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Thread: Tight Spot in Redhawk Barrel

  1. #1
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    Default Tight Spot in Redhawk Barrel

    My 4" Redhawk .45 Colt has a tight spot in the barrel where the barrel threads into the frame. I read about Taylor throating to eliminate this problem, and am wondering if anybody here has ever had this done and is willing to share their experience and or comments, especially if you have had the work done in AK. Thanks.

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    If the revolver shoots better than you I would not worry about it.

    How is the accuracy off the bench at 25 yards?
    Tennessee

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    Mike, welcome to our little club, good to have ya.

    Here goes, straight from the heart, as always.

    I am extremely skeptical of many things with regard to this. Mayhap you can enlighten me by answering some questions.

    How do you know there is a tight spot in the barrel?

    How bad is the accuracy of the gun presently?

    What bullets are you planning to shoot?

    Is the forcing cone clean and symetrical with good transition to the rifling?

    Do you know what Taylor throating is?

    Any revolver with the correct cylinder alignment and gap, with a good smooth 11 degree forcing cone, is capable of shooting better than anyone on the internet, including me. An insignificant machine burr in the forcing cone can make a good revolver shoot nice tight 6" groups at 25 yards, corrected it could be a 1" grouper. I have a theory that I have applied to myelf and my guns for decades, it has served me well. Here it is; 99 percent of accuracy is the shooter, the rest is equipment. To apply that to the revolver; 99 percent of revolver accuracy is the shooter, the rest is forcing cone and cylinder alignment.

    First of all, all gun barrels have tight spots. How tight needs to be discussed. Secondly the tightest spot in any revolver barrel is where it screws to the frame. Thirdly (or tertiaryly??) Slugging the barrel and feeling a tug with a soft lead slug as you push it through isn't an accurate or reliable way of measuring barrel diameter. What is the diameter of the slug? Was the barrel clean and lubed before pushing it through?

    It isn't uncommon for a factory revolver to have a bad (relative term) forcing cone. It also is a simple and inexpensive process to fix this little problem. If timing is good and throats (in the cylinder, this time) are correctly sized and you use bullets correctly sized to match these throats and bore, it will shoot, very well with a tight spot in the barrel.

    I'm not saying Taylor throating doesn't work, it is just that I've never found a revolver that needs it.
    Last edited by Murphy; 07-23-2009 at 20:10.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Thanks for the reply. To answer your questions:

    How do you know there is a tight spot in the barrel? Barrel was extremely leaded when I bought the revolver. I scrubbed it good with an old bore brush wrapped with a piece of copper kitchen scrubber, then polished it with JB Bore Paste. When polishing, there was noticeable constriction in the barrel thread area in front of the forcing cone.

    How bad is the accuracy of the gun presently? It was pretty bad (4-5") before I bought a Manson cylinder throat reamer and opened the throats up to .4525. It is better now.

    What bullets are you planning to shoot? LBT 325 grain.

    Is the forcing cone clean and symetrical with good transition to the rifling? It looks ok to the eyeball, but I'm going to buy a forcing cone gauge and see how much room I have to play with. If so, I think I will cut the cone a little, as the factory cone is very rough.

    Do you know what Taylor throating is? Yes. I was hoping to kill the rough cone and barrel thread choke "birds" with one stone by Taylor throating. I was looking at the Clymer Taylor throating tool and doing it myself, but they do not make it anymore.

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    Thaks for your informative response. It is hard to tell what one knows or can do from the internet blog.

    Your gun may be choked more than what would allow good accuracy. That's rare. Id'clean some more and make sure the rifling is crisp in that first 1/4" or so. Lead build up in that stainless revolver will be hard to see especially after you've got the lead deposits polished shiney clean. I hate it when folks shoot and shoot those soft lead loads until a 45 becomes a 38 from the build up. Your cleaning technique seems like it would get it out but it does take some scrubbing. A Lewis would help some. What I would want to do here is get it down to clean bare metal the lube it and push a soft lead slug down the bore feeling all the way, of course, then measure the results. My point is that this restriction you feel could still be lead deposits. It could be actual choking from threading the barrel in but I'm still skeptical.

    The throats and the cone are vital to revolver accuracy but of course shooting .452" bullets through a .440" barrel will kill that for us. That is only .012" which we really cant see if it is the full circumference of that first 1/2". I don't think the Taylor technique hurts anything except you cannot go back without a new barrel. It will usually boost velocity slightly and take care of a problem such as erosion in the barrel or constriction but I don't think it should be done to correct a bad cone or to "improve accuracy" and if it cost as much as a new barrel I'd spend my money on the barrel. You should also consider sending it back to Ruger and ask for a new barrel, they'll pay shipping.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    I've had both a ruger super redhawk 44 mag and a redhawk 357 mag that had tight spots, and I taylor throated them. After the taylor throating the 44 would shoot 1 1/2" at 25 yds, likely better.

    The 357 was a real dog, it strugled to print 4-5" at 25 yds, and it was rare to get any hits in the black at 50 yds. After taylor throating the groups are below 2" at 25 yds, though I haven't done any load work to see how well it shoots.

    If you do have a tight ruger, then Taylor throating is a good way to get rid of the constriction.

    Oh, I forgot to mention that both guns had the forcing cones cleaned up, but still didn't group terribly well.

    I don't know anyone that has shot a gun with a Taylor throat that has anything bad to say about them.

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