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Thread: Survival Kit Necessity?

  1. #1
    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default Survival Kit Necessity?

    I read the Alaska State statutes AS 02.35.110 regarding carrying survival kits while flying. I did not see any qualifiers as to whom or when a pilot needs to carry the kit. Does the law require that all pilots, private or commercial, carry the kit at any time they are flying in Alaska? Would that mean that many of the pilots and flight schools flying around Anchorage are doing so illegally because they have no kit? Has anyone been cited for violating the law?

  2. #2

    Default Not sure

    Not sure about the law but I strongly recommend carrying one on every flight. Even a 15 minute flight from any town in alaska can result in an extended stay in the bush.
    I also recommend carrying more survival equipment than just the minimum required by the law. A sat phone and a gun are 2 extras I try not to leave back on the ground.

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    The answer is yes.

    Many pilots and 121/ 135 air taxi operators are in violation of Alaska Statue during their daily operations. Weight and cost being the issue.

    A few years ago the list also required a firearm. Then the list recommended a firearm. Now it is no longer listed.

    I tried to find the list in the most recent Alaska supplement and could not find it. Although that book is laid out about as sensably as a San Fransico parade.


    AS 02.35.110. Emergency Rations and Equipment.


    (a) An airman may not make a flight inside the state with an aircraft unless emergency equipment is carried as follows:

    (1) the following minimum equipment must be carried during the summer months:

    (A) rations for each occupant sufficient to sustain life for one week;

    (B) one axe or hatchet;

    (C) one first aid kit;

    (D) an assortment of tackle such as hooks, flies, lines, and sinkers;

    (E) one knife;

    (F) fire starter;

    (G) one mosquito headnet for each occupant;

    (H) two small signaling devices such as colored smoke bombs, railroad fuses, or Very pistol shells, in sealed metal containers;

    (2) in addition to the equipment required under (1) of this subsection, the following must be carried as minimum equipment from October 15 to April 1 of each year:

    (A) one pair of snowshoes;

    (B) one sleeping bag;

    (C) one wool blanket or equivalent for each occupant over four.

    (b) However, operators of multi-engine aircraft licensed to carry more than 15 passengers need carry only the food, mosquito nets, and signalling equipment at all times other than the period from October 15 to April 1 of each year, when two sleeping bags, and one blanket for every two passengers shall also be carried. All of the above requirements as to emergency rations and equipment are considered to be minimum requirements which are to remain in full force and effect, except as further safety measures may be from time to time imposed by the department.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4

    Default

    Not all flight schools are in violation of course. Warbelows specifically carries all of the above in their 172's for example. But yes all planes, all pilots, including visiting ones.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I tried to find the list in the most recent Alaska supplement and could not find it. Although that book is laid out about as sensably as a San Fransico parade.


    LOL you got that right! Last weekend I flew into Lake Hood, Merrill Field and Talkeetna and with all the special procedures listed in no logical order at all I pretty much flew with my feet because it took both hands to keep flipping back and forth through that blessed thing trying to find everything

  6. #6
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    The survival gear requirement is State law. Until the Troopers start ramp checking you there's no threat of being cited. Even post-rescue I've never heard of anyone's survival gear being questioned. That said, my survival gear pack is standard equipment for cross country flights. If I'm relocating my plane in the local area for maintenance I don't take it.

  7. #7
    Member mit's Avatar
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    No one has ever been wrote up for this. If anyone has please post proof.
    Tim

  8. #8

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    Both Mit & Mr. Pid are correct. However, it's unfortunate that this is something that is a law instead of common sense. Another law that is not enforced but exists nonetheless.
    It takes little horizontal travel to make for a difficult time walking back let alone a sheep hunt. Imagine you get weathered in suddenly while out bird hunting on Beluga. Imagine it takes a couple of days for the weather to clear even for the 35 minute flight home and all you have is a fleece top and a hat in the gear area of your plane. Sat phone, SPOT and the other devices are fantastic in theory provided those that you're depending on can even get to you. If you can't take of yourself, who's to blame then?

  9. #9
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    APEX,

    I had an experience last fall that was alarmingly similar to the scenario you mentioned. No imminent threat or injury, just plain stuck on the ground in awful weather in soaking wet clothes. As soon as I got home I upgraded my survival gear from being minimally compliant to a much more complete package. Getting dry and warm is now a priority. Well worth the 5 pounds or so that it added.

  10. #10
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Photos of my survival gear box have been posted here and on supercuib.org. So I personally believe in carrying gear. Plus I wear a float survival vest since most of my gear will probably sink to the bottom of a 300 ft deep lake.

    That said I can see why some 135 taxi operations do not carry all the required gear for all the passengers. I do not agree, but I can see why they don't.

    Billy-Bob the summer hire 135 pilot takes the company 206 to Seldovia with 5 passengers and 6 cases of beer. Then he has to fold up the seats and take 3 totes full of fish back to Homer along with one passenger.

    Carrying one week of food for 6 persons and a pile of blankets/sleeping bags would really cut into the profit margin. Both in space and weight.

    I can also see this as being an OUT for an insurance company.

    Almost all insurance policies say that they are void if the pilot violates a law or FARs.
    So if Whittle Prop Air hurt a bunch of folks during a bad landing and if the passenegrs say there was NO or not enough survival gear. Then the insurance company would be off the hook and Whittle Prop Air would loose everything they own.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskaflyer331 View Post
    LOL you got that right! Last weekend I flew into Lake Hood, Merrill Field and Talkeetna and with all the special procedures listed in no logical order at all I pretty much flew with my feet because it took both hands to keep flipping back and forth through that blessed thing trying to find everything
    Ah, not to be a smart Aleck,but have ever considered reviewing it BEFORE you fly?

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim in anchorage View Post
    Ah, not to be a smart Aleck,but have ever considered reviewing it BEFORE you fly?
    Not to be a smart alec, but do you have 14 CFR 93.51 et al memorized?

    When Jim in Anchorage leaves Anchorage and flies to Denali does he memorize all of the park reporting points and frequencies in advance so he can spit them out like a person who lives and flies here every day? Or does he use common sense, brief on them before takeoff and have them available to him in the air so he can refer to them - if he can find them in the nightmare that is the Supplement?

    Of course I reviewed them. My point is that the Alaska Supplement is organized in a fashion that only Rube Goldberg would love.

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