Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: DG477 Goat Hunt Food Planning

  1. #1
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    329

    Default DG477 Goat Hunt Food Planning

    Coming down to about a month before my 10 day?? Goat hunt on Kodiak and have been researching my food choices. We are flying in with Seahawk to a Mtn lake ( 1651,1790) were brought up, anyway looks like weight is not going to be to big a concern and am trying to get my food planned for 2 people.
    My concern would be cooking anything and attracking Bears, Anyone hunt these high Mtn area's? Bears a problem? or is there a fish run that will keep most busy and down low?
    I just would hate to live on freeze dried stuff when I didn't have to. I am looking at maybe some fresh eggs, maybe a steak or 2, other 1 pan wonders.
    Anyone been up there late August, early September that could fill me in?
    Thought I would give a shout out here before I touch base with Rolan in a few weeks.
    Thanks
    Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

  2. #2
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    I know a friend who had over a dozen visitors to his camping area in a 10 day hunt last fall, and also lost his goat to a boar that was faster than he. So yes, I would keep yer guard up, dotn worry about what you cook so much as to how you keep your camp and it's cleanliness. Fish runs are all dependent on how the run goes, how close you are to a spawning river etc. Put your kitchen in a bear fence away from your camp that is also in a bear fence
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  3. #3
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    329

    Default Fenced in

    I'll be fenced in for sure, but just don't want to put out any major advertisments that it's dinner time. I'll put together another small bear fence area awy from camp for food. Have some left over fence stuff from when we had horses in MT and should work fine.
    Thanks
    Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

  4. #4
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Food Ideas

    That sounds like a sweet trip you have planned. I take it your going up to a medium elevation with a Beaver and spiking up from there and your looking for base camp foods you'll enjoy.

    It sounds like you've got your meat covered with a few nice steaks. Of course a full course breakfast might be in order sometimes: Eggs, Hashbrowns, ect.......

    One thing I really like to bring on a long hunt is the fixin's for a big ol' salad. I'm not joking either. Your out in the bush for a long time and getting some delicious greens in ya helps. I also like to have a few choice fruit items in camp. Along with a huge bag of trail mix.

    I also advocate for a great multigrain cereal in huge amounts to fuel up for big hill climbs. And what AK hunting adventure would be complete without some smoked and jarred reds.

    If I was comming thats what I'd be adding.

    If you can.....get a cook shelter situated. You usually are gonna be cooking when the weather is foul. When it's nice you should be on the hill hunting.

  5. #5
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    One thing I really like to bring on a long hunt is the fixin's for a big ol' salad. I'm not joking either. Your out in the bush for a long time and getting some delicious greens in ya helps. I also like to have a few choice fruit items in camp. Along with a huge bag of trail mix.
    The 1LB containers of Spinach from Costco will last about 10 days if you dont mix it with anything else and keep it cool
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    74

    Default

    I hunted DG477 last year. We saw Bear(s) everyday and even had few that came too close for confort, we had a sow and cub that hung arround camp. I think that a fence should help immensely.

  7. #7
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    On float trips, we don't take coolers so our options are far limited compared to yours. Below is a brief rundown of how we do it. Perhaps it might give you some ideas at any rate....


    For breakfast, we like bagels with the precooked bacon packs. The Boars Head comes in two seperate pouches which is convenient. Oscar Meyer comes in one bigger pack. We like block cheese and Harvest Food eggs (see their website for all kinds of great products). I use their powdered oil/shortening in my dutch oven. Works just like regular oil but without the weight/mess. We also take hot oatmeal and recently discovered Richmoor cold cereal. Just add water type. It comes in granola with strawberries and granola with raspberries. Both are delicious. I am 6' 6" and weigh 300 lbs. So I will buy 4 packs of the cereal and vacuum seal. 2.5 for me and 1.5 for my wife. If you eat a 2,000 calorie a day diet normally, perhaps one pack would be enough for breakfast. They taste great. I buy mine from www.wildernessdining.com This site sells lots of other great food items. Check out their website for all kinds of food related items. Great selection of hard to find items. I get the peanut butter and jelly individual packs there too. Great for putting on flour tortilla wraps or bagels for snacks/lunches. Very convenient. Comes with strawberry or grape jelly. These are larger packs and have plenty to make a sandwich or bagel. They also sell cheese in packs like this. That with some pilot bread would make a great snack/lunch.

    For lunch we take Mountain House Pro Paks. Vacuum sealed and slightly smaller portions than the regular Mtn House meals, they pack small and light yet are plenty for lunch. They come in about 10 different types. Chilli-Mac, spaghetti, and Lasagna are my favorites. Go to the Mountain House website and order there. One nice thing about having these meals for lunch everyday is that it makes things simple. No meal planning. Save that for the dinners. Keep it simple. Just boil some water riverside and have lunch. This route also saves weight compared to many other food ideas.

    For dinner, we go through more trouble. For the purpose of good morale perhaps. We take Darn Good (brand) dried chilli bags and make Jiffy cornbread in the dutch oven. We also make grayling gumbo. We take Zatarains Gumbo (dry mix) and slivers of about 2 lbs of grayling. Cook slow while the Bisquick garlic biscuits cook in the aluminum GSI 10" dutch oven. It only weighs 4 lbs and can be found on the wilderness dining website above. Also at Campmor.com. We cook fish for about 3/7 meals too. Usually dolly vardon (arctic char). We get Idaho instant potatoes (garlic is our favorite). We will make garlic bisuits in the dutch oven to go with. We also make mac and cheese to go with fish. Simple things like that. Some of the easy to make Suddenly Salad brands are nice too. They have a ranch and italian cold pasta salad. Great sides for a fish meal. We have also packed the 10" pita pizza deals. Take the pizza sauce in the bags and some block cheese to grate. Two person may be enough. And of course the pepperoni. In a pinch, we will just have one of the extra Mtn House Pro Paks. Maybe too tired to cook or got into camp late. Bad weather and such. I always carry 2-3 extra Mtn House Pro Paks. One tip, tape a disposable plastic spoon to the lasagna packs. The cheese in them is nearly impossible to get off your standard Lexan spoon. We burn the disposable spoon with the bag the meal was in. Dishes done.

    Save the clean lexan spoon for stirring the 100 proof peppermint schnapps into the hot chocolate. Also, Captain Morgans rum and hot apple cider is a good camp fire drink. For other times of the day, we take Crystal Light sticks and perhaps one gatorade packet per person/per day.

    For deserts, we take the Backpackers Pantry (brand) cheese cake and cream pie (same things). I love lemon, but chocolate mousse, strawberry, banana, and dark chocolate are great. Just add and stir some cold water into the bag, then sprinkle the graham cracker crumbs on top (included in the pack) and then let it sit and think for about 10 minutes. This desert must be tried. Amazing stuff.

    For snacks, the normal fare. Dried fruit and beef jerky vacuum seals to very small packs. Leave out the mango and apricots as it makes everything sticky. We love Cliff bars as they can get squished and are not effected by heat. Comes in about 20 flavors. And of course some home made gorp with the larger size M&M's.

    For coffee, only Peet's arabian mocha java or major dickisons blend will do. Order online from Peet's and specify that you want press pot grind. You do this when finalizing the order. Get a french press to take on the trip. I have a stainless model that I got from Campmor. I think they quit carrying that model, but REI and others carry it. GSI also makes some lexan french presses. They work fine, I just preferred the stainless model. Point is, this makes great coffee and it is the perfect way to start a day on a float trip. We get small 16,8,4 ounce nalgene bottles (campmor) and put the coffe, powdered creamer, and sweetener in them. Good stuff man.





    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  8. #8
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    329

    Default Thanks Dan

    I actually read this from a previous post in the archives and pulled some good info from it on my food search
    My big concern was cooking in the area and attracting bears. I just wanted to get away from adding boiling water to a pouch and enjoy some real food, but not at the cost of inviting Yogi and friends to the picinic to hang around for the duration of my hunt.
    Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    This may not be the most responsible advice, but I would not be overly concerned if I were you. In hindsight, I have worried far too much about bears on most my previous trips to Alaska. Mostly float trips in NW and SW Alaska, we have never had any problems. Most trips have been about ten days long and we have seen bears on all trips. We did have two walk into camp but they were just doing their thing. Both got to about 20 yards from us. We were in their back yard you know. The first one saw us while we were eating dinner. He walked around the willows and there we were. He high tailed it. The second bear walked into camp at 0300 on a rainy night. Flash light was all it took for this guy to run off. In both instances, they looked as scared as I was (if that is possible). I would just keep a very clean camp and try to enjoy myself. You will obviously be armed and from reading here, I can see that you are very well informed. So that is two things you have going for you. Let the wildlife add to the trip man. Don't get me wrong, taking necessary precautions is a great thing, but don't get so concerned that you lay in the tent at night with Timothy Treadwell thoughts running through your head. I speak from experience here. In my opinion, it is just not needed. If there was any specific food I would not cook in camp, it would be bacon perhaps. Smelly foods that can carry a long ways. The type of bacon we use doesn't have to be cooked, just warmed up, so I consider it a viable option. As you are aware, the clean camp, common sense approach will take you far. Have a great trip man. Some basic info you probably already know is in the below link.

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...=bears.bearfax



    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    We hunted that two years ago and didn't have any bear problems for most of the trip. Of course we spiked out and ate mountain house. When we were back at the lake, the other camp grilled bratwurst and that night a bear came through camp. Fortunately it left in a hurry from all the yelling. If you cook anything that will put scent into the air, I would expect it to be investigated.

  11. #11
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill S. View Post
    If you cook anything that will put scent into the air, I would expect it to be investigated.
    Thats why I eat steak and potatoes out moose hunting. Never know when a bear is in the area.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  12. #12

    Default Hunted DG477 last year...

    at the start of the season when there should be lots of fish in the rivers. There were 20 + bears working berries on a mountain face within a half of a mile from our base camp. You will have bears in the area, in fact you will see them come right over the peaks of the mountains. We saw them glassing for goats. We did not and did not need to spend the night away from our base camp. This unit has a history of bear DLP killings. We almost had to shoot a bear that would not stop coming. Shaking a 6' tall tripod over my head finally scared him when shooting did not! You cannot be too prepared for a bear encounter on your hunt. I have hunted AK for more than 17 years and have had lots of brown bear encounters all over the state. No difference here than anywhere else. Use a fence that works and know how to use it, keep a clean camp and be prepared. I have a livestock fencer like we used for moving cattle and it is MUCH stronger than the D cell battery models. Weighs a little more but sure sleep better! Good luck on your hunt, lots of goats there and beautiful country. BTW - Plenty of nice bucks there too, but still had a couple of weeks in the velvet so we didn't shoot any.

  13. #13

    Default

    Formerly Montana Bob

    You really need to rememeber for just one moment where you are going and what lives there. Your talking about Kodiak Island, the south end, where there are many many bears. I would think twice about grilling steaks at any of the lakes in DG477. I know a guy that is still in litigation over being charged by a sow with cubs that took both their billys from their spike camp, but left them with capes and horns. Its not a place to screw around with the possibilities of bear encounters, you WILL see bears. I would keep a clean camp, low scent foods, and keep your eyes and ears open. Its not the mature bears you will deal with, its the juveniles and some in tow of a sow. Theres lots of bears in the high country that time of year. Be smart and be safe!

  14. #14
    Member TWB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    3,573

    Default

    This little guy was a frequent to a friends camp a few years ago. He too didnt care much for the sound of a gun. If bears truly are attuned to a gunshot being a dinner bell. I wouldnt do much shootin from camp, LOL.

    Same trip they lost a nice billy to a bear.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  15. #15
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    329

    Default Thanks

    for all the reply's and PM's. I will keep the cooking to a minimum with no stinky stuff. On another note everyone who got back with me said they did get into Goats which is a good thing. So the trip should be a good one even if I only get to use the camera.
    Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

  16. #16
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default goats and bears

    Good luck man......

    That sounds really intimidating. Thats a heap of bad bear encounters in your area. I'd be looking for bears before you shoot your goat.

    I had three come out at the gun range here in Sitka this week. I was blasting away and they came out right in the line of fire. Sow with two in tow. She didn't seem at all bothered. We had one take and kill a coworkers Newfoundland (dog) two days ago her in Sitka. The buggers are just so unpredicatable.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •