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Thread: Too many Clothes?

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default Too many Clothes?

    I'm one of those retired jarheads that likes to have things for every possible situation. How many of you find yourself taking too many clothes? I'm having trouble trying to decide if I should take a heavy weight hunting outfit as well on my moose hunt. I know that it's during the time where weather can be 50 degrees or drop to 15 degrees. What do you like for outer wear for a moose hunt? Please don't tell me sitka, a 1000.00 for a hunting outfit is just plain stupid!!!

  2. #2
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default My Opinion

    I usually take clothes that I don't wear because it's too warm. However, just a few days of being too cold might cure me of taking too few. TAKE the heavyweight undies - you never know.

    I wish I could find some good, cheap outerwear. I have an original Rivers West raingear that is pretty heavy (especially when wet) and warm. It's what I usually wear on early Alaska hunts (it will be with me on the Chicken Ridge in August 2009). It's tough to be TOO dry or, at my age, TOO warm.

    I'll be reading this to see what others wear. BTW, Sitka makes GOOD gear - and, YES, it is expensive.

    Phil

  3. #3

    Default

    Layers are the best way to stay warm and, yes, they add up, but also save from being bulky.

    So I take multiple layers of quality synthetic shirts and 2 layers of long underwear for the legs, a fleece vest and then my hydro-fleece is my outer wear. A pair of wool pants. Liner socks and wool socks and a neck gaiter for traveling in the boat and of course a warm knit hat, knit glove liners, leather gloves and insulated gloves.

    Been using that system for years and have not found a reason to change it.

  4. #4

    Default unclear what type of moose hunting.

    You have many different scenarios. You could be on a high country moosehunt where you are riding horses with a pack train or you could be hunting from a boat. The former would require clothing more similar to sheep hunting the latter more similar to duck hunting.

    Baselayer- This is important in either situation. Get the best long underwear that fits you. These new wool type long underwear from Icebreaker or Ibexwear are great and they aren't scratchy.

    Midlayer-Cabela's sells worstelon plaid shirts again. They are really good for either type of hunting. You could also wear woolrich, pendleton or Filson. Wool pants of either woolrich or Swedish military surplus are great.

    Outerlayer- You can go with the duck jackets found in Cabelas. Those Browning hydrophobic jackets are good. You can also just get some Helly Hanson rain gear.

    Extras- A good wool or down vest is nice for either early or late hunting. A good musher's type hat or a beaver hat is really nice in either situation.

    These are just some ideas.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  5. #5

    Default Layers

    Tom, you can do without the $300 - 1000 jackets and other similar expensive gear by layering, as Thomas mentioned above. I've probably spent the folloiwing amounts on my hunting clothes:

    Synthetic long underwear - $10 - 20 per item, can do with 1 pair lightweight and 1 pair midweight of pants and shirts

    Pants/shirt - can be fleece, wool, or similar synthetic product, I spent about $20 - 30 per item at Sierra Trading post or other discount online stores

    Fleece vest - with a windshear lining if possible, cost about $25 - 40

    Coat - I kept the cost down by getting a midweight fleece coat (about $50 - 60) and then using a liner/inner layer from another cheap coat (also about $50 - 60) to put over my vest and under the coat if it's really chilly or windy.

    This setup kept me warm on a hunt in late September where our drinking water and lemonade was getting a layer of ice every night. It should be a little warmer for you on your lake hunt, so you should be fine! You could also throw your raingear over the whole thing for one more layer if needed, but i was never cold enough to do that.

    Been on 5 Alaska hunts in the past 7 years, my most expensive piece of clothing cost about $50, and I've never been in a situation where I needed more clothes than I brought.

  6. #6
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    Default insulator jacket

    One of the best pieces of gear I have ever bought is the Cabella's insulator jacket. It is very warm, and if you are ever doing some backpack hunting, it has a stuff sack and packs up to little space or weight.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...233&hasJS=true
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  7. #7
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default good input

    I appreciate all of the responses so far. I have all of the right layering gear. Light and mid weight long johns, synthetic t-shirts, sporthill and mammut pants, mid and heavy woolrich shirts, helly hensen rain gear, vest, etc. It's just deciding on that final outer layer.

  8. #8

    Default

    +1. These things rock. Lightweight (realtively at about 16 oz) pack up small and are uber warm. Can't say enough about them. Probably bought or helped others buy over 10 of these coats. Great product for the money IMO.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carnivore View Post
    One of the best pieces of gear I have ever bought is the Cabella's insulator jacket. It is very warm, and if you are ever doing some backpack hunting, it has a stuff sack and packs up to little space or weight.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...233&hasJS=true

  9. #9
    Member walk-in's Avatar
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    Default wool and polypro

    I typically wear wool pants, a wool shirt, wool socks, and polypro long johns. I'm also never without my Filson packer hat, but I also have a wool stocking cap in the back pocket of my coat. If I get too hot, I remove the long johns. If I get too cold, I add an old surplus French Gore-tex jacket that I got for about $15 from Major Surplus. For boots, I like Danner's Fort Lewis boots (uninsulated) and their Canadians (insulated). Whichever ones I take, I also take Xtra-Tuffs just in case. Of course, that is assuming I have my 4 wheeler or we're hunting from a base camp. For walk-in hunts, 1 pair of boots has to do it.
    I also have my pack stove with me. When you're cold, there is nothing like hot food and drink.
    We are right to take alarm at the first experiment upon our liberties.
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  10. #10

    Default Fleece

    One more note about fleece, for anyone who is trying it for the first time...it's GREAT for drying out quickly and shedding water! But, that also means that it tends to suck the moisture right out of you...so make sure to drink plenty of liquids in the field or you will get dehydrated.

  11. #11
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default "non-dehydrating fleece"

    Fleece is great and does dry out quickly - primarily because is can only adsorb water not absorb water - regardless it WILL NOT DEHYDRATE you. There is no anatomic, physiologic, or pharmacologic rational for this. It is important to stay well hydrated - an individual will be at least 10% dehydrated before the sensation of thirst appears. Have a good hunt.

  12. #12
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    +1. These things rock. Lightweight (realtively at about 16 oz) pack up small and are uber warm. Can't say enough about them. Probably bought or helped others buy over 10 of these coats. Great product for the money IMO.
    +2! After hiking and sweating for hours, once you cool off, its nice to throw one of these on...lightweight and small...

  13. #13
    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Carnivore View Post
    One of the best pieces of gear I have ever bought is the Cabella's insulator jacket. It is very warm, and if you are ever doing some backpack hunting, it has a stuff sack and packs up to little space or weight.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...233&hasJS=true
    How compressable are these?

  14. #14
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    I'm one of those retired jarheads that likes to have things for every possible situation. How many of you find yourself taking too many clothes? I'm having trouble trying to decide if I should take a heavy weight hunting outfit as well on my moose hunt. I know that it's during the time where weather can be 50 degrees or drop to 15 degrees. What do you like for outer wear for a moose hunt? Please don't tell me sitka, a 1000.00 for a hunting outfit is just plain stupid!!!
    Nothing wrong with being prepared. Depending on where you hunt, the bottom could drop out of the thermometer.

    I take clothes for cold and clothes for wet and an extra set if I happen to get wet.

    I like Carhartts if it's warmer and go to wool if it gets cooler. Dressing in layers should prepare you for about anything.
    Now what ?

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Antleridge View Post
    How compressable are these?
    About the size of a 1 liter nalgene water bottle.

  16. #16
    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    About the size of a 1 liter nalgene water bottle.
    Thanks; I'll have to try one.

  17. #17
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Default

    Barney's Super Cub or Brooks Range Jackets and the pants. There are rediculously light, compactable, warm, and will cut the total gear you'll need.

    Brett

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