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Thread: older boat with problems

  1. #1
    Member anticipation's Avatar
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    Default older boat with problems

    hi a while back i bought a boat for ocean going it is a 21 ft sportcraft imperial it looked real nice for the price i paid but i think i probly got ripped off after doing much more research i kinda bought it on impulse

    it is an older boat early 70's i think fiberglass, and the motar is a 115 hp evinrude the motor i dont blelieve works but i planned on replacing it anyhow it came with a trailor, and i paid $2000 for it.

    i had a friend who knows alot more about them look at it and he said that the damage on the inside by the motor mount where the fiberglass is deteriorated and the inside wood is exposed is actually a very serious problem and the wood is probably rotten which means it is very costly to fix is there someone who knows about this stuff or maybe specializes in repairing this type of boat?

    im starting to think if its gonna cost me 15k to buy a new motor and fix the boat maybe i should just ****can it and buy an aluminum boat with a working motor all ready.

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Fiberglass work isn't that hard to do if you are reasonably handy. It's hard to say how involved the work will be, but many people replace rotted out transoms and related glass work. I'm sure you could find some good books on the subject.

    In general those old boats that look like great deals become money and time pits. But if you have the tools and skills, you can do a pretty thorough repair, refit and re-power over the winter and be on the water for less than what a newer boat would cost.

    I'd suggest in addition to looking at the hull and engine, to completely replace the electrical system, put all new hoses, filters and gaskets in the fuel system, and the trailer will need a thorough once over of the axles, springs, tires and wiring/lights.

    I'm thinking you could get all of that done within your 15k estimate. A similar sized newer aluminum boat will easily run double that.

  3. #3
    Member anticipation's Avatar
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    well doesnt have to be that new and id settle for a 16-17 foot boat but yes i see what you mean its just i dont have alot of spare time to do the work myself, which is why im sorta halfway looking for someone who i can pay to do this work

  4. #4
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    I with Paul 100%. BTW, for that price, you didn't get ripped off ...just deceived maybe. For a handyman type of guy with a little time, the boat could be fixed up reasonably well without too much into it. That said, there are probably other boats with similar total prices (the cost of your boat plus repairs) that are already serviceable as they are. Someone I know bought an older GlasPly that wasn't particularly pretty to look at, but it is all solid and works fine. I think he paid around $4k for it and he's able to go far offshore with it. The downside for you is that you now have a decision to make ...pay someone else to fix it and likely come out at a higher price than the finished boat is worth, or find the time to do it yourself and save money, or sell it as-is ...which puts some other guy into your shoes when it comes to buying it. I'd probably do that, but be sure to be honest about it and let some pumped-up guy that's hot to get a boat decide he can do the repairs on his own ...someone with more time than you. There are folks out there ready and willing to take on these types of projects, so don't give up hope on it. The world keeps turning. You'll be on the water soon if you focus and go through the steps involved.

    Brian

  5. #5
    Member ksbha4's Avatar
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    Default Replacing the transom

    I'm in the same boat as you in regards to a rotted transom. My skiff is a bit smaller (15 ft) but the wood is rotted out. You Tube has some GREAT "how to" videos that show you how to fiberglass. Google Fiberglassics and there is information on there on how to replace transoms as well.
    Ask not what your government can do for you. Ask how your government can go away and get out of your life

  6. #6
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    Default Git Rot-type of repair

    I had the same problem in part of my transom. I got some of the resin at Spenards that is used to repair rot in logs for log homes. It is similar to git rot. I drilled 1/4" holes every 1-1/2" in a square grid on the inside of the transom then used a large syringe to inject the wood in my transom full of resin (2 quarts for a big boat). The existing semi-rotted wood is soaked in resin and becomes hard as a rock that way. It took a couple coats/injections then I fiberglassed over all the holes sanded and painted the inside of the transom. That transom is rock solid and it took only a few nights after work to do. It is a good solid fix that won't cost an arm, leg, or privates. It isn't rocket science and can be done in evenings in about a week. Make sure the wood isn't too wet inside the transom though. You may need to drill the holes and let it dry for a bit if it is. Hope that helps.

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