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Thread: .260 Rem for goats

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    Default .260 Rem for goats

    I have a choice between 2 rifles for goat season, a .300 SAUM and a .260 rem. The .260 is almost 2 pounds lighter but I am worried about the knockdown power when compared to the .300, which would you take? I am hoping to keep my shots under 200 yards.

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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    With a good premium bullet I think that the 260 would work well on goats. I used to own a model 7 in 260 and with good bullets I saw it shoot stem to stern through more than one good sized deer. If bears are a concern of course its probable a little on the light side.

    I like the 6.5s and wish I'd never gotten rid of that rifle, but take the one you are most confident in and use good bullets.

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    Mine is a model 7, stainless. (the .260) My .300 is a 700 stainless. I love that little .260, but im not sure on the availability of ammo where I am at. I already have rounds for the .300

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    Wink fire away

    Lets see.......2 pounds times 4 trillion steps.......= .260

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    Default take which ever

    makes you feel the most comfortable.

    I think most 260 bullets (that would be suitable for goat) would have greater sectional densities than the 30 cal bullets, resulting in better penetration (assumming "premimum" bullet construction).
    however, if you can't find suitable cartridges for the 260, the question is moot.
    Gary

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishinHank View Post
    Mine is a model 7, stainless. (the .260) My .300 is a 700 stainless. I love that little .260, but im not sure on the availability of ammo where I am at. I already have rounds for the .300
    A couple of years ago I built a 6.5 Swed that weighs a little under 7 pounds with scope, ammo & sling. Ballistics of the 260 & 6.5 Swed are nearly identical and I have absolute faith in it for goats, sheep, deer, & 'bou. Last season I collected a deer at 347 rangefinder yards with one shot with no problem; it took two or three steps and fell. My wife has carried this 6.5 during moose season with 140 XLCs and while she has not collected a moose, we've no doubt about its ability.

    The 300 SAUM is a fine cartridge, but I would not consider hauling that extra 2 pounds up & down every mtn between you and your goat if I had access to your 260. Of course ammo may be a problem, but if you can find 260 ammo this seems like a no brainer to me. As for ammo, I use the 140's exclusively in my 6.5 and would make that recommendation for you. In fact, I would recommend the 140 Nosler Partitions for goats. The Partition will give excellent expansion on these slab sided animals and it offers plenty of penetration from awkward angles to boot.

    Good luck and give us a report on which rifle you take and how things turn out.

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    sweet, I am pretty sold on taking my little .260 goat hunting. I was just worried it wouldn't have the knockdown power that the .300 would have, I really don't want to watch my goat run and jump off some impossible cliff because it didn't get whacked hard enough. I think I will take the .260, I will let everyone know how it (and me) did. I have never hunted goats before so this should be pretty good, I just hope to see some.

  8. #8

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    I would take the lighter gun. I own a 6.5 and love it. It shoots half inch groups and I have no trouble hitting milk jugs at 500 yards. I too am doing a goat hunt this fall and was a bit "concerned" about the 6.5's knock-down power; however, I have seen (video only) goats hit with big magnums that didn't drop like a stone. I think a good bullet and bullet placement (and goat placement on cliff faces, etc.) all factor into the equation. I shoot 140 grain Sierras (they group the best at long-range--my sheep was killed at 325 yards--he took a step and died). I also have shot NPs and Barnes X out of this gun and they did fine as well. I think if you pick your shot(s) carefully and keep shooting, you'll be fine IMO. Take what you feel confident with and practice (especially at steep angles) if you can. Hope this helps.

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