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Thread: Tangle Lakes Suggestions and Gear

  1. #1

    Default Tangle Lakes Suggestions and Gear

    Hey all, Heading down the Denali Hwy this weekend (view should stink with all this smoke). I was hoping to try some fishing along the way and had heard about Tangle Lakes. It sounds like kind of a confusing area to get around what with the "tangle" of lakes so I was wondering if anyone had fished there and might give me some advice on where to head.

    I read the flyfishing for Grayling was good but I do not fly fish, I imagine like other places I will be okay spinning for those?

    Also I heard there are some big lake trout in the lakes but are hard to find. Does anyone have suggestions on tracking them down and, once I find them, what kind of gear (Pole & tackle) would you suggest for getting them in.

    Thanks for your help as always

  2. #2
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Access to canoe or boat?

    If not, it would be a fine opportunity to take up fly fishing....

    I know Grayling like small (size 0?) spinners, including Mepps. Lakers prefer to be deep after spring thaw. But, if you have a canoe or other boat, slow trolled flies or spinners I've heard will work sometimes for lake trout.

    I try to remember good-sized Grayling are old fish in a species that grows slowly and mostly keep them in the water when I can. Have a good trip. Here are some other threads possibly useful:

    bugs...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d.php?p=257271

    general and fishing...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d.php?p=527199

    lures...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=32614

    lures, bugs...Lodge for info...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=36908

    good tips from Blue Moose and others...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=15115

    general grayling stuff...some great pics...
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=30668

  3. #3
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Default

    I have caught many grayling on small spinners and spoons.
    My favorites here in the NWT are #2 or #3 gold or silver Blue Fox spinners or 1 1/4" to 1 3/4" spoons in fire tiger, potato bug (dark orange with black dots) and Luck Strike Half Waves (chrome/red and white) in the 1/5 ounce size. Contrary to popular belief you do not need to use 0 and 00 spinners for grayling as they are quite aggressive and wil take the larger offerings.
    I find that too often grayling will inhale the smaller sizes and end up getting gill hooked. If you are fishing an area where thegrayling are over 12" please use the larger baits and if in an area where they are smaller than 12" use #1 spinners and if you start to deeply hook the fish increase the size of your baits. It is pretty amazing to see how big a bait they can get their lips around!!!

  4. #4

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    To add, clip off at least one hook of the treble as these fish are very soft-mouthed and damage easily.

  5. #5
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Default


    These work well. I have caught grayling from 8-21 inchen on one and never deep hooked one.

    also small spinners with grub tails work well as do lead head jigs. Thay can be cast and retrieved or jigged with success. You can also use the jig under a bobber.

    also, with ultralight spin tackle, you can assemble a fishable nymphing rig. Using one of those bobbers that you can partially fill with water gives you some weight to cast and becomes your strike indicator. From there you assemble a typical nymph rig with shot above a tippet knot and 10-14" to the nymph. Line control is tricky.

    Or you could do a rig where the weight is on the end of your line and about 12-18" above you tie in a leader with a nymph on it. I forget the name of this rig but it works for nymphing with spinning gear.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Ill be up there friday fishing while my wife is working in Glenallen. I love to fish the Tangle River with a fly rod or spinning rod. I use 0 mepps or blue fox's. Pinch the barbs and cut one hook of. Where lower flows into upper is great fishing. Lots of 10 inchers. If you work down where the river flows into the upper I have caught some 14-16 inch grayling there. I use my fly rod with bead head princess nymphs or any black gnat pattern. I have also caught Lakers where the river dumps into the upper lake. I was fishing for grayling on my ultra light and a 0 mepps and caught a freaking 27inch lake trout. What a fight on 6lb test and a 4'6 ultra light
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  7. #7
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    Default Dont be afraid...

    1. to try a fly rod.. you may be surprised..

    2. to walk around the edge of the lakes.. get way from the normal "easy" spots. the fishing and the size only increase!!

    3. to scout some of the other creeks and ponds nearby. Swede Lake trail, Hongry hollow, Miers Lake, Rock Creek, 7 Mile Lake, Landmark Gap Lake AND creek to name a few. Some involve a bit of a hike, but MORE than worth it!

    4...to report back about how sore your arms are

  8. #8
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FairbanksBowHunter View Post
    1. to try a fly rod.. you may be surprised..

    2. to walk around the edge of the lakes.. get way from the normal "easy" spots. the fishing and the size only increase!!

    3. to scout some of the other creeks and ponds nearby. Swede Lake trail, Hongry hollow, Miers Lake, Rock Creek, 7 Mile Lake, Landmark Gap Lake AND creek to name a few. Some involve a bit of a hike, but MORE than worth it!

    4...to report back about how sore your arms are

    OMG I forgot about Rock Creek, Just a couple of miles past tangle river. Great call
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  9. #9
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    Default If only..

    my boy werent so sick, I would be headed out in that direction this weekend myself... Looks to be a fabulous interior weekend too!

  10. #10
    Member Albradley's Avatar
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    Default My favorite grayling fishery

    I would say try under the bridge or wade accross all three mouths and fish at the opening...there is a deep hole on the underside of the bank.I've pulled out lakers as well as an 18 inch beauty from there.Also try using a griffin gnat under a bobber.Its the best way to fish there by using a spinning rod with a bobber and a fly.simply perfect.anyways good luck

  11. #11
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    I've got to agree with FairbanksBowHunter. Take a fly rig with you as well as your spinning gear, you won't be sorry. Grayling are an absolute blast on a light fly rod. Don't get hung up on cost. Just go to Freddy's or Wal-Mart and buy one of the cheap Courtland (or similar) 5 or 6wt kits and a couple of extra 5x leaders and a dozen or so assorted #14 and #16 nymphs. If you aren't planning on eating the fish, press the barbs down, you'll still catch plenty. Naidine has flies for sale at Tangle River Lodge as well. (BTW, it's a great place to stay and eat!) Major word of caution: bring high-octane bug dope!

    My daughter and a friend and I fished Tangle River from the day use park just up the road from the campground a couple of years ago. We fished for about 3 or 4 hours in the morning then went back to the lodge for lunch and a nap. Came back after dinner and fished again until after 11pm. No joke, we were catching fish every third or fourth cast the whole time. I didn't keep track but I'd bet that the three of us caught and released well over 75 fish that day. A lot of them were small but we did get a lot in the 10 to 12 inch range and a few closer to 14 inches. My daughter had never fly fished before and had a cheap rod and reel and she did as well, or better, than my buddy and I did with our Orvis rigs.

    Now here's another option for you. Drive on down the road to the Maclaren River Lodge (another great place to stay and eat) and ask Alan, the owner, to take you up river into some of the tributary creeks with his flat bottom river boat (he doesn't charge much). He'll even drop you off with a canoe and you can float back to the lodge after your arms are sore from reeling in fish. You won't have to worry about sharing the stream with anybody either. My daughter bagged a really nice 15 incher up there with a short spinning rod and a Mepps.

    How ever you do it, you'll have fun. Wish I was going.

  12. #12

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    Thank you all for the suggestions. I'll be sure to report back when I get back!

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