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Thread: Goat hunting saftey.

  1. #1

    Default Goat hunting saftey.

    I was wondering how people utilize rope on Extreme MT.Goat hunts. A few years back a partner of mine introduced me to rappelling on a hunt. It seemed impractical to have that extra weight but it saved alot of time in are particular situation. Does anyone on this forum bring climbing gear on there extreme MT. hunt? I really don't want the exess weight nor do I want to spend hundreds on gear but maybe it is worth it for saftey.

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default No ropes

    No climbing gear on my goat hunts.
    It has nothing to do with being too heavy during the approach, which it is.
    It has everything to do with safety.
    If I started using ropes and climbing gear, I would certainly get myself into positions to get killed.

    Ropes and climbing gear may be great for some...but I choose life.

    Dennis
    Alaska True Adventure Guide Service

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Great answer, Dennis. No goat is worth that much. I've done a little bit of climbing with ropes, but would never consider it while hunting due to the possibility of needing to remove 100+ pounds from the rope-accessed area.

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default (more)

    And...Yes, I have passed on several goats and a few sheep that were not safely accessable, or that were not going to die in a retrievable area.

    But keep an eye on them, or check back in a day. Wait 'em out, and them guys up in the rock castles are gonna move around to an area that is safer to approach, and then....BOOM... (echo-BOom...echo-Boom...echo-boom......sound of falling rocks, followed by client-hunter hootin & celebrating, followed by my grunting while planning the recovery).

    dennis
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  5. #5
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    Guns are for hunting, ropes are for climbing....you don't climb ropes with guns (normally) and you don't hunt with ropes (normally). If it will take ropes and protection type of climbing to shoot or recover a goat (or sheep for that matter) then I give the critter a pass....and usually come back another day hopefully to retrieve that pass. My recommendation would be that you seriously consider the same - either way, good luck.

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Hmmmm and to think I was just starting to look at para gliding as as answer to mountain transportation. Wonder if that would require an overnight wait due to the same day airborn laws...

  7. #7
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default no Rope

    If it requires a rope I don't go there.

  8. #8
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Ditto

    Me too.....no ropes in the goat mountains. They have daily routes that lead them into huntable and more importantly......retreivable terrain. Learn em.

    I do use rope for dropping heavy packs down steep terrain though. Considering it's the same terrain I went up. I find if it's really steep it is just safer to drop the pack down first with a rope and then scramble down packless. This is the same rope I'll have along to set up a pulley system to hoist game meat high in a tree to keep it safe from the brown furry critters. It's not climbing rope though. Just something lightweight 5/16 or 1/4.

    Probably the worst situation is loosing a goat. And I've heard of it happening and it usually involves a repelling distance greater than what one would have gear for. Once you got down in that deep hole......your likely far from where you really want to be.

    You would be suprised at how far a goat will roll. I may have posted this photo before. This is what happens to a beautiful 8.5 yr. old billy that rolls too much. Before you chasten me......we practically stood on this goat before shooting him and cornered him on top of the hill in a realitivly flat spot. He was just a fat ol boy and started rolling before we could stop him. He tasted just fine and we recovered everything we could. The recovery was definatly hair raising. Be careful out there.
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  9. #9
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    Default I used rope

    I took 100' of rope, and crampons on a goat hunt years ago and used both. I did not go places because I had the gear. I went places, and used the gear as needed to provide a safety margin.
    I liken it to having tire chains, a come-a-long, and tow ropes in my truck. I have them just in case. I don't go further because they are in the truck.
    I also only used the rope to assist in coming down the mountain. We never used it to climb.
    I have hunted goats since, in other areas, and did not take either item. But we also had better knowledge of the latter areas than we did on that first hunt. The topography was also much easier to traverse than when we decided to use the rope on that first hunt.

  10. #10
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
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    Default

    My partner and I will each have 100 feet of rope in our packs this year in goat country. The rope will be used for coming down the mountain NOT up. I will gladly carry 100 feet of rope I will not use, rather than need it and not have it. I expect to use the rope for pack lowering.

    If we don't find goats, I can knit me a blanket!

  11. #11
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Or

    A hammock to rest in and let your feet recover.

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