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Thread: C&R Out of the water

  1. #1
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    Default C&R Out of the water

    What is out of the water? This is an interesting topic. I practice C&R. I use barbless hooks and do take pictures of fish with bellies and part of gills in the water. I believed this was a good practice. Then I am fishing and was informed by a tropper that the fish pictures we had taken "fish partially in the water" like described above were out of the water. He informed me the fish had to be entirely in the water.
    Now, if this is statement is true we had better watch if we lift the head out of the water to release the fish. I try to leave the fish entire in the water while releasing but I do get pictures of a few fish each year that are quality to me. This isn't evey fish just a chosen few.

    So my questions arise.

    What is considered "Removed from the water"?

  2. #2
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Exclamation the only opinion that matters...

    is that of the trooper. if he/she interprets your action as a violation, you get a ticket and can take the issue to court if you choose.
    opinions voiced on this forum are.. well... not worth much anywhere it counts
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    is that of the trooper. if he/she interprets your action as a violation, you get a ticket and can take the issue to court if you choose.
    opinions voiced on this forum are.. well... not worth much anywhere it counts
    Well said!!!!!!

  4. #4

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    Keep your catch in the water at all times. If you want to take a photograph, have the photographer get ready, then lift the fish barely out of the water (unless prohibited by regulation e.g. king salmon in Cook Inlet) and quickly return it to the water.

  5. #5

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    I don't consider the following three examples to be of fish that are "out of water". This is what I consider to be a legal following of the law, but at the same time, getting as close to a good of a shot as can be.

    Sometimes, you just don't get the shot.

    I got in 1 shot before this Kenai 'Bow slipped out of my hands and swam away:



    If you have to stay in your boat, you do the best you can without harming the fish or breaking the law. This fish is not out of the water, and while it's not a Grip N Grin that's going to be a magazine cover, it's enough to get an idea of what was caught. Again, this was the best I could do before letting this fish go.



    Then there are the times where the fish is landed in an ideal place to jump out and get wet with the fish. You think this fish is out of the water? Pretty good shot while following the rules on the Kenai.



    Taking a king out of the water isn't what is going to kill it. What kills your kings are the very act of fighting it on hook and line. The build up of lactic acid during a battle can be very fatal to a king. The best thing anyone can do is to get that fish back in to fast moving water so 02 enriched water can flow through it's gills. Fight your Kenai Kings hard. Put the screws to the fish and make that rod arc over and scream. So often I watched people just get abused by a Kenai King where little to no real rod pressure was being used. That's what truly hurts those kings.

    Have someone ready with the camera. Get your fish under control and snap off a couple of quick photos. Release the fish. All said and done in under 10 seconds.

  6. #6

    Default Excellent post

    Nice post parker.

    Well said....

    btw...nice fish!

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