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Thread: Lamiglass 8 wt and reds

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    Member ChuckD's Avatar
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    Default Lamiglass 8 wt and reds

    I picked up a Lamiglass 8wt from the base and used it for the 1st time last Sunday am on the Kenai for reds. Wow. What a blast? Had a little hole targeted and hooked into about 15 fish.
    Problem was I kept foul hooking them AND was only using a 8lb leader, it kept snapping clean off. That and the fact as a noob I'm sure I lost some due to the lack of experience on a fly rod
    BIG difference from a spinning rod, or as it's been called my telephone pole.
    I've changed the leader and now just need to get back out since I THINK I have it figured out more.
    Can't wait till momma gives me a green light again

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Chuck - I fish with an 8wt as well and usually use a 12lb test leader for early run Russian reds and a 15lb leader for late run reds and silvers. Even so, I still break off a number of flies, particularly on foul hooked fish. That's all part of the fun, though.

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Eight weight Lamiglass rods are the way to go for flipping, IMO. I don't fish the Kenai much, but they work great on the Klutina. It is the same fishing technique, but there is no way you can land a fish with 8lb test on the Klutina, current is just way to fast. I go with 20lb mono at least.

    Fish On!
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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    An 8wt is a great rod for reds and silvers, but I go 12# leader on the early russian and 20-30# leader on the Kenai late run fish. There is some stong current and brute fish to deal with. Up your leader size and have fun.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    The ability to lower your tip and allow a fish to break off is a good thing. I never use more than 15# leaders on an 8wt. 90% of my fishing will be with 10#. A fair caught fish can be landed with 10# even in the current.

    Keep a hand on your tip section if you lower the tip to break a fish off. The broken mono often coils at the break (inside the guides) and can pull the tip section loose and into the river.

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    Default Use a much heavier leader

    I learned long ago that you will hook a lot of fish with a light leader - BUT a large percentage of them will be foul hooked and many will be lost along with the fly and weights.

    Instead I now use a 25# or 30# leader in the Kenai esp. if the area is crowded and I want to get the fish in quickly and get it out of everyone's way. With the heavier leader I may foul hook maybe 1 fish out of 5 - the rest are fair catches. Even for the foul hooked fish I have enough power to get them landed and unhooked and back in the water quickly - again out of everyone's way - other people want to fish, not to watch me horse a foul hooked fish around.

    If I'm playing around in quieter water and not many people around I will will a lighter weight leader and play the fish longer. Even then I will use a 15 or 20 weight - just too many foul hooked fish with ligher weight leaders.
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    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default SPOT on TV!!

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    I learned long ago that you will hook a lot of fish with a light leader - BUT a large percentage of them will be foul hooked and many will be lost along with the fly and weights.

    Instead I now use a 25# or 30# leader in the Kenai esp. if the area is crowded and I want to get the fish in quickly and get it out of everyone's way. With the heavier leader I may foul hook maybe 1 fish out of 5 - the rest are fair catches. Even for the foul hooked fish I have enough power to get them landed and unhooked and back in the water quickly - again out of everyone's way - other people want to fish, not to watch me horse a foul hooked fish around.

    If I'm playing around in quieter water and not many people around I will will a lighter weight leader and play the fish longer. Even then I will use a 15 or 20 weight - just too many foul hooked fish with ligher weight leaders.

    I think 12-15# leader is for coho... But reds, I use simply nothing lighter then 20# flouro..... The number of fish u catch and being about to work th efish around other anglers, quickly get to the bank, and not loose every fly in my box is very important... I have in fact used this heavy of leader for a 6wt.. Breaking the rod is not due to heavy leader but creating mor then a "C" in the rod and typically occurs at the bank....Always fight a fish w/ < then a "C" in it and back up the bank with your fish, then once on shore, go grab your prize, this of course is more difficult if the fish is foulhooked and requires release, then u may have to work hard keeping the fish in the water, cause sockeye never stop motorboating away untill they are bonk or on dry land!

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    Member ChuckD's Avatar
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    I did switch to a 20# leader and that's when I pulled in 2 foul hooked fish. I'm also loaded with 25# just in case I run out of 20#.
    I think I need to remember to lead then with the tip to let them bank themselves, however with my excitement all that went out the window
    Thanks

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    Thumbs up Leader

    20# P-Line CFX Flourocarbon is the way to go!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post

    Breaking the rod is not due to heavy leader but creating mor then a "C" in the rod and typically occurs at the bank....

    Excellent point. Can't break a rod if you keep it at the right angle. You may very well snap a leader, possibly get spooled, likely lose the fish, but you will have your rod when it is all said and done. This also reminds me that the most pressure is applied with the butt of the rod, not the tip/mid section. So if you see someone with an overly arching rod ("big C"), they just look like they are putting pressure on the fish, not actually doing it.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
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    Default Personally I don't lead the drift at all...

    Quote Originally Posted by ChuckD View Post
    I did switch to a 20# leader and that's when I pulled in 2 foul hooked fish. I'm also loaded with 25# just in case I run out of 20#.
    I think I need to remember to lead then with the tip to let them bank themselves, however with my excitement all that went out the window
    Thanks
    You don't have to use "too much weight," you can simply use enough weight to bearly get down and steelhead "nymph" dead drift, extremely effective, alot less foulhooking nad overall seems more effective then the Kenai flip unless the fish are in really slack backeddy, then sometimes I will slightly lead the drift... I also use shot inside heavy wall surgical tuning that is magic when it comes to strike detection and limiting bottom hang ups.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Toobies...

    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    I also use shot inside heavy wall surgical tuning that is magic when it comes to strike detection and limiting bottom hang ups.

    This reminds me of the Toobies system. Tubes, weights, etc.. from Skips Originals. Neat stuff. Just thought I would share in case anyone had not heard of it. Info below....

    http://www.skipsoriginals.com/skipsOriginals.html

    Below is a pic from the Orvis website. I bought mine from Ebay. #2 is the size for salmon/steelhead per product description.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Toobies-Shot-Mag...3A1%7C294%3A50


    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Slinky Weights are very effective at limiting hang up also. Eagle Claw makes some, but I don't care for them much as they are pretty long. Groves Klutina charters sells some that they make right there at their charters that are perfect 1 ounce weights. One can make their own, I think it is parachute cord singed on one end, loaded up with shot, then singed on the other to seal the weight in. I guess it is one of those things "to do" when you are not fishing.

    Fish On!
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  14. #14
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default Slinkies are old school......



    These can be rigged in line too.. These wieghts are all I use and I havn't use slinkes in 15+ years.

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    I lost my 4th section of my 4pc TFO rod (actually my wifes rod, oops) exactly that way. fortunately it had a lifetime garantee.

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    using a "three way swivel" is key to sense or detect the slightest take, IMO. It is much easier than when the weight is directly conetcted to the line, ie split shot. The take travels directly to the rod tip and can be distinguished from the tapping of the suspended weight bouncing off the bottom.

  17. #17

    Thumbs up Is this thread still about Lamiglass Fly rods?

    If, so I just bought a 9wt.. Might give it a run at the Klutina this weekend or silvers in the coming weeks. I have had very good success with my other Lamiglass rods and even got a replacement for cheap when a garage door decided it wanted to see if they could break in 3 pieces. Talk about a sickening sound.. I heard the first crack but couldnt get to the door control button in time...ouch! Got rod replaced for shipping plus 20 bucks...pretty much no questions asked!

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