Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Economical Fuel Flow Meters

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    260

    Default Economical Fuel Flow Meters

    I have done a lot of research about the uses and prices on fuel flow meters and thought everyone might benefit from my findings.
    I have a Standard Horizon meter installed on my single engine boat that works great. Below is some of the suppliers of other units that work very well. I know now that I would be lost without the flow meter. I has paid for it's self many times over.

    http://www.shipstore.com/SS/HTML/NST/NSTNS004551.html

    http://www.jandhproducts.com/_e/loc/...ENGINE_KIT.htm
    How stupid is it to be wasting tons of salmon and halibut as bycatch in the Bering Sea and then have the coastal villages hollaring they have no food? It's got to stop!

  2. #2
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    When you say the Northstar has paid for itself many times over, may I presume you're talking about the fuel savings you've projected that you've made because you've trimmed out your boat while running to save fuel? Or, is there more to the equation?

    I don't have one installed on my boat yet, but I sure am thinking about doing so soon.....even though it hasn't been much time since I spent all the money buying it and setting it up.

    Even though the sales adds don't say so, I'm sure the Northstar also comes with the in-line sensor too, right?

    Thanks for the post.

  3. #3
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HuntKodiak View Post
    When you say the Northstar has paid for itself many times over, may I presume you're talking about the fuel savings you've projected that you've made because you've trimmed out your boat while running to save fuel? Or, is there more to the equation?
    It's both trim and trottle setting. I have the smartgauge package with my Merc and a GPS.

    It's harder w/o a GPS, but you get up on step and want to run about 3-5 mph above the minimum speed that will keep you on step.

    With a GPS you look at your speed (mph) divided by your flowrate (gph) which gives you your MPG. Of course currents will throw a small wrench into the equation.

    I get the same MPG if I run 6-7 mph or 26-27 mph, but you know which I'd rather run weather permitting . . .

  4. #4
    Member propgrinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    BearFlanks
    Posts
    66

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    I get the same MPG if I run 6-7 mph or 26-27 mph, but you know which I'd rather run weather permitting . . .
    You get the same mpg at 6-7 mph as you do 26-27 mph? Tell me exactly how you do that...

  5. #5
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by propgrinder View Post
    You get the same mpg at 6-7 mph as you do 26-27 mph? Tell me exactly how you do that...
    Under slow speed, you act as a displacement hull, consuming 3.0-3.5 gph.

    Under high speed, you act as a planing hull, consuming 13.0-13.5 gph. I'm running 2-cycle BTW.

    Do the math - both are 2 mpg.

  6. #6
    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,244

    Default

    I would have to agree here, it has paid for itself in fuel savings. I also run a 2 stroke that will consume almost 18gph at wot or 7ish if I run conservatively. Before installing the unit I had no clue how much fuel I was previously using. That said I now pay attention to it and feel it was a worthy investment especially with todays fuel prices.

    On another note who owns a boat that has an accurate fuel gauge? Most of them will fluctuate depending on if your on step, in rough water, the boat isn't loaded evenly etc. This is a much more accurate way to keep tabs on how much you've used and how much is left. Worth every dime in my opinion.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    260

    Default Dollars Saved On Fuel

    Prior to the flow meter I had no idea where the most economical speed range was for my boat, being a two stroke - it will burn a wide range of GPH based on RPM's. The meter will tell you how much per hr, how much total consumed and if set properly - it will give you a low fuel alarm. You can also not reset it each time and it will tell you at the end of the year how much fuel you burned for the season. Of course that figure might give some people a heart attack?
    It's a great instrument that's easy to install, and really save you a lot of fuel money over time.
    By the way the pic in the advertisment doesn't show the proper buttons
    on the unit.

    Attached is the reference for the one I actually have installed

    http://www.standardhorizon.com/index...7&DivisionID=3
    How stupid is it to be wasting tons of salmon and halibut as bycatch in the Bering Sea and then have the coastal villages hollaring they have no food? It's got to stop!

  8. #8
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    190

    Default

    I've got the Honda speedometer. It displays GPH, MPG, speed, GPH and MPG for either motor or both motors. It also shows a resettable odometer and a resettable total gallons used which is much more accurate than my regular fuel Gauge.

    With my old prop that had a 17 pitch I got 2.8 MPG at best trim and RPM about 25 to 27 MPH. I could pull her back to 10 MPH while site seeing or in rough weather and get 4 MPG!

    My new 19 pitch prop was a mistake. Really hurt my mileage and top end. It's getting changed back out right now.

  9. #9
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    um... Wasilla...
    Posts
    826

    Default

    I'm a big advocate of fuel flow meters. I know tying a Navman unit into the chartplotter has definitely paid for itself in fuel savings. With my older 2-stroke, a few hundred RPM or a few degrees of trim can be the difference between 3.5 MPG and 2.5 MPG.
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  10. #10

    Default Which Honda Meter?

    Hey Sockeye,

    WHich combo Honda meter do you have on your boat?

    Nozzlehog

  11. #11
    Member GOT TOYS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    118

    Default Navman

    I too use the inexpensive flow meter referenced above on my 225 Honda. It is invaluable, and yes I would say has paid for itself. The only way to go when sizing props. Also, I wouldn't have a clue how much fuel I had on board without it. It is accurate within 1 gallon at 75 gallons burned. It works even when idling, so may still be pretty accurate for those that troll a lot.
    Kingfisher 2525. 225, 20, and 2hp Hondas.

  12. #12
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    559

    Default

    I have had one of these for 2 years now and swear by it. it is accurate within 1 gallon on every trip. I never look at my old guage as it is usless. I log every trip and have tested at different RPM, GPG comparision to determine my best fuel consupmtion for my mimle per gallon ratio. Best investment one can make. They make fancier units that will tell you more, but this is the best bang for the buck
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

  13. #13
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Another advocate of the fuel flow meter. To me it's much more than a way to improve mileage, it gives me an accurate fuel level and thus an accurate way to gauge your range.

    I don't know if the gauge has saved me much in fuel, but it has certainly given me the piece of mind to be able to gauge how much fuel to carry for long trips, and not come anywhere close to running out.

  14. #14

    Default

    I've been using the flo-scan analog meter for a couple of years and they are worth every penny. Especially when running 4 days in PWS or 1100 miles on the Yukon moose hunting. Getting it proped right and trim and throttle set can save quite a bit of fuel. This year I bought a bigger yamaha and the fuel meter with it ,so I took out the flo-scan meter and sending unit.
    If any one is interested in buying it,pm me .

  15. #15
    New member Sockeye Salm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    190

    Default

    I don't have the part # or model # of my Honda meter handy. Call Ron's Honda at 800-478-5235. Talk to Travis or Terry. Tell them John, the guy with the 759 Stabi sent you.

  16. #16

    Default

    Anyone know of a cheap (less than $200) fuel flow meter that can display MPG using NMEA 0183 output from my chartplotter?

    The Northstar f310 looks like it will do the job, but costs $400+

  17. #17
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    The lowrance lmf 400 is one of the cheapest units, about $200, but it's NMEA 2000, not 183. And when I looked into it, there was no way to communicate between the two busses. Since my gps is 183 I have to hand calculate mileage based on speed and fuel consumption.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •