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Thread: how many yards

  1. #1

    Default how many yards

    I have not shot a bow in years, but I was thinking of getting back into it again. Then I started watching a hunting show the other day and the guy shot an elk at 80 yards and said it ran 100 feet and died. If that is true, I was wondering about the regular hunter out there with all this high tech. gear,bows and long bows how far does the average person shoot and take big game.

  2. #2
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    Default This is Just Me

    I've been shooting my bow for a couple years now and I won't take a shot at ANY animal over 50 yards. There are just way to many variables when you get much further out than that. There are some people that would disagree with me but every shooter needs to know their own limits. Marc the FOB freak (you'll see posts on here from him) was talking about being able to shot something crazy like 80 yards or something with a 7" group. Now that's an impresive archer. I won't be doing that but if he can shoot that well then more power to him. But like I said, we all need to know our own limits. You have to keep in mind that an arrow is going to take a lot more time to hit it's target than a bullet will....and there are some many things that can happen in that time that can change your shot. A small twig that you didn't see 60 yards down range. The wind picks up for just half a second right after release. If you practice indoors it's WAY different than out in the field. When I first started out I worked really hard on 35-40 yard shots before I even considered moving up to 50. I still haven't taken a shot at an animal from that far yet but I practice every chance I get incase the time comes when I can't get that critter any closer than 50. Just remember to start small and get a lot of practice in, and don't move up in distance until you are confident with your shooting at the shorter distances. Just my 2 cents.

  3. #3
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Cool

    Didn't say I hunt at that range, but I did say it would be nice to be that guy who steps up and makes it happen like it was COOL. Sorta like a Clint Eastwood moment!

    What I do know is that my FOBs have given me a great boost of confidence and accuracy at the longer ranges. If you first have accuracy and confidence at longer ranges, then you may have that shot!

    Taylor

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  4. #4
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default

    Nighttime - forgot to throw an answer to your question. I've shot moose at 7, 45, 15, 50 and 21 yards, so the ranges will vary. I'd say that if you hunt caribou on the haul road, closer shots will be difficult to get, but not impossible. I'm with AkDiamond, KNOW YOUR LIMITS and stick firmly to them. As you become a better shot, extend your limits as necessary and prudent.

    Taylor

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    Default Clarification

    Hey Marc....all I meant by what I said was that I wish I could shoot like that....I probably won't be trying for years to come but 7" grouping at 80 yards.....that's crazy man.....let me know if you do ever get that shot. That's would be a story for the kids wouldn't it??!!!!

  6. #6
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default

    Hey, I'm no pro Archer. Just shoot some but love it alot.

    You too can shoot well, maybe you just haven't realized it yet? The right rig and set-up of that rig will do wonders along with alot of practice.

    Constantly working on form, consistency, and keeping gear up-to-date with the most accurate, not necessarily the latest available, is a good way to keep improving.

    Oh, and CHALLENGE yourself. Hence, the 80-yard pin! Like I said, I was just setting that up. Regularly guys and gals are shooting out to 100 in 3D events, so it's really nothing ground-breaking.

    Have a good season,

    Taylor

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  7. #7
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    Default 80 yds

    I'm in agreement with most of these posts but thought I'd get my 2cents in.In practice I regularly shoot to 90 yds with accuracy of about 12inch group. Hunting never over 70yds,and then it has to be in dead air. The long distance stuff really makes me work on form. Wind is the deciding factor on distance.Somedays a 40yd shot would be long up on the haul rd with the winds involved.Practice every windy day you can and learn your arrow flight.One last thought is that putting a 12inch 14oz b-stinger on my bow was the best distance piece of equipment Iv'e ever purchased! P.S I'm also getting 340 fps out of an 80 lb x-force with 420grn CX shafts that helps with the distance also
    Last edited by hodag 67; 07-15-2009 at 21:30. Reason: add too the end of this for accuracy

  8. #8

    Default

    Back when I carried a stick and a string, I never would thought of shooting past 30 yards myself. Just wondering how much stuff has changed.

    Theres a guy in michigan that shoots baby asprin out of the air with a long bow. There only about 8 yards in front of him so its a close shot. Hell if I dropped a baby asprin on the floor it takes me two minutes just to find it.

  9. #9
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    I have regularly competed at distances out to 80 yards with my bowhunter setup for the last 10 years. Frankly, I've missed enough 80 yard shots in competition (not practice) that I will never take a shot that long on an animal. A miss in competition is about 8" or so. 8" takes you out of the lungs on a caribou and makes a wounded animal really quick. The pressures of competition and hunting are very similar. I shoot MUCH better in practice, but the pressure takes away some of the accuracy when the chips are down.

    The beauty of practicing those long shots is that shorter shots become much easier chip shots. I haven't missed at 40 yards in so long that I can't remember doing it. My personal limit for hunting is 50 yards in dead air. If I can't get closer than that it wasn't meant to be.

    Those are personal limits for ME. I don't preach anymore. If you feel you can reliably kill out to 100 yards that's your business. If you feel you are limited to 20 yards I will not ridicule you. Everyone must set their own limits through experience.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    Default

    ...so many variables in any hunting scenario, as others have mentioned...-would be hard to make blanket generalizations, as far as range....
    -for me, it would depend a lot on:
    : the game I was hunting;
    : where it was located(terrain), how steep a grade, and what the animal was doing at the moment;
    :weather;
    :and the time of day-

    -even though I can get a pretty consistent decent group at 50, 60 and 70 yards in the backyard target, I personally don't feel comfortable with taking a shot in a hunting situation, over 35 yards-(except when hunting antelope in Wyoming; 40-60 yards seems to be the closest I can get to them, spot-and-stalk)

    -I always use a rangefinder; and always ask myself....am I sure of my shot placement?
    -will I be able to adequately be able to anticipate/see where my quarry takes off, and make a successful recovery?

    -bow poundage; matched with proper arrow selection and broadhead, as well as the bow being tuned properly would play a factor into effective kill range,limits, as well...-I am by no means an expert in this area, though...-would be neat to see a thread on that subject (might have been one in the past that I haven't seen)-


  11. #11

    Default

    I still shoot a stick and string and still limit myself to 30 yards....though I find most of my shots are 10 yards or less, many measured in feet not yards. Gotta love the part of bowhunting that leaves you getting CLOSE.

  12. #12
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Talking

    AkDiamond - If you've gone to the P.V. Forum, then you've seen me sitting bare-***** on a bucket.

    Now; if I made an 80-yard, center-punch kill shot, you'd think they were putting it in elementary school text books the way I'd let EVERYONE know!! Haah!!

    Sincerely,

    Your more humble, kinder, gentler Marc Taylor

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  13. #13

    Default

    I use to be an avid 30 yard and under shooter, even when practicing but now that've moved up to a more modern setup to include FOBS, i have stretched that out just a bit. Now I feel more comfortable out to 40 and will eventually hit the 50 yard mark. Will I ever hit the 70 or 80 yard mark? Probably not but one never know's their limitations until they try them and fail.

    I prefer all my shots to be as close as possible, afterall, isn't that what hunting is all about...

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    Default Absolutely

    That's why I gave up rifle hunting!!!!!

  15. #15

    Default just my thoughts

    AK Doug brought up a good point, competition drives the heart rate up, which is exactly what will happen when you are at full draw on a critter. I think competition scares people away because they will do bad---when in the end it will help them deal with that adrenalin rush when it hits them. I have come to realize it isnt my job to judge those that take longer shots than I, and I killed a bou at 60yds while he was walking with wind--- but I practiced 2 hours a day in all types of weather, and competed every chance that I got. Enough bad shots by archers will get hunts taken away from them like the archery only moose hunt in S Anchorage.

  16. #16

    Default

    You've got to specify whether you're shooting an arrow throwing machine or a bow. I've seen guys with compounds hit well enough at 60 or 70 yards to risk that on a live shot. For people who shoot bows, I've seen a couple people who could probably afford to risk a 50 yard field shot, but not many. 30 is a more realistic max, and I try to keep it less than that when the risk of wounding an animal is in play.

  17. #17
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    Default machine shooter..

    before I had to put it away due to injury..

    I could group broadheads under 10" @ 90 yards.

    Longest shot on game ever stands at a whopping 32 yards on my haul road caribou.

    Practice twice as far as you plan to kill and the confidence you build helps when the game is on the line.

  18. #18

    Default

    The question to ask is why do you want to bowhunt? Is your goal to see how far you can take an animal with a bow or is it your goal to see how close you can get to the animal? Yardage is the deciding factor in the equation between the desire to kill and the fear of wounding. Reckon it's a personal threshold. I carried a data book with my .308. Don't need one with my bow.

  19. #19
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    IBEP says no more than 30 yards and that's what I stick to. Not because I can't zero in arrows from further because I can, the reason is simple even at top compound speeds at 30 yards a animal can move far enough to put you out of the kill zone by the time the arrow reaches it. Seriously guys you might want to try getting a bit closer or switch to a gun.

    Nitetime that gentleman's name is Ron LaClair and he is one of my bow mentors. I saw him shoot the first time when I was about 5, for years I tried to make anything that flexed into a bow. If my father hadn't tried to force me into switching to a compound who knows where my skills would have been without a 20 year brake from archery.
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  20. #20
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Depends

    It all depends on my situation. The kill zone of the animal, weather, how confident I am feeling and the situation.

    I have taken 2 caribou at 50 yards, my only moose was at 26, and the farthest deer was 46 paces. But the conditions and shots were all justifiable.

    After taking my first moose last year, I don't think I would hesitate at a 50 yard shot with a kill zone that large. The 525 grain arrow released from the 72 pound BowTech blew right through. Same with the caribou. Complete pass throughs. I have confidence in the setup I am using.

    Now last year after rolling the F250 and totalling it I tore the shoulder up quite bad. I still went back to New York for a whitetail hunt but KNEW that 20 yards with my old Pearson Flame set to 55 pounds was my limit. I still passed on 2-3 deer that I did not feel physically confident to shoot at, all less than 20 yards. The shoulder and my confidence were just not into it. So pass.

    Soon it is time to get back in shape for the fall DM788 tag I will start practicing again. The BowTech is being professionally tuned as I had a bad experience with a local archery shop with a cable replacement last fall. Then back to 20 yards and start working out to 60 again.

    So confidence needs to be gained back and with the right conditions back to the woodlands for another moose.

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