Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Leupold VXIII 1.5-5

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    31

    Default Leupold VXIII 1.5-5

    Does anyone have any experience with this scope. I'm looking at this one with the illuminated reticle. I will be putting it on a Browning Auto 338 and its primary yse will be for bear. Any thoughts/experience with this particular scope?

    Charlie

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    I have one on my .375. I think it's the best choice for a gun that you'll carry in brusy bear country because you can aquire a close target quickly at the 1.5 magnification. Out in the open I dial it up. It's a great scope. I haven't found anything better for that rifle.

  3. #3

    Default

    It's about my favorite scope, though I haven't tried the illuminated reticle. After years of use, I'm convinced that it's faster than open sights when the chips are down.

    I've got one on a 375, a 458, a heavy wildcat built on a Marlin lever, and on an ultralight 54 cal inline muzzleloader. That latter kicks quite a bit more than the 458. The same scope lived for a couple of years on a 460 Wby.

    The scope's as tough as can be, plus the eye relief is long enough for the heavy recoilers.

    There's one issue to be aware of: A friend wanted to shoot my 375 and consistently hit about 4 feet high at 100 yards. I thought he was flinching till we figured out that at 1.5x you can see the front sight, and he was looking through the scope and then sighting off the front sight. I'd definitely remove the front sight from any rifle that I mounted this scope on, especially one that is going to be used in emergencies. I have since done so on my 375, simply because I worry that I might fall back on old habits and try to use the front sight under stress.

  4. #4
    Member svehunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Stockholm,Sweden
    Posts
    422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    I have one on my .375. I think it's the best choice for a gun that you'll carry in brusy bear country because you can aquire a close target quickly at the 1.5 magnification. Out in the open I dial it up. It's a great scope. I haven't found anything better for that rifle.
    Could not agree more,i have the exact same scope on my 375 and its deadly bear medicine...

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    I have one only it has the #4 German crosshair. Take a look at it before you purchase one with the standard duplex.
    Great scope.

  6. #6

    Default The 1.5x5

    I used a that scope on a .338 Win. Mag. for 12 years. I used to think it was the best and still like it. My favorite scope is the Leupold 2.5 x 8 by 36 mm. It is also very fast. Leupold's 1.75 x 6 by 32 mm is also a very good scope and will transmit more light then the 1.5 x 5 by 20 mm. A center post cross hair in one is a great set up for a .375. Leupold and a couple of very good custom rifle smiths claim the 1.75 x 6 is the toughest variable powered scope they make. It is very fast. I have the 1.5 x 5 by 20 mm on my .375 and it has a German #4 in it. I have not used it on anything because I always grab my .338. I am not a big fan of batteries in scopes but others are. That scope will still work if the battery fails. Hope you get a BIG ONE !

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Valley trash.....and proud of it.
    Posts
    813

    Default

    I also agree on the 1.5x5. I've had one for years. its been on a 458Lott, a 375 and numerous 338's and now its on my 35whelan. I'm planning on having either a 458winny or a 416taylor built next spring and I'm gonna pick up another one for it.

    Good scope at a reasonable price and if you do kill it, send it back for repairs/replacement. cant argue with that.

  8. #8

    Default Leupold 1.5X5X20

    It has many very desireable features as noted in earlier posts.I hunted Africa with one on a 375.

    As mentioned, when set much below 4 power, the barrel looms in the image.This can be disconcerting and is hard to ignore.

    And with a 20MM objective, it is very marginal under low light.

    Still, for close quarters work, it brings a lot of options to the table.

    FWIW, I've settled on a Leupold 6X42 for my 375.No need to futz with a power setting...and in very low light, it really shines.Also less complication internally to (possibly) take a dump at the wrong time.

    But I'll be the first to admit I haven't had to dig brownies out of thick stuff yet.JMHO.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bethel, Cantwell, Fort Yukon, Skagway, Chevak and Point Hope
    Posts
    967

    Default

    I have 2 of each 1.5X5X20. 2 with the Circle Dot Reticle and 2 with the German #4. This is the second Leupold that I have had with the Circle Dot Reticle and I really like them. I've got a 1X3X14 Mk4 mounted on my Bushmaster for fox hunting. The one's with the Illuminated Reticle have a 30MM tube so you will have to take that into consideration if you order one. The down side too the Illuminated Reticles is if you forget to turn them off when not in use. Battery life is about 40-50 hours.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    31

    Default

    Sounds like everyone has good things to say about it but maybe the 2.5 x 8 x 36 might be a better option. Although you loose the illuminated reticle you gain more light with the bigger objective. With what limited bear experience I have it usually seems to stretch the light conditions and maybe the bigger objective is more important than the lighted reticle.

    Charlie

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but the basic rule of thumb is the objective lens should equal the max magnification x4. My 1.5x5x20 has never had a low-light problem. In fact it may be the best scope I have for semi-darkness. Bigger magnification scopes are worse in low light. At least that's how I see it.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    The pupil in our eye will rarely expand beyond 5mm even in total darkness. The general rule when trying to determine the "light gathering" ability of the scope or binocular is to divide the magnification of the scope setting being used into the size of the objective. Then hopefully this number will be a 4 or 5 which is, as I said, normally the most the eye can take advantage of.
    Lets take the 5x setting from the 1.5 x5. Divide 5 into the 20mm tube and you end up with 4. Not bad, and I would be very happy with it.
    Try taking a 2.5 x 8 with a 32mm objective. 8 into 32 gives you 4 again.
    Of course using the lower powers of any scope will give you a larger number number.
    I also hesitate to use the term "light gathering" as light isnt gathered but transmitted.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •