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Thread: Skinning moose equipment list and notes.

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    Default Skinning moose equipment list and notes.

    You may think my list is a overkill, and I agree it is. A moose is a very large animal; a single hind quarter could weigh 200#. I weighed and measured a 3 year old bull moose ham it was 105#, 20 inches wide, 52 inches long and 10 inches thick, this was not a large animal. Manhandling an animal under all conditions and having meat fit to eat takes a lot of effort and experience. There are several videos and pamphlets on the care of game meat. I recommend you learn everything you can before that special day. Having the right equipment will make the job easier.


    14Ē Carpenter saw, this is the best saw I have found for cutting up a moose.

    Fish j-hook, for pulling back the hide, or cut holes for fingers.

    3 pairs of Glove and rubber bands, protection from bugs, and getting cut. The rubber
    bands help keep bugs out.

    Knife and sharpening stone or steel, you only need a 4 to 7 inch knife to process an animal. If you want to save
    the hide a skinning knife puts fewer holes in the hide.

    4ea. locking strap, one person can lift a moose hind quarter with one hand.

    String, to tie off the penis and anus.

    Light 1/8 inch rope 50 feet, to help tie back leg while skinning.

    Tarp, to help keep the meat clean and protect the meat from rain and the sum.

    7 Game bags, 4 large and 3 small ones. On extended hunting trip removing and washing blood soaked bags is
    essential to keep the meat from going bad. TAG game bags are the best bags for washing and drying in the
    field. I use heavy cotton bags.

    Hand soap.

    Headlamp and extra battery

    Water to drink

    2 Candy bars

    Golden Malprin fly bait and plastic bag for fly trap.

    Citric Acid and a spray bottle

    Come-a-long

    Rope 50 feet

    Surveyor tape

    Chain-saw, for cutting brush and quartering a moose (use vegetable oil)

    Insect repellent

    Head net

    Notes:
    1. The first thing I do when skinning a moose or caribou is to tie off the penis and remove the skin and leave the penis attached to the ham. The second thing I do is to cut around the anus and tie it off with string. The reason I do this is because this area can be very nasty and the possibility of contaminations is high. After I have finished working on the back end I wash my knife and hands or put on new gloves.
    I have also found if I start skinning a leg first, I will be tired and do a poor job when it comes to the butt end.

    2. Cut the skin from the underside out to avoid getting hair on the meat.

    3. When skinning an animal your hands become contaminated from touching the hair, do not touch the meat until you have removed your glove or wash your hands.

    4. The best way I have found to debone the ribs is to remove ďallĒ the meat in one piece. Yes it can be done and it is very easy to do on a moose.

    5. I now prefer flaying a moose instead of removing the guts. On Caribou I remove the guts because I can not get to the Tenderloins with out removing the guts.

    6. If I debone the neck I put the meat in a separate bag. The reason I do this is neck meat in a rutting bull can contaminate the other meat.

    7. Back straps and tenderloins are put in a separate bag.

    8. I prefer removing the lower leg at the knee this can be done with a saw. I like using a small sharp pointed knife if I do it correctly itís a lot easier.

    9. The best way to keep game meat in warm or wet weather is on the bone. For several years I would bring out the whole moose in 4 pieces. After skinning and gutting, I would split the moose in half at the third rib. I would then saw the back bone in half making a total of 4 quarters. This was the only method I used on over 10 moose. Most of these were solo hunts, how I was able to this by myself tells me I was a very motivated person when I was younger.

    10. I have a bag that I put the small items in, it saves time and I know I have every thing I need in one bag.

    11. I process all my game meat for several reasons, the most important is I end up with the highest quality game meat, and it really is not that hard.

    I hope you find my list and notes helpful itís not possible to cover everything with out writing a book.

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    2 knifes

    ATV ( if i can not get the ATV to it...it won't be shot but you would be amazed where i can get one)

    game bags...

    head lamp if needed

    2 hours

    done

    i do the fillet as you do.... but also average 4-7 a year under my knife..unless your a first timer... then i make you do it just so you know what you did....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Default Game Bags Pre Treat

    Does anyone use citrus mixed with a pepper, pepper sauces or similar to pre-treat their bags? I read something awhile ago and cannot find it again.
    I used it with our bears this spring but the time from kill to process was so short that I really did not get a feel for the effectiveness of the pre treatment. Thx

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    Great list RM. It made me add a few items to my butcher bag. What do you mean by a locking strap? I have an idea but wanted to be sure.

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    Thumbs up Simple

    Alaskan Knifes Brown Bear Cleaver
    Puma White Hunter Knife
    Gransfors Bruks Hunter's Axe
    Puma Hunters Pal Knife
    Tarp

    Camp and ATV less than 300 yards away.....with meat Trailer.
    Leave the Hide on and skin when I get it home....to Delta Meats the next day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Bush Hunter View Post
    Alaskan Knifes Brown Bear Cleaver
    Puma White Hunter Knife
    Gransfors Bruks Hunter's Axe
    Puma Hunters Pal Knife
    Tarp

    Camp and ATV less than 300 yards away.....with meat Trailer.
    Leave the Hide on and skin when I get it home....to Delta Meats the next day.
    I have a Gransfors Hunters Axe and I used it on a moose, should say misused. I thought I could cut some bone-and did, but the axe suffered. It looked like a serrated edge afterwards. Do you cut bone with yours of some other use? Thanks, Mark

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    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    2 knifes

    ATV ( if i can not get the ATV to it...it won't be shot but you would be amazed where i can get one)

    game bags...

    head lamp if needed

    2 hours

    done

    i do the fillet as you do.... but also average 4-7 a year under my knife..unless your a first timer... then i make you do it just so you know what you did....

    Vince dose allot more moose than I but we have the same list.......minus the ATV. I find popping joints easier and less mess than cutting bone, saw or not. Pretreat the bags and keep in a plastic bag. BTW you don't need to keep the hole penis just the sheath.
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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    no go on the pics moose ... get a moved or deleted message.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  10. #10

    Default Great Checklist

    Rutting Moose, Great list, really got me thinking. One thing I use is one of the kevlar gloves (usually used on fish) on my non-knife hand (with a vinyl glove underneath). I'm either good at sharpening knives (not really) or have a propensity to cut myself. :-)

    Would you be so kind as to elaborate on #4, removing all the rib meat in one piece? I'm a visual person and just not seeing it.

    Thanks!

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    2 knives- diamond sharpener for touchup
    Wyoming saw- for brush and bones
    6 game bags
    1 small tarp

    skin it, remove quarters, backstrap, neck and rib meat, roll it over do the same, slit the gut open, get some liver for the wifey and the tenderloins.

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    Thumbs up I have one item on that list..

    just take Vince along.

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    Wonderful list, however I have found a great little product that will eleminate the need for a cumbersome come-a-long. Its called a HitchMaster. Its a convienant rope pulley system that has NO moving parts. Works like a dream for alot of different applications. Dont know if I can put the web addy to see it in here or not, so I will try and if I am in violation of rules I sincerely appologize. But this is one handy dam tool and once you use one, you will buy five. akcooltools dot com look under HitchMaster.. I was told that anyone using AOF will get a 10% discount just by mentioning AOF. Cant beat that!
    I give thanks to the vetrans, as they have aided in my priviledge to hunt and fish the great State of AK. and alow me to sleep safely at night.

  14. #14
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trapper_Rich View Post
    Wonderful list, however I have found a great little product that will eleminate the need for a cumbersome come-a-long. Its called a HitchMaster. Its a convienant rope pulley system that has NO moving parts. Works like a dream for alot of different applications. Dont know if I can put the web addy to see it in here or not, so I will try and if I am in violation of rules I sincerely appologize. But this is one handy dam tool and once you use one, you will buy five. akcooltools dot com look under HitchMaster.. I was told that anyone using AOF will get a 10% discount just by mentioning AOF. Cant beat that!
    here is the link rich! http://akcooltools.com/hitchmaster.html

    kind of interesting gadget, how much have you lifted with this?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Removing moose meat from ribs.

    I start at the bottom rib, letís call it # 12.
    The first Cut is along the length of the rib.
    Then cut under the meat next to the top of the rib, separating the meat from the top and then cut down the opposite side. You will also need to cut along each end of the rib freeing up the meat. The 12th rib is now clean of meat.

    Holding the meat up, cut under the length of 11th rib and down the opposite side removing the meat. Them cut along the ends of the rib. Continue process for ribís #10, #9, etc.

    If you roll the meat into a log it will help keep it clean.

    If you want to keep the ribs and meat together, using a small sharp knife you can remove the ribs by cutting the joints at the top and bottom of the ribs.

    I thought about using a kevler glove, my problem is I never have enough water around to wash the blood out. You could use a heavy glove or put a light glove over the kevler to keep out the blood.

  16. #16

    Thumbs up

    engine block without tranny, pulled snow machine out of ditch by myself, and lifted a few quarters of moose easily with them--its the simplest, easiest tool I ever owned. I used some parachute cord to tie down the wings of a super cub during a 60 mph wind and worked like a jewel.
    Last edited by Trapper_Rich; 12-13-2009 at 16:55. Reason: learning how to spell
    I give thanks to the vetrans, as they have aided in my priviledge to hunt and fish the great State of AK. and alow me to sleep safely at night.

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    Default List update

    I updated my list, correcting some mistakes; #10 is a new method for cutting up a moose. #13 is the location of other posts on caring for moose meat. Post #2 by Alaska True Adventure is worth reading and following. It goes to prove you do not need a lot of equipment to process a moose.

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