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Thread: .35 Caliber Help

  1. #1
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    Default .35 Caliber Help

    I am looking to get a new rifle. I want it to be a .35 caliber. The calibers I am considering are the .358 STA, .35-.300 Win Mag, and .35-.300 WSM (Sambar). I am currently weighing the cost options. I could build the .35-.300 Win Mag and .35-.300 WSM for a lower cost than building a .358 STA. I would be able to buy either a .300 Win Mag or .300 WSM and just have it rebarreled. Where I would have to have more work done to be able to build a .358 STA.

    So my question is I am looking for some people with experience in any of these three rounds and could give me some feedback and possibly some ballistics. I have been having a hard time finding ballistics for the .35-.300 Win Mag and .35-.300 WSM.

    Any feedback or advice is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!

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    I have no experience with any of these but I seem to recall someone on the forum having a 35 based on WSM.

    If you have not considered it you may also want to look at the 358 Norma Mag. It is similar to the 35-300wm, but has the advantage of being a factory offering at one time and loading data is more available.

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    A few other options that you may want to consider in the 35 caliber lineup are the 35 Whelen, and the 358 Nukalpiaq. For my 35 Whelen I had a 30-06 rebored to 35 Whelen work was done by Clearwater Reboring. For my 358 Norma I used a Interarms Mark X action that originally was a 7mm Remington Mag rifle, gunsmith work was done by Benchmark Barrels out of Arlington, Washington. For my 358 Nukalpiaq which is based on the 375 Ruger cartridge case I used a Montana Rifle Company action to start the project with and had Arctic Gun Works do the gunsmithing on it, McMillan did the stock work. Murphy was the cartridge designer and ballistician for the new cartridge. When he was finalizing the dimensions for the new cartridge, he graciously allowed me to be part of the discussions, which I did appreciate immensely. I recall he also had worked on designing a 358-300 WSM cartridge a few yrs ago too.
    If you use the search function on this website you can find threads on all of these cartridges and probably many more 35 caliber variants. Good luck and good shooting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaHuntin View Post
    I am looking to get a new rifle. I want it to be a .35 caliber. The calibers I am considering are the .358 STA, .35-.300 Win Mag, and .35-.300 WSM (Sambar). I am currently weighing the cost options. I could build the .35-.300 Win Mag and .35-.300 WSM for a lower cost than building a .358 STA. I would be able to buy either a .300 Win Mag or .300 WSM and just have it rebarreled. Where I would have to have more work done to be able to build a .358 STA.

    So my question is I am looking for some people with experience in any of these three rounds and could give me some feedback and possibly some ballistics. I have been having a hard time finding ballistics for the .35-.300 Win Mag and .35-.300 WSM.

    Any feedback or advice is greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
    I've not heard of a 35-300 WM, though I am confident someone has done it. With the short neck I would be reluctant to choose that case. It does not have enough neck for a 35 caliber bullet IMO. The 358 Norma would give you nearly identical ballistics with a longer neck and you can easily form brass from 338 WM cases. As for the 35 WSM (Sambar) I have a little experience with this cartridge and it is a good one, though not as good as the 358 Norma IMO. The Sambar will almost equal the velocity of the 358 Norma and it is easy to form and load. If you want a short action rifle it's an obvious choice, but a couple of ounces in a magnum .358 is of no concern to me.

    I am personally a 35 fan and use the 35's a great deal (35 Rem, 358 Win, 35 Whelen & 358 Norma) for my hunting. In my experience the 35 Whelen is as effective on moose as the 338 WM at distances up to 200-250 yards and it has considerably less recoil in rifles of similar weight. I prefer the .358 Norma to the .338 WM though I doubt I (or anyone else for that matter) can honestly tell the difference in the two cartridges in the field.

    I've considered building a 358 STA for years, but stepping up to the STA is a pretty good step up in recoil and I am not convinced that the effort to use the STA instead of say a 340 Weatherby (about the limit of my recoil tolerance) or 375 H&H is really worth it. I've never owned a STA, but I am very familiar with it and a 250 grain bulet at 3000 fps in a 25 inch barrel is no trick at all, easily besting the velocity of the 340. However the S.D. and B.C. of .338 bullets produce better long range ballistics from the 340. There are a few 275 grain .358 bullets that make the STA more interesting, but recoil is very stiff with these loads. I am not able to shoot these loads from the prone position, due to recoil, and so I would rarely be able to take advantage of the extra range they may give me. This is the primary reason that I have not built a STA and proably won't.

    Building a gun for any of these cartridges should not be a problem. As you stated a simple rebarrel should (it's not automatic) suffice for the 35-300 WM, 35 Sambar or the 358 Norma if you choose the proper parent cartridge for your action. The STA rifle with which I'm most familiar is a rebarreled M700 in 7mm Rem Mag. It was an ADL model and I don't think he even had to change the magazine box or follower. So the amount of work you'll need to have done will depend upon the individual action and all rebarrels do not turn out as simple as we first think & hope--I'm speaking from experience.

    I really like the 35's, but I like the 33's too. I suspect the difference in the two diameters in the field and on game is more theoretical than practical. However one real advantage that is not touted as much as it should be is the ability to use 158 & 180 pistol bullets (cheap) in the 35's for practice, varmints and even deer, if you choose the right bullet & velocity. This really cuts the price of loaded ammo. If you have not considered the 358 Norma then let me at least encourage you to take a good look at the Norma Magnum, I think it may be exactly what you are looking for.

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    THe 358 Norma is a great round, pretty much a 35-300win.

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    Default 358 Norma +1

    Already have a fine shootin 338 WM. Have a distant possibility of coming into another that used to be a fine shooter. It's lost some of it's accuracy, so IF I end up with it in the guncase.... It'll either become a 358 Norma or a 280 Ackley Improved....

    Just a little difference between them, but I've always wanted both....

    For my money, you can't/won't go wrong with either the Norma or the wheelen.. either way, it'll be fun

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    The 35 Whelen will do anything a .35 needs to do. A Winchester 70 action will hold five in the magazine and donor rifles in calibers such as 25-06, .270, 30-06 are super easy to find. Most 300 short mags are limited to 3 down. Cheap dies and cases and to top it off it is a non wildcat so it will be easy to selll down the road if you are so inclined.
    If you have an itch that needs to be scratched by doing more work then go with the other 35's you mentioned. If you want one of the best with components and reloading data galore stick with the tired and true Whelen.
    Tennessee

  8. #8

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    A .350 Remington Magnum in a Ruger M77 Mark II All- Weather makes a fine choice as well and can easily be converted to .350 WSM if so desired although with 225 gr TSX at 2700+ why bother?

    Mine sports a Burris FFII 2-7x35 and weighs in under 8lbs with scope.

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    Looking closely at my ruger allweather MK-II in 350RM, it seems they used the WSM action, as the feed rail is shaped for a big case and a rebated rim. In fact, I had to smooth a hard edge with a small file right at the rebated rim spot, otherwise my rifle wouldn't reliably feed the second -to-last round.

    As such, the ruger would be a no-brainer conversion to 358-300WSM. Check case dimensions - the 350RM case length might be longer, and you'd then have to set the barrel back a thread or two. Not too big a deal.

    So far, mine likes the 250 hornady round nose (sub-1.5" groups). It doesn't care for speer 250s or hornady 250 spire points, for whatever reason (2+ plus groups with lots of vertical string). For its intended use, the round nose will work fine, and should be a reliable game bullet.

  10. #10

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    I have a brand new Ruger 350 Rem mag thats still in the box and has been for the last 2 years. I bought this rifle with the intent of turning it into a 450 Marlin (since Ruger refuses to do it). However big brother called me and anounced that he is in the process of booking a two man brown bear hunt in Ak in a couple years. Since he has more jingle than me he has invited me along. So I ordered a couple hundred rounds of brass and bullets of 200,220 and 250 grain weights.

    If I didn't already have this rifle I would have done as Snowwolfe said and opted for a the necked up 06 version ( or maybe a 338-06) as the 350 mag with a 22" barrel basicly duplicates the Whelen. Big brother doesn't think the 350 mag or the Whelen are enough gun for big bears. I'm taking it anyway!

    As for a long action belted mag in 35 cal., the Norma mag is probably the best route. You want the neck to be at the bare minimum as long as the diameter of the bullet and thats gonna be tough to do with the 300 win mag case necked up.

    What do you plan to hunt with this new gun?

  11. #11
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    Looking closely at my ruger allweather MK-II in 350RM, it seems they used the WSM action
    ,

    That is because the 350 Remington Magnum was the original short magnum.

    While I loved my 358 Norma Mag. I am learning to like my 350 Rem-Mag M77MKII Ruger all weatehr after I made some modifications.
    Now it feeds nice and I shoot 225 grain slugs at 2,800 fps using RL-15.

    Of course my old 358 Norma Mag would shoot 250 grain Speer soft points at 2,800 + fps using IMR 4350.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    +1 for the 358 NM although I really like the 35 Whelen too.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  13. #13

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    I too think the 358 Norma is one of the most versatile rounds out there. Nothing against any of the other .35's because I like them all. But the Norma seems to strike the perfect balance of all of them. You can load it down to Whelen or even close to 358 Win levels. And yet it is giving up so very little to the STA that to me it's not worth going to the longer action and larger powder charge. I have had mine for a little over a year now and find myself not wanting to shoot any of my other guns much. And man what a job it does on game. I love it.

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