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Thread: Sheep Gear Questions

  1. #1
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    Default Sheep Gear Questions

    My father is finally doing his lifelong dream of hunting sheep. He picked up a one week cancellation hunt in the Brooks Range from the end of August to the beginning of September. While he's busy panicking and getting in the best shape he can, I'm in charge of equipment. I've done a lot of backpacking with my jobs, but I know zilch when it comes to the real wilderness in Alaska. Right now I'm mostly worried about the pack and clothes. I've been reading a lot on here too and learned a lot. Here's what we've got together so far. If anyone has any feedback, it would be awesome.

    For a pack, I think we've decided on a 6500 mystery ranch pack. Am I crazy for going with an internal when compared to an external? He had back surgery about 15 years ago and while it's fine now, I want the best pack for his back.

    For a daypack, I have a mammut hike 35. I'm going to get a camo cover made for it as it's blue. Does that sound like a bad idea to anyone? It's a heavy pack, and more weight, but it's a comfy one for him.

    Clothing:

    So far, we own:
    Sitka's 90% jacket, Core top, Transverse top, Transverse bottom. He's thinking about getting either the 90% pants or the Ascent Pants.

    For raingear, I have a mountain hardwear shell (goretex xcr). I think it's a tenacity. I've been told you don't need camo for raingear. We're working on the pants.

    Boots are a bit of dilema. The only decent brands I can find for him to try on in a 200 mile radius are Asolo, Meindl, and Lowas. None of which will be the models we're actually looking at. We're going to try a bunch, but what about the Asolo 520s? They fit my feet well and my dad has the same kind of feet as me, so I think they might work. Would they be too low?
    I'm leaving out things I'm sure he's using.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Your fathers outfitter should be able to answer all the questions particularly for the Brooks range, and what they will provide and what he needs to bring. You should tag along...its an experience you won't forget.

  3. #3

    Default treking poles

    1) get those boots and get going on breaking them in.
    2) Have your dad try hiking with treking poles. They will reduce the amount of stress on his back and increase his hiking speed.
    3) two scopes both sighted in to that rifle.(remember that he is springing for a guided hunt so they can pack it.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  4. #4
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I have no idea what guides do for you on a hunt. How much of a load is he expected to pack? If it isn't his fair share, then he might not need a really great pack. I really like my Barney's pack. Some of the other packs I have seen at the sportsman's show just seem to be a bad design, but that might just be me.

    I think the Lowa GTX hunter (or something like that) is the best boot I have ever had. Very comfortable from the first day I tried them on and they have only gotten better with age. I think he would be pretty happy with this boot if it fits well, but that is the thing with boots, everyone has a different foot.

    I think, as stated above, the most important thing is to get into some boots now and start getting in shape.

  5. #5
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaboku68 View Post
    1) get those boots and get going on breaking them in.
    2) Have your dad try hiking with treking poles. They will reduce the amount of stress on his back and increase his hiking speed.
    3) two scopes both sighted in to that rifle.(remember that he is springing for a guided hunt so they can pack it.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas
    Great advice on the first two for sure! I would make the boots priority 1. You need plenty of time to break in a serious mountain boot. Scarpa Liskums, and Lowa Hunters would be a good start for boots. Hunters have 3/4 shanks which makes them more versitile with more give in the toe. Liskums are full shank which makes them better mountain boots. Internal frames for the most part aren't the best for packing really heavy loads especially when headed down hill/mountain. The frames tend to load out from the back with heavy loads making them awkward and causing falls. External frames and especially well built ones are unbeatable for really heavy loads. I didn't see anything about rain gear or really cold weather gear. You might consider Helly Hanson rain gear. Also Barney which was previously mentioned makes a brooks range and super cub jacket and pant that would fill the void of warm outer insulation while glassing and at camp.

    Brett

    PS. I would definitely talk to your outfitter, but it wouldn't hurt to give Barney's a call for advice. Barney's is Barney's Sports Chalet in Anchorage. I work there from time to time for the discounts and I think you will find they are pretty well thought of around this state. They are open tomorrow 10-5 and start Sunday hours this weekend 12-5.

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I personally prefer an internal frame for what he is likely to be doing. If he is going on a fuided hunt the I assume he will have a packer. If that is the case then his total weight shouldn't be so high that he needs an external frame. For the weights that he is likely to see I think he will be hard pressed to find a better pack than the Nice. Until loaded VERY heavy I find the internals much better, they fit better huging your body and don't tend to throw you off balance as easily. They are also easier to bust brush w/ though that isn't too likely to be a problem in much of the Brooks.

  7. #7
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    Lowa sheep hunter gtx boots. I used em on two sheep hunts and they are great. Although two hunts put a lot of wear and tear on em.
    I used a Kifaru longhunter (internal) on one hunt and a Barney's (external) on the other. Both were great packs, but I have also been researching and I think the pack you have chosen would be excellent.
    I have only used the sitka ascent pants, great gear though. Should have no issues there
    Talk to the guide and get a recommended packing list. For the money is costs to hire a guide, I am sure that they have most of the info on what they want you to bring and they do have the experience.
    Hope your dad kills a giant!!

    Do not forget good cameras for the photos. If this is a once in a lifetime hunt, you CAN NOT take too many pictures!!

  8. #8
    Member doogiehauz's Avatar
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    I absolutly love sitka gear! i own about every peice they make besides the new stuff. I think the nimbus set is absolutly awesome rain gear! Its so light and packable and you will not get wet. My buddy has the new cold front light which is pretty much the same as numbus but seems louder. I would advice the ascent pants any day over the 90% pants. The ascent pants are so light and breath very well and dry quickly, the 90% are too hot while hik'n. I went hik'n today for about 6 miles way above timberline and stalked a mountain goat to 200 yards. I only wore my sitka base layer/traverse layer/and nimbous outer layer. I was warm when hik'n when the wind was blowing and raining like crazy. I had a baclava and am waiting on my bell mont UL parka that only weighs 12.8 ounces and is warm as all get out. I was going to take my 90% jacket but another guy on this forum surgested the bellmont and i love the weight savings. Once i have that that will be the only layering system i take on my 10 day sheep hunt. I have the cabelas meindal boots and i love em! they are great! tough comfy boot, my buddy used kenetrek mountain boots and love them as well.

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default Don't forget the camera...

    Side note here. For the "trip of a lifetime" be sure he has a waterproof camera. I just put a new thread in the Photography forum with a review on waterproof cameras if you want to read up on the subject. I use them on float trips and they are worth their weight in gold. I have the Pentax Optio W30 and just the other day got a Optio W60 (current model) for my wife. These are small and easy to use. Very tough and of course waterproof. It is very small, like a pack of smokes, and packs easy. Keep it in a pocket close to his person in the daytime, in the foot of the sleeping bag at night. This will keep the battery strong. The cold weather depletes batteries quickly. B&H Photo/Video is best place to buy if you ask me. Any questions on the camera, don't hesitate to shoot me a pm. Links below...

    Camera...
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...al_Camera.html
    Case...
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc..._PVM_Case.html
    Memory card...
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...II_Secure.html




    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by doogiehauz View Post
    I was going to take my 90% jacket but another guy on this forum surgested the bellmont and i love the weight savings.
    Your welcome with putting you onto the Bellmont parka. You'll be very happy with that parka indeed. Much warmer for when you stop hiking to glass which is when you really need the warmth anyways. The 90% stuff just isn't that warm when stopped and still too warm when hiking. Even in the rain all you need is a waterproof shell and a base layer and you'll be warm generally down to freezing temps as long as you keep hiking. Stop to glass or rest and bust out the MB thermawrap Parka. Good luck on your hunt.

  11. #11
    Member doogiehauz's Avatar
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    Bellmont= awesome

  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    Your welcome with putting you onto the Bellmont parka. You'll be very happy with that parka indeed. Much warmer for when you stop hiking to glass which is when you really need the warmth anyways. The 90% stuff just isn't that warm when stopped and still too warm when hiking. Even in the rain all you need is a waterproof shell and a base layer and you'll be warm generally down to freezing temps as long as you keep hiking. Stop to glass or rest and bust out the MB thermawrap Parka. Good luck on your hunt.
    I still say this is the most well named jacket in their line. I find that it is completely useless 90% of the time!

  13. #13
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    I still cringe to think of what I paid for my Lowa Hunter Extremes, but boy do they fit.
    I think there is a reason almost everyone on this forum who has them raves about them. Seems like many have tried other options, and they end up with Lowas.
    As long as they fit YOUR type foot of course.
    Several have suggested the Lowa Tibets are a slightly lower, lighter version of the Hunters. Cheaper, too. That might be a good option for you...

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