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Thread: how much is enough?

  1. #1
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default how much is enough?

    okay so this is a new thing for me... i was approached the other day... about a few Creeks and rivers... i have asked and no body seems to know...

    HOW much water is not enough to float? ankle deep? knee deep? how much is TO MUCH?

    what do you guys look for when setting your sites on a new river? how much elevation drop is too much?

    i hear about having to tow your boat on the sag when the level is down... how deep is that water?


    now the $6,000,000 questions.... has any one floated California creek to the totat or the totat... from the CUA line to the tanana?

    i know there is a canyon there. to deal with... so how about putting in on the Rex and doing the flat lands? and getting out in Nenana....

    who has floated the Nenana from Healy to Nenana? i keep hearing about guys that tried in canoes. and regret ever tryiing...

    I imagine a spring grayling trip down the Totat would be a worth while adventure.. if nothing else... a good feed for the skeeters the Nenana has tons of fishing to be had... just need to access the small feeder streams for it...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  2. #2

    Default water?

    Well Mr. Vince- For the first part of your questions-- How much water is directly proportioned to the weight in the raft. If you have a urethane raft, not much water is required as it slides over rocks, different than rubber boats. The larger the tubes the more weight you can carry, not to sound too simple. My thought is to take what ever kind of boat you have out and give her a try!! Only she knows for sure!!!
    Safe boating
    Goo

  3. #3
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default

    Goo, don't forget to add in the weight of the raft and rigging too! Nice thing about your boats (SOTAR) is the light weight compared to other boats in the same size class.

    Vince- tough question. Ideally "enough water"is at least a foot under the hull. Even one foot is a bit on the shallow side, because it doesn't allow a good bite with the oars (you'll chew up your blades on the bottom, have little control and make enough noise to scare all the game out of the country). For that you really need at least 18-24 inches. As far as how shallow is too shallow, it depends on the factors Goo listed. It also depends on whether you're in an inflatable canoe, a round boat, a self-bailer, a cataraft or a non-bailer, each of which handles weight differently. The canoes are skinny and are going to sit deeper. A cataraft has no floor and sits deeper. A self bailer floor floods out when it is pushed down to where the top of the floor is lower than the surface of the river. All in all, a non-bailing round boat (conventional floor) has the best displacement of any inflatable in its size class.

    Let the river choose the boat, and look for a foot or more between the boat and the riverbed.

    The only time I've seen "too much water" is when the river overflowed its banks and washed out the campsites, or made it impossible to find the main channel. At that point you're pretty much done hunting and are just getting through the country though...

    Hope it helps.

    -Mike
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  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    thanks mike right there is what i was looking for..

    now.. elevation drop...

    i know. that the steeper the drop the faster the run.north little su... as a kid taught me plenty...

    i guess that is what i was asking for as TOO MUCH water.... at what point does it become rapids. vrs fast current...keep in mind i have run many boats and barges up and down our rivers....i can stick an acer of steel.. in a tight corner... but have little idea of by hand.

    my questions come from, as i stated other questions raised to me.... and the tentative desire to start along this line... and take my kids with me.

    me? i have Swam most the Nenana canyon ... ( as a younger man) it was not uncommon for me to back flip out of one of Nenana raft co... boats after the bridge in the Denali run, and swim to Healy( always with Johns and Rowers consent)...but would not PERSONALLY take my kids through it...not with out having done several times alone....

    not sure about the float hunting... not yet... but am interested in taking time out to go float for fun... and camp where i normally can not reach...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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