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Thread: Preserving Pinks??

  1. #1

    Default Preserving Pinks??

    Is it possible to freeze them??

    I have heard yes and no and read yes and no.

    I have a friend who would like to try some but I don't want to pack them and pay to have them frozen if they are going to come out bad.

    Thanks
    Cody

  2. #2
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    Cody, check out this link http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=59148
    Some people have better luck than others. "Pretty sure it all depends on how the fish are taken care of after caught (bled especially)". Quote from bigjim

  3. #3
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    They need to be fresh ocean fish to freeze well, but if they are ocean bright then they will freeze fine.

  4. #4

    Default Nice

    Definitely wouldn't keep any fish unless it was bright and always bleed my fish so I think I will keep a couple.

    Thanks
    Cody

  5. #5

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    I didn't freeze any of the pinks I caught - cooked one of them up for dinner that night (can never go wrong with any bright fresh salmon). The other two were cut up and smoked - jerky style. Saved some - vacuum sealed the others and figure they should hold up for quite a while. Of the people that have tried them so far... just about everyone has said "That's from a pink?"

  6. #6
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    I kept a shiny pink from Bird Creek today and it tasted pretty good on the grill with some soy sauce and cajun spice on it. I'm going to test how well they freeze tomorrow.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    We had quite a few pinks vacuum-packed and frozen from our trip last year. They were caught in saltwater and were chrome bright. They held up just fine. One or two were mushy but most were firm. They seemed to weather the freezer as well as the chum and coho we brought back as well.

  8. #8
    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Default You can freeze then and smoke them, but...

    Quote Originally Posted by TightLinesHI View Post
    We had quite a few pinks vacuum-packed and frozen from our trip last year. They were caught in saltwater and were chrome bright. They held up just fine. One or two were mushy but most were firm. They seemed to weather the freezer as well as the chum and coho we brought back as well.
    Yuk, I think fresh pink and chum are good to eat but they are just like dollies and do not perserve well... Canning the best option or simply let them swim away.

  9. #9
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default it is all a matter of perspective...

    pinks are okay if you don't have much to compare them to. kings and silvers are great frozen, reds too but i don't think they hold up as well at about month 6 or 7... chums and pinks make great cured roe, but the meat i give to the dogs .
    sorta like if you have access to fresh mahi, ahi and ono... why would you bother with frozen?
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  10. #10

    Default Is It Worth It?

    Just read this thread about preserving pinks and I see that a couple of you bleed your pink salmon. Is it really worth it? Does bleeding the fish really make a difference? I can see bleeding something like a halibut - you don't want one of those beasts aboard your boat alive! But a pink salmon?

    I'll be shore fishing tomorrow and I may try it just for grins and see if it makes a difference.

  11. #11
    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FbksFishinFool View Post
    Just read this thread about preserving pinks and I see that a couple of you bleed your pink salmon. Is it really worth it? Does bleeding the fish really make a difference? I can see bleeding something like a halibut - you don't want one of those beasts aboard your boat alive! But a pink salmon?

    I'll be shore fishing tomorrow and I may try it just for grins and see if it makes a difference.

    huh....you bleed the fish to preserve the meat better, not to kill the fish. Here is a good thread on what happends when you bleed your fish, there some good posts on here:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=59393

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Bleeding makes all the difference, regardless of make & model.
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    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    can them or grill them right away
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  14. #14
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FbksFishinFool View Post
    Just read this thread about preserving pinks and I see that a couple of you bleed your pink salmon. Is it really worth it? Does bleeding the fish really make a difference?
    Bleeding makes ALL of the difference when it comes to meat quality. Most salmon that tastes "fishy" was either not bled or not kept cool. Those two things matter more than anything else when it comes to quality salmon.

  15. #15

    Default After bleeding, gutting etc....

    ... I brine mine for 4 hours, smoke them for about the same time and then can them. We've tried eating them just smoked but the meat was too soft, and after canning it was just right.

  16. #16

    Default Personally...

    I've caught/kept 6 pinks from Hope one year, they were fine 6 months later (bled them at the river, vac packed). I also got quite a few pinks that were commercially caught (head/gutted models) that were also about 4-5 months old and they came out great, both ways: smoked/grilled.
    As far as bleeding fish; always do it! Also don't beat them senseless when you get 'em. One whack on the head only; put on stringer, then pop a gill (both sides of head), and for extra measure, plunge your fillet knife in the throat/soft area directly behind the gills; blood really pours out of there. Kinda anal I know, but when we clean these fish, even within the hour, there is virtually no blood left in their system. Also, I see so many folks just toss their fish in a bin or cooler from outside the boat; no way. Bruises the meat. Treat any fish with respect when it comes to care and it will be that much better.
    Jim
    Hey Dave, amen to all the Hawaiian fish! Alaska is Great, man!

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