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Thread: Flip Lines

  1. #1
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    Default Flip Lines

    The thread about unintentional swims got me thinking about flip lines. Do any of you that do occasional whitewater trips carry or wear flip lines? And, is it even possible to flip a boat back over that's equipped with an good size oar frame and still has a fair amont of gear still strapped in? I'm guessing in the latter case that the boat will either have to be swum, paddled, or lined back to shore and then flipped back over. I've seen empty paddle rafts flipped back over, but that's a completely different animal than an oar raft rigged for a multi-day trip.

    On the few guided whitewater trips I've done here in AK and Outside I think most of the guides wore snug fitting flip lines made of webbing and a couple of carabiners vs. the clip to the raft types like NRS sells. http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...815&deptid=961
    I'm assuming the advantage is that the flip line is with you instead of somewhere underwater on the boat or pulled off and floating downriver.

    If you were to make a flip lne from webbing aproximately how much would you need?

  2. #2
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    Default Flip lines

    If you don't have them in whitewater you are insane.
    Yes, oar rigs can and have been flipped back over with multi-day gear, it takes four people when they are heavy though.

    We used to use two 9 foot straps, just buckle them around the frame and tie a bunch of slip knots with a terminal knot at the end, and when you need them just untie, pull and your ready to go. NRS flip lines in a bag are a lot neater looking, but serve the same purpose. Stand on the opposite side of the boat and pull like hell!! It is good to try it in deep water and be on the upstream side when it comes over, it would suck to end up on the downstream side in shallow water and have a loaded raft put you between the bottom of the river and itself, and a death sentence if it parked there.

    Chris

  3. #3
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    Two 200-ish pound guys have a surprising amount of leverage when hangin on a rope off the far side of a raft. I've flipped a few boats moderately loaded and was surprised at how easy they come over.

    This is one of the reasons I wear a helmet as a rafter when doing WW. Unlike a kayaker who is more likely to get hit by a rock. My concern is in re-flipping the boat is to get tagged by one of my oars as the raft is righted (assuming they are still connected with the oar leash)

    I have a set of the NRS flip line bags that I can move from raft to raft, and the NRS throwbag belt has a flip line in it too iirc.

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    The few times I've used flip lines I found that the boat can hit you pretty hard if you don't get your face out of the way.

    To use them you need a section of fairly calm water after whatever flipped you. Most of the time you are better off looking for a gravel bar to beach it on.

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