Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: coolers and ice

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    184

    Default coolers and ice

    I am looking for info from you all on how to go about keeping ice in coolers on long road trips.
    Anyone have ny tricks? Particular coolers that are better than others? I have a couple of the 40QT size 5-day Coleman style, but curious if any of you have other tricks.

    I have heard that salting the ice/water int he cooler helps it stay extra cold longer too.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    11

    Default

    I lay pieces of cardboard or newspaper inside on the top then duct tape the lid seams shut. We've kept things cold for about 6 days in 80 degree weather. I use the coleman style coolers also...

    Use block ice.

    Those big white marine coolers work well also, but they are pretty spendy.

  3. #3
    Member atvalaska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    camp-go-4-beer fbks
    Posts
    630

    Thumbs up

    freze your Cooler a couple days ahead of time. add the ice/frozen items the day u leave, tape it shut. Will last for days and days.........
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

  4. #4
    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    317

    Default block ice

    Definitely better, but rather than buying it I save up 1 gallon milk jugs, rinse em and throw em in the freezer, then when they do thaw you also have ice cold drinking water. The stainless steel coolers seem to work the best, but they are spendy.

  5. #5
    Member theultrarider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Soldotna
    Posts
    1,095

    Default

    x2 on the milk jugs. Been doing that since I was a kid 40 yrs ago. If you are not going to be in and out of your cooler for the 1st few days, use DRY ICE. It will last for many many days. Make sure to tape you cooler shut and things should stay froze solid for atleast a week if you do not open it. We used to leave home with two coolers as a kid on 2 week long fly outs. The cooler for the 1st week had frozen milk jugs, and the 2nd cooler did not get opened til the 1st was empty.

  6. #6

    Default

    Drain off the water often and I dont think salt will help.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Valley
    Posts
    59

    Default

    If anything adding salt would increase the melt rate of the ice since the reason road crews add salt to the roads in the lower 48 is to lower the freezing temperature of water (which means your ice starts to melt at say 25 degrees F instead of the normal melting point of ice at 32 degrees F).

  8. #8
    Member MRFISH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Foodsave/vacpack and freeze everything you can (even if you plan on using it early in the trip). You can always thaw it in water pretty quickly (esp if foodsaved) when you need it.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    184

    Default

    Regarding salt..

    The idea behind my question is this...keeping the cooler as cold as possible for as long as possible to keep the fish it contains as fresh as possible.

    When I have reds in brine, I have ice in the water, and the salt keeps the water SOOO COLD. I have seen a MythBusters episode that they were trying to find a way to make beer cold the fastest, and salty ice was a big winner.

    here is a website that I just rad and a quote-interesting read.
    http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc...1/gen01008.htm

    "Pure ice (no salt around) melts at a very specific temperature because at
    that temperature the kinetic energy of the molecules is great enough that
    they won't stay in the precise ice arrangement. When salt is added to the
    liquid phase, making it more difficult for water molecules to attach onto
    the solid ice, the water molecules that detach from the ice still need to
    pick up energy. They get this energy from their surroundings, which are the
    rest of the liquid and solid water. In other words, as the water molecules
    leave the ice and go into the water, they absorb energy from the ice and
    water, making it colder."

    I think I have the Science Fair project for the kids figured out

  10. #10

    Default Get an "extreme" cooler

    They definately keep things colder longer than a normal cooler. Keep the lid down tight and should last for a few days. Block ice will last longer for sure.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    257

    Default keepin coolers cold...

    Freeze all you can.
    Freeze the cooler too.
    Pack it full, add filler if needed. wadded up news paper is light and works well.
    Block ice/milk jugs instead of cubes
    Seal it shut with duct tape
    Don't open it until you have to.

    I use a couple of smaller 40qt coolers for long hauls rather than 1 big one. Plan things right while you pack so you only open one until it's empty, then break the seal on the other.

    Ice + salt = bad
    Rock Salt + dry ice = good.... Just don't open the cooler until you're ready to use it. Works well for the "open later" cooler.

    White coolers will buy you a day maybe 2 over another color. Sometimes this is overlooked. Metal coolers are expensive and heavy, but they are better than plastic.

  12. #12
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    230

    Lightbulb White cooler and big blocks

    I agree with the white cooler idea also. I use the cheap rubbermaid dish tubs to make my own blocks. I can put 3 of those big blocks in my white igloo cooler strapped to the swim deck of the boat and be good getting in and out of it a few times a day, plus throwing the fish and shrimp catch in when needed.
    I think the key is extra large blocks of ice. I can stay out on the boat for close to a week and have plenty of cold space with this method. And I am always throwing out ice chunks when I get home.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    fairbanks alaska
    Posts
    207

    Default lucked out

    on occasion, going from fbks to valdez and back, i've picked up ice out of summit lake for the price of free. so don't drive by it.
    all previous advice is good to avoid the $$$ bags along the hwy.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    The Valley
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FairbanksBowHunter View Post
    Regarding salt..

    The idea behind my question is this...keeping the cooler as cold as possible for as long as possible to keep the fish it contains as fresh as possible.

    When I have reds in brine, I have ice in the water, and the salt keeps the water SOOO COLD. I have seen a MythBusters episode that they were trying to find a way to make beer cold the fastest, and salty ice was a big winner.

    here is a website that I just rad and a quote-interesting read.
    http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasc...1/gen01008.htm

    "Pure ice (no salt around) melts at a very specific temperature because at
    that temperature the kinetic energy of the molecules is great enough that
    they won't stay in the precise ice arrangement. When salt is added to the
    liquid phase, making it more difficult for water molecules to attach onto
    the solid ice, the water molecules that detach from the ice still need to
    pick up energy. They get this energy from their surroundings, which are the
    rest of the liquid and solid water. In other words, as the water molecules
    leave the ice and go into the water, they absorb energy from the ice and
    water, making it colder."

    I think I have the Science Fair project for the kids figured out
    I think your article proves my point. The question was how to get the ice to last the longest, and adding salt will simply decrease the temperature at which water remains in a solid form (ice). Adding salt ONLY affects the liquid water since salt cannot dissolve into Ice. It reduces the temperature of the LIQUID H20 disrupting the equilibrium between the ice and water phases of the H20 in question. In order for the solution to regain equilibrium the ice must melt into LIQUID H20 so the salt does decrease the temperature but it also increases the rate of melting of the SOLID phase H20. Every time you open the cooler you lose cold air and have to re-cool the inside down to say 28 degrees for the sake of numbers instead of 32 degrees. That logically takes more energy to do and the only place you get energy from ICE is by melting it. The SOLID phase H20 is what keeps the cooler cold, once you're out of SOLID phase it's only a matter of time until your meat is rotten

    The presence of the salt lowers the "chemical potential" of the water. But
    the "chemical potential" of the ice remains the same. If we were to hold the
    temperature of the ice and salt solution at 0 C., the ice would all melt
    because it has a higher "chemical potential" than the salt solution.
    Remember I said that the addition of salt reduces the "chemical potential"
    of the liquid water. If the pure ice is to remain in equilibrium with the
    salt solution, it must lose some of its "chemical potential". Since pressure
    has no effect (you have to trust me on that), and no salt can dissolve in
    the solid ice, the only way for the ice to lose "chemical potential" is for
    the temperature to be lowered. Remember, I said that "chemical potential"
    increases with increasing temperature. And that is what happens. The
    temperature of the ice = salt solution decreases until the "chemical
    potential" of the ice and NOW the salt solution become equal.

  15. #15
    Member MRFISH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by quakinator View Post
    I think your article proves my point. The question was how to get the ice to last the longest, and adding salt will simply decrease the temperature at which water remains in a solid form (ice). Adding salt ONLY affects the liquid water since salt cannot dissolve into Ice. It reduces the temperature of the LIQUID H20 disrupting the equilibrium between the ice and water phases of the H20 in question. In order for the solution to regain equilibrium the ice must melt into LIQUID H20 so the salt does decrease the temperature but it also increases the rate of melting of the SOLID phase H20. Every time you open the cooler you lose cold air and have to re-cool the inside down to say 28 degrees for the sake of numbers instead of 32 degrees. That logically takes more energy to do and the only place you get energy from ICE is by melting it. The SOLID phase H20 is what keeps the cooler cold, once you're out of SOLID phase it's only a matter of time until your meat is rotten
    I don't like salt on my margarita glass, either.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    802

    Default No Peeking!

    That's my advice to anyone who is "on the harvest"...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


  17. #17

    Default Portage Glacier Ice

    I have stopped at Portage and got Free Block ice for years, lasts a lot longer. I also freeze water in square juice jugs over milk ones they lay nice and flat. And for all my vaccum packed meals I have a small cooler in the big one specialy for them.
    And yup no peeking

  18. #18
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Really good quality coolers eliminate the need for tape, and need less ice to stay cold. But they cost a lot more than a normal cooler, however last cooler you ever have to buy.

    www.yeticoolers.com

  19. #19

    Thumbs up 2 liter bottles

    I freeze up 2 liter soda bottles when I am on a long float or hunting trip. The added bonus is that I have extra water that I don't have to pack or store giving me more room for gear on the raft or ATV. Just make sure that you freeze the bottles upright. I am also going to test some reusable dry ice sheets that looks like it should be a great addition to keeping things cold. The product is called Techni-ice. Their web site is www.techniice.com. Tight lines.

  20. #20

    Default

    I make ice substitute from a garden product...polymer crystals...used to retain water in potted plants. They suck up water and each crystal's size increases by a factor of at least twenty when hydrated. Place in zip lock freezer bags and freeze. I basically carpet the bottom of the cooler with them. When you start pitching fish in the coolers you can stand them vertically or intersperse them in the layers of fish. It's been at least 5 years since I made my last batch. If a bag gets torn I just let it thaw and empty into a new bag and refreeze. Have had it last up to a week in "nothing special" coolers. No clue as to why it lasts so much longer than plain ice.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •