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Thread: leafy above, nothing below

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    Default leafy above, nothing below

    This is my first time gardening in Alaska (I'm in Anchorage). I started everything from seed in the middle of May. It all came up but some of it is doing weird things. The only veggies that are a success are anything that grows above ground: lettuce, peas. All of the root veggies (radishes, beets, turnips, onions) are huge and leafy above the ground but not growing at all below. Its gotten so bad that the radishes are woody stalks with no roots. Does anyone know where I went wrong? I started pulling stuff up and replanting...maybe I just started too early?

    Everything has close to full sun, lots of water and Miracle Gro.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    heck it is all young yet... pick it in September... most seeds are started in march up here. in a green house... the garden is planted AFTER memorial day.. and harvested at frost time...

    things grow quick here.. roots in cold soil take a little longer to mature. next year put in raised beds. you will do much better...
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    "Everything has close to full sun, lots of water and Miracle Gro."

    Try a Miracle Gro with less nitrogen. That is the first number in the set of three. I read that part somewhere (I think in AK Garden Guide)

    I just yanked up my disappointing dime sized bolting radishes and started another batch. Mine kept drying out in the heat of the day no matter how much I watered them - the roots just stopped growing. I just learned some of this info from an 81 year old former turnip farmer.

    He also said keep them well watered but not soaked. Try not to let them dry out I guess. Wish you luck!

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    A decent amount of bone meal put down prior to planting will help to produce some better roots. Radishes, beets and similar roots dont really need to be started indoors, they all grow very quickly. I would leave them in and see what happens, if they start to flower then they are done (you wont get them to develop good roots).

  5. #5

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    It may have something to do with the composition of your soil. A lot of the soil in Anchorage appears dark and rich, but it contains a lot of clay. You can tell if your soil contains a lot of clay by squeezing a handful; if it stays in a ball, you probably have a lot of clay in the soil. This type of soil is dense and heavy, which isn't as good for growing root crops as sandy or lighter soil. What I have done to fix this is add a bunch of compost to the soil to lighten it up. I know that Walmart was selling bags of wood and manure compost for just a few bucks a bag, and it was actually pretty good stuff. Not sure if they still have it, though. You could probably work some into the soil now, re-plant, and still get some good crops this year, as long as this weather holds out.

    Good luck!

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    Leave every thing but the radishes. I am guessing your radishes are flowering. Check the type of radishes. If you planted a longer season radish (50 days) the the long days will cause them to flower early. If you have a short season radish (30 day), then you may want to check your soil. If you want to grow long season radishes plant them now when the days are getting shorter and they should do better.

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    I put in a raised garden this year and amended the top 6" of soil with compost and a bit of aged steer manure ...And my beets grew crazy-fast, growing huge leafy tops on them, and nothing below ...Then suddenly the beets started forming and are getting so big that they are pushing well out of the ground at the surface. I've been scooping dirt up around the beets themselves, not sure if it's the right thing to do or not. I guess I could harvest them any time, but I'm waiting to see what happens... It's a first for me for growing beets.

    Brian

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    whhhheeeeew ... I thought this thread was about my ex. wife..

    continue on..

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

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    It is not nessecery to cover the tops of your beets, but I doubt it will harm any thing. I would let them grow till fall or they start to bolt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tananaBrian View Post
    I put in a raised garden this year and amended the top 6" of soil with compost and a bit of aged steer manure ...And my beets grew crazy-fast, growing huge leafy tops on them, and nothing below ...Then suddenly the beets started forming and are getting so big that they are pushing well out of the ground at the surface. I've been scooping dirt up around the beets themselves, not sure if it's the right thing to do or not. I guess I could harvest them any time, but I'm waiting to see what happens... It's a first for me for growing beets.

    Brian
    I got some beet greens earlier this week and they were good. The small beets that they had attached were some of the tastiest that I have ever had. I say pick a few here and there as you need them and then when you have time to preserve them start putting them up.
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  11. #11

    Default Compost Tea &...

    ...rabbit manure, especially the latter has worked great for us this year. We have been adding to the beds since May 1st. I actually started planting early this year and we've harvested nice sized beets & cauliflower & broccoli & chard.

    Since it's kind of messy to add the manure once the plants are out, I make a "poop soup" by soaking them in water with banana peels for a week and then pour the water around the roots of everything. Ok, it is not the most delectable thing to be around but again, the plants love it.
    Last edited by kww; 07-29-2009 at 13:08. Reason: sp

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