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Thread: Kenai Boat Dippers Rescued

  1. #1
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default Kenai Boat Dippers Rescued

    Looks like four fellas are lucky to be alive after their boat capsized while dipping the Kenai. From personal experience, most folks don't wear life jackets while dipnetting. I'm as guilty as the rest, but this is a good example of why the bulk is worth the trouble.

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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Just another freak accident. I'm honestly surprised we don't see fatalities during dipping season considering how fast everyone gets out there.

    My .02 but I think it should be a "No Wake" zone from the bridge, to the launch.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    Thumbs up one word

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    Default Two words

    Inflatable Lifejacket

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Trouble rule #1- deploy anchor

    Surprisingly scary accident for a quiet day on the Kenai.
    Good story to learn from.

    Years ago I started boating by renting a fishing skiff from a Chesapeake Bay area source. The proprieter reviewed a few safety points in the deal and #1 was to set the anchor as soon as you have motor problems.
    In addition to the point about lifejackets, is that having/using an anchor can avert bigger problems in lost power situations:

    "We lost our engine after a Coast Guard safety inspection. We were floating downstream toward the dock hoping to get it restarted. We floated into a mooring buoy and line. With the current and the angle of the boat, we capsized within 20 seconds of hitting it," Long said.

  6. #6
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    glad all ended up ok - does anyone know what the type of boat was the flipped?

    That being said - there are people out there participating in the Boat Dipnet fishery that really need to re-think thier decision about putting thier tiny boat with a tiny engine in that river. Or any other boat that you know cant handle much weather or waves. That river at times can be like running back to port during a small craft advisory.

    If you do, dont fish the lower section where all the bigger boats are running - go somewhere else where you wont be swamped. Not only are those little guys an obsticle course - they are endangering thier lives and the lives of the people that will try to rescue them when they go over.

    I've seen it all down there including the two guys on the waverunner opening weekend. I'd just like to say how cool I think you guys are, and how much I wish I could be just like you. Not.

    Leave the Waverunners, Scanoes, Canoes, Small jons, Drift boats, Dingys, 12' lake boats and some of those rafts at home.

  7. #7

    Default Thanks for the concern.

    We stay away from the lower section, the straight shot west of the Kenai boat launch. We understand the risk involved for us, our families, and those around us on the river. If I had a bigger boat, I would certainly use it. Since I don't, I have to make use of the resources I do have. I just have to watch out for the guys that drive like they own the river.

    When we've gotten in trouble in the past with a net in the prop, we row over to the bank and fix it. We bail everybody's wake out of the stern with a bucket and go back fishing to feed those who can't go.

    I've been on the waters of Resurrection Bay, Aialik Bay, and Kachemak Bay since pre-1964. I have great respect for the ocean and for those who make their living on it.

    Listen, in the old days men in Southeast would troll all day long using oars. Bristol Bay double enders would be out for days and days at a time. What about the first guy on the Beaufort Sea to figure out how to catch a whale on the end of a pointed stick tied to a skin-covered skiff? Just because they didn't have the shiny gear and the job was dangerous doesn't mean they stayed home and starved.

    If you've got the money for the big rigs, that's great. Big boats go down too from bad circumstances, bad judgment, and lack of skill.

    ~tr

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    You are absolutely correct - big boats can get into big trouble too, and just as fast. You are obviously considerate of your fellow dippers.

    Plenty of river available out there for all. People just need to understand the basic seamanship rules and most dont have a clue, thats kinda what I am saying. I am not saying the people that got swamped didn't, it sounds like those guys had it all together.

  9. #9

    Default Painful to watch

    It was incredibly painful to watch the boat get pulled out of the water. No offense to the guy running the forklift as I'm sure he was doing his best but I could have though of several other ways of getting this boat out of the water. For example, tow it to where you could get it sideways, flip it and put it on a trailer. The lower Kenai has enough freshwater it could have been pretty salvagable, engines and all.

    Anyway, he ended up lifting from the bow which meant the nice honda twin fourstrokes were used as a fulcrum. I'd be a little concerned about the stress the transom was put under. Maybe it will just be an insurance claim. Glad I saw it because I've been thinking about getting one of these......I won't buy this one! Happy with my Bayrunner anyway......definitely spooky seeing a Whaler capsized like that, she didn't sink but I wouldn't have wanted to try to hang on for dear life on her hull in rough seas.

    I'm guessing it was an early Whaler Revenge Cuddy. Anyone else see the irony in almost dying after a coast guard boarding? Or how bout the "unsinkable whaler"- of course it didn't sink but that doesn't help too much when you are trapped underneath it. The last thing I found funny was when the article said the boat was name "The Boston Whaler"- unless these guys lack all originality I doubt they named their boat that!

    Just so glad no one got hurt. I actually lost power as well and was drifting down below the city dock.....I think it was my commercial fishing experience that had me ask my buddy to grab the oar and make sure we didn't hit one of the buoys.........honestly wasn't too worried about it anyway, but this shows I maybe should have been a little more concerned than a I was- you don't necessarily just roll off those things. Also, I think if I'd actually ran a boat in Bristol Bay rather than just crewed I would have been able to read if we were going to drift into the buoy of not with pretty good accuracy, as it was had the oar out for safety and as I said I think the experience gillnetting helped there. I like the anchor idea- good one. We definitely drifted past a few buoys before I got the kicker started.

    On another sad note, I just called my good friend who is dipping on the beach and the other night a gentleman had a heart attack, noone knew CPR so my buddy had to try it. I didn't hear with certainty but the way he said things makes me think the guy didn't make it. Tragic.

    On the lighter side, notice the dipnet in the photo......still doing it's job!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10

    Default Couple more photos

    Here are a couple more photos.......I wish I had one from when they were towing it over to the dock. he capsiazed boat looked smaller than it was and there was not way you could have told it was as tall as it was- looked like an open skiff actually.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Default

    Salvageable?
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

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