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Thread: Skinning moose equipment and Notes:

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    Default Skinning moose equipment and Notes:

    I posted this information under ďAlaska Meat and Trophy Care ForumĒ.
    It may not have been the best place to put it, because it appears no one read it.

    I think you will find my information helpful. There are many things a hunter needs to do to insure he returns from the field with eatable meat. I would think knowing how to skin an animal without contaminating the meat is a good start.





    Skinning moose equipment and Notes:

    You may think my list is a overkill, and I agree it is. A moose is a very large animal; a single hind quarter could weigh 200#. I weighed and measured a 3 year old bull moose ham it was 105#, 20 inches wide, 52 inches long and 10 inches thick, this was not a large animal. Manhandling an animal under all conditions and having meat fit to eat takes a lot of effort and experience. There are several videos and pamphlets on the care of game meat. I recommend you learn everything you can before that special day. Having the right equipment will make the job easier.


    14Ē Carpenter saw, this is the best saw I have found for cutting up a moose.

    Fish j-hook, for pulling back the hide, or cut holes for fingers.

    3 pairs of Glove and rubber bands, protection from bugs, and getting cut. The rubber
    bands help keep bugs out.

    Knife and sharpening stone or steel, you only need a 4 to 7 inch knife to process an animal. If you want to save
    the hide a skinning knife puts fewer holes in the hide.

    4ea. locking strap, one person can lift a moose hind quarter with one hand.

    String, to tie off the penis and anus.

    Light 1/8 inch rope 50 feet, to help tie back leg while skinning.

    Tarp, to help keep the meat clean and protect the meat from rain and the sum.

    7 Game bags, 4 large and 3 small ones. On extended hunting trip removing and washing blood soaked bags is
    essential to keep the meat from going bad. TAG game bags are the best bags for washing and drying in the
    field. I use heavy cotton bags.

    Hand soap.

    Headlamp and extra battery

    Water to drink

    2 Candy bars

    Golden Malprin fly bait and plastic bag for fly trap.

    Citric Acid and a spray bottle

    Come-a-long

    Rope 50 feet

    Surveyor tape

    Chain-saw, for cutting brush and quartering a moose (use vegetable oil)

    Insect repellent

    Head net

    Notes:
    1. The first thing I do when skinning a moose or caribou is to tie off the penis and remove the skin and leave the penis attached to the ham. The second thing I do is to cut around the anus and tie it off with string. The reason I do this is because this area can be very nasty and the possibility of contaminations is high. After I have finished working on the back end I wash my knife and hands or put on new gloves.
    I have also found if I start skinning a leg first, I will be tired and do a poor job when it comes to the butt end.

    2. Cut the skin from the underside out to avoid getting hair on the meat.

    3. When skinning an animal your hands become contaminated from touching the hair, do not touch the meat until you have removed your glove or wash your hands.

    4. The best way I have found to debone the ribs is to remove ďallĒ the meat in one piece. Yes it can be done and it is very easy to do on a moose.

    5. I now prefer flaying a moose instead of removing the guts. On Caribou I remove the guts because I can not get to the Tenderloins with out removing the guts.

    6. If I debone the neck I put the meat in a separate bag. The reason I do this is neck meat in a rutting bull can contaminate the other meat.

    7. Back straps and tenderloins are put in a separate bag.

    8. I prefer removing the lower leg at the knee this can be done with a saw. I like using a small sharp pointed knife if I do it correctly itís a lot easier.

    9. The best way to keep game meat in warm or wet weather is on the bone. For several years I would bring out the whole moose in 4 pieces. After skinning and gutting, I would split the moose in half at the third rib. I would then saw the back bone in half making a total of 4 quarters. This was the only method I used on over 10 moose. Most of these were solo hunts, how I was able to this by myself tells me I was a very motivated person when I was younger.

    10. I have a bag that I put the small items in it saves time and I know I have every thing I need in one bag.

    11. I process all my game meat for several reasons, the most important is I end up with the highest quality game meat, and it really is not that hard.

    I hope you find my list and notes helpful itís not possible to cover everything with out writing a book.

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Or...

    The list of supplys along with the instructions that Ruttin Moose provided is very excellent.

    However, when in the bush, I have considerably less stuff in my pack.

    1) Any hunting knife, along with a tiny sharpening steel.
    2) Small hand axe, to whack out the ribs and separate horns/skull from head.
    (A saw is great, I'm just an axe type-of-guy.)
    3) Nine big, sturdy game bags.
    3A) Four hugh bags for quarters.
    3B) One more hugh bag if you are saving the cape.
    3C) Two bags big enough for a side of ribs.
    3D) Two more bags to keep back-straps and tenderloin meat separated form neck and brisket meat.
    4) Cord to tie bags closed and keep them big @$$ black flys off the meat.
    5) Insect repellent.
    6) Strong pack frame with padded shoulder harness, along with cord and bungees.

    Optional Items...
    7) Sm Tarp (but I seldom have one), rubber gloves, head net, friend(s) or client-hunter with strong backs and additional pack frames, back-pain medications.

    I agree that gutting a moose only comsumes time. I leave quarters intact on the bones, to meet regulations.

    The comprehensive list and instructions above, written by Ruttin Moose, is very excellent. But I'm a simple guy, and I just whack, hack, and stack.

    Dennis

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    Default

    I made a couple of changes to the information.

    4ea. locking strap, one person can lift a moose hind quarter ham with one hand.

    9 Game bags, 6 large and 3 small ones. On extended hunting trip removing and washing blood soaked bags is
    essential to keep the meat from going bad. TAG game bags are the best bags for washing and drying in the
    field. I use heavy cotton bags.

    I do not carry everything on the list; I pick the items I need depending on location and type of hunting.

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    Default

    Rutting Moose, Why do you prefer a handsaw over a meatsaw? And if so how many teeth to the inch?

    And also I'm not a fan of the chainsaw to quarter the moose, I have had some that were, and found that they do leave chips of bone enbeded in the meat.

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    Default

    I get by with a knowlage of anatomy, commen sense, good knife, some rope, a rain jacket and a whet stone.
    I leave the hide on and quarter, gut and strip. The hides of little use to me except to keep the flys/mud/sand off.
    a good knife will dissassemble a any Norh American big game, as I just did my Ox
    I Go slow and salvage all but the verabrets.

    Good luck!
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Default yep

    Strangerinastrangeland hit the proverbial nail on the head; you can disassemble any large (or small) game animal with a knife. ALL joints are connected with ligaments, muscles and cartilage - if you are patient, you never have to get bone dust on your meat.

    I'd like to add a roofers trim knife to the list. I know from experience that gut hooks can be a real pain; disposable roofing knives are the biggest asset for skinning, they open the hide up like a zipper with no worry about nicking guts.

    http://www.acehardware.com/product/i...ductId=2459114

    Another variance of mine is that I use the heavy duty canvas bags as the cotton ones contribute to deterioration and do not protect as well. I also like the fact that I can get several seasons with one set of bags.

    If you are like me, I forget some stuff; like bug dope. In this case build a fire upwind from your area and keep putting wet or green stuff on it to keep it smoky; this will do a fair job of keeping the insects at bay and really won't affect the flavor of your moose. You are also going to want to REMEMBER to take some diaper wipes or wash cloth with you to clean up after you clean your moose. A dip in the lake or creek is usually a sobering experience and can be avoided.
    "He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit is better than he who takes a city." ~ Proverbs 16:32

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    Default Cooling

    Wouldn't leaving the hide on just prolong the cooling process? I guess durring Sept that may not be an issue up north. Also it's easier to get the hide off warm.

    I can see how that would keep things clean but when your packing it just adds weight and warmth.

    Not trying to be a troll here, just sharing the way I see it.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    I made a couple of changes to the information.

    4ea. locking strap, one person can lift a moose hind quarter ham with one hand.

    9 Game bags, 6 large and 3 small ones. On extended hunting trip removing and washing blood soaked bags is
    essential to keep the meat from going bad. TAG game bags are the best bags for washing and drying in the
    field. I use heavy cotton bags.

    I do not carry everything on the list; I pick the items I need depending on location and type of hunting.
    Instead os string to tie the guts and anus, I keep a couple of electrical wire bundle plastic ties (like the ones used by the police to cuff people, but a lot smaller). I also take one or two large Ziplock bags, place one over the testicles and penis, and tie it at the base. This keeps urine or hairs from the leg that must show evidence of sex.

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    Good point, Bighorse.
    Cooling the meat isnt a problem this far North. I let the hide stay on untill I get it home, and thats usually the same day I shoot one. If not, I camp along river anyway, and I do (well only a couple times now) skin them out by the boat, where I have tarps to wrap them, after they have hung, skinned, untill I leave.

    If theres snow on the ground, I skin them first, before gutting, and wrap them in the blue type plastic tarp and drag them sledlike to my boat, if Im not using a snowmachine.
    Often there is snow on the ground by the first week of Sept here, and using a blue tarp to drag heavy things across tundra in mid summer is a great way to move such weighty things.
    blue plastic tarps are cheap,light, versatile and make a great sled, as well as a cover, ect.ect.ect.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    I will second the roofers knife, and third the roofers knife.

    It is a great piece of gear for processing an animal, especially a moose, since it is:

    A, really sharp
    B, it cuts from underneath so it doesn't cut hair
    C, light weight, replacements blades are cheap

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Please explain

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    I posted this information under ďAlaska Meat and Trophy Care ForumĒ.

    4ea. locking strap, one person can lift a moose hind quarter with one hand.
    Not sure that I understand this. What kind of locking strap and how can you lift with one hand. Can you explain this in a little more detail for us slow dumb guys.

    Thanks

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    Default Game Bags

    Helpful information,
    Rutting Moose and Alaska True Adventure.
    Not too sure on the strap idea either? But I was surfing the web and it looks and sounds like there are some game bags that suit your game bag needs to a T, they too are fast drying and lightweight.
    I use canvas game bags but found that the more I washed them the more they shrank, smelled, and looked bad, not to mention they were too small for moose to begin with, to heavy etc.
    I think I may try these new bags; they have 8 bag packs, sized for the larger quarters and smaller parts pieces one bag short of your nine but still sounds good!
    Get this there light reflective for those nights when you hear bumps in the night and youíre thinking a bear is dragging your meat off, well sounds like you can now see from afar because of a light reflective attachment, that the bags are ok!
    And if that wasnít enough they even have some kind of lock loop at the top were you attach a Big Game ID tag with a zip lock so your buddy doesnít switch your young bull QUARTER with that chewy old bull he shot.
    Check M out! WWW.BIGGAMEBAGS.COM

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    Default

    [QUOTE=tboehm;550728]Not sure that I understand this. What kind of locking strap and how can you lift with one hand. Can you explain this in a little more detail for us slow dumb guys.


    The problem with moose is there is no way to get a grip on the ham. Then you put a locking strap around the ham, you make it very tight, slip your hand under the strap you now have a hand hole to lift the ham. A moose ham weighs around 105# at least the ones I weighed. It does help if you have some one holding the leg to keep the ham balance, but not necessary. A moose hind quarter weighs around 130# so it still possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Rutting Moose, Why do you prefer a handsaw over a meatsaw? And if so how many teeth to the inch?

    And also I'm not a fan of the chainsaw to quarter the moose, I have had some that were, and found that they do leave chips of bone enbeded in the meat.
    Every time I compare my saw to the one my partners had, mine work better when cutting the big bones.

    The 14Ē Carpenter saw I use has 8 teeth to the inch.
    Iíve know of one hunter who used a battery operated saw-allís in the field.

    I agree a chainsaw makes a mess of the meat and I really donít recommend it.

    At the time I was using the chainsaw the only way I brought a moose home was to cut it up in 4 peaces. Having to saw 8 feet of moose backbone lengthwise with a hand saw, by myself was extremely hard to do. The chainsaw did a 2 hr. job in 5 min.

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    All we used to use when I was a kid was an ax, But then I grew up cutting wood for the fire, so I could cut a pretty straight line. ( Not recomended for the inexperianced you can make a mess out of the job.)

    Thanks R.M.

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    Default Thanks

    Just wanted to say thanks for taking the time and effort to post the tips and info. It'll help me tune up my bag o' stuff. Hope to try it out soon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave@fai View Post
    Just wanted to say thanks for taking the time and effort to post the tips and info. It'll help me tune up my bag o' stuff. Hope to try it out soon.
    I agree...great information guys. I've hunting and field butchered many moose (and other critters), but someone always has a "better way to skin a cat". Thanks from me too.

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    Default still not there

    [QUOTE=Rutting Moose;550817]
    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    Not sure that I understand this. What kind of locking strap and how can you lift with one hand. Can you explain this in a little more detail for us slow dumb guys.


    The problem with moose is there is no way to get a grip on the ham. Then you put a locking strap around the ham, you make it very tight, slip your hand under the strap you now have a hand hole to lift the ham. A moose ham weighs around 105# at least the ones I weighed. It does help if you have some one holding the leg to keep the ham balance, but not necessary. A moose hind quarter weighs around 130# so it still possible.
    This still doesn't tell me what the locking strap is or what it looks like. I appreciate you responding but i guess I need it Barney style. A picture is worth a 1000 words. If you could please show me or post a link to the kind of strap that you are talking about. Thanks

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    You can buy locking straps at Alaska Tent and tarp.


    To prove how easy it is to lift a Bull Moose hind quarter ham using my straps. I took a picture of my 15 year old granddaughter lifting a ham, using only one hand with ease.

    This moose was the largest of three Bull Moose taken in the area.


    What the big deal?
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...h/100_0989.jpg


    Iím so strong.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...h/100_0994.jpg


    Eww, It touched Me!!!!!!
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...h/100_0995.jpg

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