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Thread: Runing wire 10/2 vs 12/2

  1. #1
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    Default Runing wire 10/2 vs 12/2

    May be a real dumb question but I have some 10-2 direct burial I would like to rn from my box to my buckpole and my original cabin. Question is can I then run 12/2 from the first junction box forward through the line? What's the difference between 10/2 and 12/2? Lost.
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

  2. #2
    Supporting Member bushrat's Avatar
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    10/2 is larger in diameter with less loss.
    Wire gauge is a standard method of denoting wire diameter. As the gauge number increases, the diameter of the wire decreases. The smaller the number, the heavier the gauge and the more wattage it can accommodate.
    • #10-2 is 10 gauge wire, the heaviest. For use with the 600W and 900W Transformers.
    • #12-2 is 12 gauge wire, the most common. For use with the 300W, 600W and 900W Transformers.
    • #14-2 is 14 gauge wire and the lightest we offer. For use with the 300W and 600W Transformers.


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    If you can tell us low long each run is and the maximum current or wattage you think you will need at the cabin. I can tell you if it will be ok.
    I assume your talking about using 120v ac.

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    120 volt system - 2% voltage drop


    Amps 14 ga. 12 ga. 10 ga. 8 ga. 6 ga. 4 ga. 2 ga. 1/0 ga. 2/0 ga. 4/0 ga.
    1 450 700 1150 1800 2900 4560 7200
    2 225 350 575 900 1450 2280 3600 5800 7200 10600
    4 100 175 275 450 725 1140 1800 2900 3600 5800
    6 75 120 175 300 475 750 1200 1930 2430 3800
    8 55 85 150 225 355 570 900 1450 1800 2900
    10 45 70 120 180 285 455 725 1150 1450 2300
    15 30 45 70 120 190 300 480 765 960 1500
    20 20 35 55 90 145 225 360 575 725 1160
    25 18 28 45 70 115 180 290 460 580 920
    30 15 24 35 60 95 150 240 385 485 770
    40 28 45 70 115 180 290 360 560
    50 23 36 55 90 145 230 290 460
    100 18 29 46 72 115 145 230
    150 48 77 97 150
    200 36 58 73 110

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    No offense, but if you don't even know the difference between wire gauges, you might be well advised to get an electrician involved in your project. Not only due you run the risk of electrocution, if you run the wrong gauge of wire and overload the circuit you can start a fire.

  6. #6
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks everyone, here is more. No offense taken Paul, I do know a bit about the differences in the wire (larger gauge, more electricity) but that's it. My main question once I fleshed it out in my mind is whether or not it is OK to run the 12-2 from the 10-2 out of the panel. I know you shouldn't run 12 from 14 if that is what is coming from the breaker or so I thought. Anyway the reality is I can't get an electrician here for less than $1500 due to travel so I have to try to run it myself. All plugs and switches are already wired I just need to run the feeder. I ordered 12-2 direct burial but the 10-2 showed up.

    I will be running 120v the first run is 45 feet from the panel to the cabin.

    Second run is 25' from the box to the buckpole.

    I will be running lights and a few plug ins on the system othing crazy. I have 20 amp breakers for the panel.

    Gooch
    Mike
    www.coffmancoveak.com
    Prince of Wales Island

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    How many circuits are you trying to run off of one run of 10/2?

    It sounds like you are trying to power an entire cabin off of the pole with one run. I would recommend you contact an electrician for guidance instead of the forums. I have not been in the code book for several years, and I don't want to give the wrong information. I personally wouldn't recommend attempting to power a cabin or outbuilding with multiple 20A circuits off of one run of 10/2, you'd be asking for fires.

    A licensed electrician that is currently up on the code should be able to answer your questions over the phone, sometimes for a consultation fee instead of the logistics of having them come to the site.

    HTH

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    Supporting Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Mike, you didn't really give us exact info, but based on what you said you should be okay. Just make sure the system isn't hot when you wire it, that it is adequately grounded, and that there are adequate breakers or fuses for what you will run in the cabin.

    You can't run more than 30 amps at 120vac with 10/2. 20amps with 12/2. Would not advise getting near the max.

    So keep in mind if you are running 10/2 to the cabin all the way, whatever you are powering at the cabin can't exceed 30amps collectively. If you're mixing wiring and then going smaller (like to 12/2), you can't exceed 20 amps all together. Even if you had, for example, various circuits inside the cabin and various devices that all had 20amp breakers....you could still exceed the capacity of the wire run to the cabin.

    Best,

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