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Thread: Need help curing salmon eggs

  1. #1
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    Default Need help curing salmon eggs

    I'm using Pro-cure and having problems with the eggs disolving and turning to a soupy mush. I cut the eggs into bait sizes, then sprinkled the dry cure on them. After an hour or so, I dropped them into zip lock bags and put them in the fridge for a couple of days turning them twice a day. I then froze the eggs in the zip lock bags. After thawing this year, they work fine the first day but then turn to mush after that. Do I need to put them in the refridgerator at the end of each day? Is there something wrong with my process? Any advice will be appreciated. Thanks

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    I've only tried curing eggs once and they didn't turn out so hot, will try again soon. I'm going to try it as per this video next go 'round.

    http://community.adn.com/mini_apps/v...959457&GID=118

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I'm just guessing, but if they didn't dry out a bit and form a bit of a skin on the eggs, I'd suspect when you froze the eggs the moisture expanded and burst the skins of the eggs.

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    Default When I cure mine

    I do as you did with the curing process, once they are cured I stick them in the freezer until next year. When I take them out of the freezer, I put the eggs on a rack in the sun to dry out. After the are really dry(almost too dry to use) I put them back into the container that has the thawed out "cure juice". While I'm out fishing with them I just make sure they stay out of direct sunlight. I even leave a package in my truck(double bagged) in case I go fishing spur of the moment. They always stay firm this way and I haven't had them turn to mush yet(been doing it this way for 9 years).

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    We always used Borax, we would get a quart size canning jar and fill it 1/2 to 3/4 with eggs then pour in borax, put the lid on and roll the jar around to mix it up. Freeze them for up to a year defrost and tie in wedding vale. The eggs have a mushy coating over them but they are firm and hold up well.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I cure the eggs in a salt and brown sugar mixture for a few hours after they have been cut into chunks, till they have a hard texture. Then layer in Borax and freeze. No problems so far. The brown sugar gives it a darker red appearance.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    If you need to toughen them uplike to sprinkle a little boraxo on them
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

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    You have a pretty good process in curing the eggs. Only a couple of tweeks and you should be in the money. After you get the eggs cured put them on paper towels or on a rack of some sort to dry out. Once the eggs are to your liking package them up and put in the freezer, for next year or next month, or the fridge if you will be using them in the next week or so.

    After you are done fishing for the day get them on ice or back into the fridge. THe cold will slow down the curing process. As soon as the eggs warm up they start curing and will turn to mush. WHile you are out fishing try to keep your eggs in a shade cool place. Hope this helps

    KLICKMAN

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    My wife does our eggs using pro cure as well. Rather than cut them up and brine them she puts whole skeins in the bucket or bowl and soaks them (mixing occasionally) for a couple hours outside, longer if its cool. Then she lays them out on a piece of chicken wire attached to a couple 2x2's layed out on sawhorses. They are left to cure at least overnight, longer if its been cool and damp. Check them just like you would when smoking fish. Once cured you can cut them up and bag them to your liking. Vacuum pack them if you can.

    Be sure to prop up a piece of plywood over the eggs to keep them out of the sun and prevent birds from getting to them.

  10. #10
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    I also like to keep mine in a plastic mayonnaise jar to keep from crushing them. I have done some experimentation and learned that a glass jar wil break 100% of the time when I drop them on rocks.
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  11. #11

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    I prefer jello and salt for mine.

  12. #12

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    I just use plain salt and borax (20 mule team) mixed 50-50 sprinkle on being sure to get between the layers of eggs (leaving them whole), then drying overnight or until nice and firm, then put in zip-lock bags and store in fridge or freezer.

  13. #13

    Default Egg curing

    There is an interesting and detailed egg preservation process described at www.ifish.net
    Scroll down to the featured pages (right hand column) to Scott Ameraran.
    I have never tried his product

  14. #14
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moose-head View Post
    I also like to keep mine in a plastic mayonnaise jar to keep from crushing them. I have done some experimentation and learned that a glass jar wil break 100% of the time when I drop them on rocks.



    Might I add that if you are fishing with eggs around rip rap, or from atop
    any type of boulders, do not use a cheap graphite spinning reel. If you slip on the rip rap, lose your balance and drop your reel, it will more than likely break...then you won't have to worry whether your eggs were perfectly cured or sunny-side up! (I learned the hard way fishing the slippery jetties in Texas.) Use only metal/alum reels!)

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    All great info for your problum, borax is a great tool for toughing up your eggs. when I freeze my eggs I like to put them in the freezer for a couple hours to harden up than I wrap them in paper towl and vacum seal them. if you are using a vacum sealer than puting them in the freezer first will prevent them from getting crushed, works great for me

  16. #16
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    what i do for my eggs is
    1) cut em up and lay em out on cardboard......
    2) take a good sized jar, 2 qt or so and put em in there till the jar is about 1/2 full
    3) throw in some salt, brown sugar and just a bit of colored borax
    4) shake em up super good
    5) lay em back out on the cardboard and sprinkle em up with salt to keep the flies off and dry em up a bit....flip em after about 15-25 minutes and salt em again lightly until they dont leak everywhere anymore but just a bit of juiciness to them to the touch...sun em or salt em too much and you mite as well use em for single salmon eggs or fly bait....gotta pay a little attention to them when its this kind of weather

    i can do this and have good holding, excellent fish producing roe within 4 or 5 hours, though i like to do it overnite.
    if ANYONE has doubts on this recipe.....come and try some on your favorite stream: you wont be disappointed.

    my buddy that used to be a guide on the little susitna and several other susitna river streams showed this process...it has worked great for me and my family and friends. holds up well, plenty of scent, good color after soaking...it really does work quite well.

    good luck and i hope this works for you if you decide to try it

  17. #17
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    Default egg cure

    JTall, you have received some good info... here is something else you should try, take the whole egg skein and break up the membrane that holds the eggs intact...with that done, you now will have individual rows of eggs that you will apply your cure to... make sure that you put the cure in every crevice and on every individual egg all the way down to the skein...put the skeins in a jar or bucket, so when the juice is formed it totally saturates and covers the skein. I like to leave my eggs in a cool/dark location, and I let them rehydrate (soak some of the juice back into the eggs).Now take them out with some gloves and place on a screen out of the sun, preferably in a cool wind (a fan works great). When using your eggs on a fishing trip, bring a small cooler with an ice pack or ice to keep your eggs cold and firm. I hope this helps.

    D Ray

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