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Thread: Game Bags for Dall Hunt

  1. #1

    Default Game Bags for Dall Hunt

    I am curious if flies are a problem on dall hunts and if it is a good idea to bring along a couple game bags for meat and capes? I would think flies could still be a problem the first 2 weeks in August?

  2. #2

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    I can't think of a reason NOT to take them, and yes you could have flies, leaves, sticks, rocks, gravel, etc. on the meat without them, and besides they make good pillows or good bandages.

  3. #3

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    I usually take one Tag bag for the meat. A second Tag bag would be nice to put the cape in...

  4. #4
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Game Bags

    jimss,

    ...just take four cheap white pillow cases. Three for the meat and one for the cape. I use three pillow cases for meat just to keep each bag light. Don't forget six pounds of salt for a shoulder mount. Fourteen pounds for a full body mount.

    I purchase pillow cases 20 at a time for fifty cents each at an Army Surplus store. It takes a few minutes to search through 'em to find newer, sturdy pillow cases without any holes. Although they appear clean I then wash 'em.

    Those big @ss black flies will ruin your unattended meat during an early season hunt if they can find even a 1/4 inch hole, or if you do not tie off the top of the bag. Those flies will also swarm under or along side a bag and lay millions of eggs directly on the meat bag if you are not vigilant. Where you will be, wink wink, their is ice about 1/2 + mile away. But there are also a lot of black bears in there. It would surprise me if you did not see a half dozen adults in a week. To keep meat closer to camp just dig out the river bank in a shady spot and put the meat on top of a plastic bag, so the meat bags do not soak up water. That glacial river is 36 degree coming out of the glacier, very near (1/4 +- mile) your camp. Figure out a way to keep the sun off of it, and the meat will be plenty cold.

    Note that the guys that camped last year, exactly where you will be dropped off, had most of their food raided by a black bear prior to opening day. Another hunter shot a ram opening day very near their camp and they actually went to the kill site and trimmed some remaining meat for their meals. They shot their own ram on hunt day #3 so then they had plenty of meat for the hike-out.

    My client hunter and I bumped into them at the Anch F&G office, both of us sealing rams from that wonderful sheep country. Then a week later, I bumped into them again way up north, almost to Deadhorse, on the haul road. Strange Alaska.

    Dennis
    AK TAGS

  5. #5

    Default Tag bags

    I would go with the tag bags, they are lighter than pillow cases, and breath better... I bought a set of 5 w/ carrying case. Doesnt take up much space and are light....

    You can look at them at www.pristineventures.com by Larry Barlett

    James

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bohntr21 View Post
    I would go with the tag bags, they are lighter than pillow cases, and breath better... I bought a set of 5 w/ carrying case. Doesnt take up much space and are light....

    You can look at them at www.pristineventures.com by Larry Barlett

    James
    This is what I carry as well. I purchased them at the Archers Den in Eagle River last year which is a great place to do business!

  7. #7

    Default I like them but I am too cheap.

    I think that tag bags are probably the way to go.

    I have been using those polystrene feed bags. They are about 3 bucks per at Alaska Feed and Seed in Fairbanks. They work very well, breath and are lighter than pillow cases.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  8. #8
    Member sheep man's Avatar
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    Guys and gals save your money and go with the pillow cases,i've been using then since 1978 never had a problem,i even use them for other critters, neck meat bag for moose and caribou....
    I ♥ Big Sheep

  9. #9

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    I got my bags from kifaru they are very light and distribute the weight well.

  10. #10

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    I've never seen a pillow case big enough that I could fit a moose hind quarter in, with the TAG bags you can fit the biggest of quarters in and still be able to close it without bone sticking out. I've got the sheep/caribou bags and the moose bags, they are worth every penny.

  11. #11
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default Quarters

    AKHunter45,
    The original thread question concerned sheep meat.
    Moose quarters? I , for one, do not intentionally carry bone very far, ever, anymore.

    I just purchased 22 more cheap pillow cases. I'm good for the next 5 or 6 sheep in the next couple of years. The last 27 tasted fine being packed in pillow cases.

    jimss...Don't overthink the game bag deal. Any tight-weave, sturdy bag that keeps dirt off the meat and flys out of the bag will do fine. Keep the sheep meat clean and cool. Bring a tiny frying pan. Enjoy lightening your load at every meal.

    Dennis
    Alaska True Adventure Guide Service

  12. #12

    Default Glacier?

    I am curious if anyone has dug a hole in a glacier to store sheep for extended length of time? I would imagine it would remain cold. I usually don't use plastic garbage bags because they usually create a great micro-environment for bacteria but am wondering if game bags or possibly plastic bags would be best if buried in a glacier? I also believe I have heard of guys putting meat in garbage bags and placing them in a cold river?

  13. #13
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default

    I always carry two large garbage bags on any hunt. Nice to put the game bag in the plastic and then in the pack. Obviously no game goes into plastic bags for any extended period of time due to spoilage. Intrigued by the idea of meat in plastic bag then in the river.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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  14. #14
    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Default Pillow cases and sheets

    I've been using pillow cases and sheets for years. I pick them up for nothing at garage sales or whereever, and just bleach them out after the season. The sheets work great on moose or Raspberry elk quarters, or anything really. They are lightweight, and as noted, work great for pillows, even after you have meat in them!
    Experience Real Alaska! www.alpinecreeklodge.com

  15. #15

    Default I've NEVER used them..

    used game bags on sheep. I have always gotten the meat down to the creek and then found some shallow water to place the bags in. I open the tops of the plastic bags and let the meat cool off over night. The next day, I try to get all the air out, tie up the bag, place in another bag, tie off, and then in another bag and tie off. Then it goes back into the creek in deeper water. HAVE never lost any meat or had spoilage. Had meat in the water for 6 days once.

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