them negatively.

    The misses, my son, and I are heading up to Permanente Trail in the morning. We are going to get onto the Chickaloon Trail System from there and see where it goes. We've done Permanente a few times, this spring we found were it connects to the Chickaloon Trail but there was too much snow to get very far. Hopefully it will be a good adventure.

    Have fun in Petersville.

  7. #7
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    The bear is known for having a VERY low first gear. It will run the bigger tires no problem from what I was told by the dealer. I too would go w/ 9" in front and 12" in the rear for both wheelers. I have 10" mudlites on front of a Kodiak 400 and they are too wide in my opinion. My cousin runs 27" mudlites on his stock AC wheels (650h1) so I know they will fit your 400.

    As for the 8" wide griz tires I can't see a good reason not to go to 9" since the EPS will still make it pretty easy to steer despite the slight wider tire. I have ridden stock tires w/ friends who are running 26"ers on the same trail and the difference was significant.

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    LuJon,

    That is why I was contemplating the larger 26in tires on the Big Bear, the gearing does seem pretty low. I can definitely understand why not to run the larger tires on the Arctic Cat, it's either geared very high or its just weak.

    As for the comments from "Wanna Fish" made regarding the desire to stick with an 8in width...I believe this has something to do with a bridge crossing that is required to get back to his cabin. I think the wider tires get wedged.

    Just got back from Petersville. Had an absolute blast. Surprisingly, it didn't rain on us much at all. Road Petersville road back to the right of the Forks. Ended up taking a trail straight up the hillside a ways back, had a great view of the entire area. Came back down and went up the road a bit further and had fun criss crossing the creek back there. On our way in, we stopped at the turn off for McKinley View (or Kenney Creek cabins) whatever they're called these days. Made it about 100 yards in before getting swallowed by the swamp. We decided to stick to the road from there on.

    Anyway, thanks for everyones responses/advice.

  9. #9
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    @Martin14-

    You are correct. WannaFish's comment about my tires is due to our need to cross the pedestrian bridge at Talkeetna. I rub it right now with stock tires. He has to put his in 4-low and force his way through with his wider tires and the last time through it messed up his alignment with his handlebars.

    We're just trying to find a good compromise- tires that will help me to not get stuck so badly in mud and boggy ground yet will allow me to run a single set of tires and not have to change out for a cabin run.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theultrarider View Post
    I would stick with the 9" fronts and go 12" on the rear. You go to 10" or more on the fronts and the steering gets really tough. The 26" height works well on most all wheelers without giving up any bottom end. I am running 28's on one of my wheelers, a polaris 700 and it has enough hp to not really notice any loss. The rub alittle when I hit hard bumps goofing off, but I really love the extra slearance they give me. As for the tire you pick, if you run alot of cross country or really narly trails with alot of roots and sticks, I would go with 589's. The sidewalls are way tough on those and it is hard to run a stick through them. The mudlites have way softer and weaker sidewalls. They get sticks run through them pretty easily. The other advantage to the 589's or other heavy sidewall tire is that they can be run dead flat with zero air in them and you will not even know it! The sidewall is so stiff that it will keep the tire up. The down side is if you run alot of gravel roads or "nice" trails, they are a much harsher ride as the tire does not absord any of the small bumps as a soft tire would. It's all a trade off. I personally prefer to have an agressive tire that bites well and will not leave me with a flat. I will give up some cushy ride and the rare occasion that I am riding somewhere that I can notice the difference. The 589's will last you the life of your wheeler.
    not so sure about them lasting the life of a wheeler. I have used 589s on my king quad 700 and in 1600 miles i wore the back ones down to about .25 inches of tread. i am now running mudlite xtr which is a radial tire. i like them so far.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK375HH View Post
    not so sure about them lasting the life of a wheeler. I have used 589s on my king quad 700 and in 1600 miles i wore the back ones down to about .25 inches of tread. i am now running mudlite xtr which is a radial tire. i like them so far.

    I was refering more so to the sidewalls and the tire itself and not the tread. 1600 miles on an atv is very good. Especially if any of that was on gravel. The gravel roads eat them up very quickly.

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    So...is $480 reasonable for shipping 8 tires via UPS?

  13. #13

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    $480 to ship 8 tires sounds like a lot to me.

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    That's what I thought. I'm having a problem finding any cheaper alternatives.

  15. #15

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    I bought a full set of Mudlites from JC Whitney last year, I paid $298 for them shipped to my door. They went UPS ground which means, living in Alaska, it comes up by air. We had them in 3 days after ordering them.

    Edited to add: I just checked their pricing again, for 4 26x10x12 and 4 26x8x12 Mudlite shipped to Eagle River it cost $654.82, thats for the tires plus shipping and handling. If you go with a set of smaller tires for the Cat it will be even cheaper.

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    Thanks for the tip! I priced out some ITP 589s for both quads (they didn't appear to have the Maxxis Zilla) at around $800 including shipping. By far the best price I've found online.

  17. #17
    Member BAR300's Avatar
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    Default check Go Pro

    In Anchorage, I got really good prices on mudlights from Go Pro, I got 4 "26" tires from them for $400. and some 27's for $450. installed. Don't know the current prices because the price of rubber has gone up, as well as shipping prices but wouldn't hurt to check them out.

  18. #18

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    I'd stay away from the 589's, they are way heavier than the Mudlites and they will rob you of power. I've got 2 buddies that have them on their Honda's and they hate them. One is a Rubicon and he loses power when he's in the deep mud plus his wheeler steers like a tank. Honestly I don't know how he drives that thing all day without wearing himself out.

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    Thanks for the warning. I read a lot of good reviews about how tough they were, I guess I didn't pay any attention to their weight.

    I guess I'll keep looking for a deal on the Maxxis Zilla that were previously recommended. I like the Mudlights, I've just heard they're prone to puncture.

  20. #20

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    Prone to puncture? I've had mine for 4 years and have yet to have a flat and I do ride in some very rough terrain with lots of rocks and sticks. Not trying to convince you to buy Mudlites but just wanted you to know that they are better than most people say and most have never used them.

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