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Thread: Muzzlebrake vs. Porting

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    Default Muzzlebrake vs. Porting

    Fishook was so kind as to let me use his login.

    I recently bought a 300 WSM. Would is better to have a muzzlebrake put on it or to have it ported so it does not kick as much? What are the pros or cons of each? Which is cheaper?

    Thank you!

  2. #2

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    I had a muzzle brake put on my 300 wsm for shooting at the range. I also had a thread protector made so that I can hunt without the muzzle brake. My point of impact did not change with or without the brake.

    I really like this set up.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    here in FBK... porting is 175... is always on the gun. and i think it is a nicer finish.

    brakes can be removed. especially when your hanging with the venomous types that are going to tell you to buy a smaller gun...rather then port it..

    brake on a shorter barrel vs porting i would go with the break. i had a Ruger 308 done for one of the kids a few years back... it was never the same. in fact it was the first time i missed the barn......


    all in all i like porting mine. taming that barrel make it so much more a joy to shoot. wear good ear muffs always.... be respectful of others at the range. cause some will give you dirty looks cause they don't wear muffs like they should... but the fact remains that you did not make it louder. you just changed the direction it goes.... so theirs is hurting as much as yours they just don't realize it...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishook View Post
    Fishook was so kind as to let me use his login.

    I recently bought a 300 WSM. Would is better to have a muzzlebrake put on it or to have it ported so it does not kick as much? What are the pros or cons of each? Which is cheaper?

    Thank you!
    Friend of Fishook,

    Cinsider this. How do others of lesser stature ever shoot high powered rifles accurately. It is proper conditioning and technique and nothing more. Toughen up. If it doesn't have a good recoil, add one, other than that, get some good instruction and do 100 push-ups each day. Make a place for that rifle to punch, rise to the challenge. This will cost nothing except I charge $100 for the advice.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Friend of Fishook,

    Cinsider this. How do others of lesser stature ever shoot high powered rifles accurately. It is proper conditioning and technique and nothing more. Toughen up. If it doesn't have a good recoil, add one, other than that, get some good instruction and do 100 push-ups each day. Make a place for that rifle to punch, rise to the challenge. This will cost nothing except I charge $100 for the advice.
    I agree with Murphy on this one. Physical conditioning will help, but recoil is primarily technique and mental disposition. This past weekend I took some friends shooting, several for the first time. I started them with 22 LR of various persuasions and beyond strictly enforcing safety I provided only general instructions on shooting. I also had several more experienced shooters and took a few "bigger" guns for them to try. Among the "bigger" guns I brought my .416 Remington Magnum. Its a Model 70 with a wood stock (+ a Decelerator pad) and a 1.5X5 Leupold in Conetrol bases & rings. The rifle weighs right at 9 & 1/4 pounds loaded. A young lady (less than 135 pounds) shot this rifle several times offhand and hit her target each time. I can't say she is a sharpshooter, but she has good technique/form and while the rifle did move her a bit, she was not at all bothered by the recoil. By saying she was not bothered by the recoil I mean she would not hesitate shooting the rifle again, though I doubt she would care to shoot it more than 10 or so times in one session.

    I am not saying that she is tougher than you are, not at all. What I am saying is what Murphy said, improve your technique, improve your mental state on recoil, get in a bit better condition and learn to shoot without a brake. Use the money you save to buy more ammo and you'll become even a better shot than you already are without increasing the perceived muzzle blast to you or bystanders.

    If you are not used to shooting your 300 WSM, you may need to warm up to it. I mean shoot it 5-10 times on each outing for 2-3 outings and then increase the number of rounds per outing until you can comfortably shoot your rifle. I'd say anyone sitting down for the first time to shoot a 300 magnum 20-30 times is going to be bothered by the recoil initially. Recoil, like a fine wine, is an acquired taste. Just be careful that in developing a taste for it you do not develop a bad habit (a flinch) in the process.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    cause some will give you dirty looks cause they don't wear muffs like they should...
    Doesn't matter, even with ear muffs it's painfull. Last time I was at the range a guy sitting about 20 feet away was shooting his rifle with a brake. Every time he pulled the trigger I felt the blast, made me jump right out of my seat, and I was wearing good ear protection. His shooting made me develop a flinch, shooting my .300-win mag (without a brake) was pleasant compared to that.

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    When I go to the range, I always bring earplugs and ear muffs. I am always glad to have both on whe someone sits next to me with a 30-378 with a muzzle break.

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    Generally, I would advise to go with the brake. They are removeable if you don't like it, and do not shorten the effective length of the barrel. Also they do not leave a questionable crown. Mag- na -port is a different story. but thats for another thread. Noise is noise, wear hearing protection. There is only hearing loss, not hearing gain. Good luck! GUNBUGS

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    Iím no doctor but here are some sad facts to think about that my doctor told me.
    Any sound over 100db will cause hearing loss for the rest of oneís life.
    Short blasts of sound do more damage than a constant sound.

    The ear can better protect itself from constant sounds so they do less damage than intermittent blasts of sound like a gunshot. It does not take much to make a 100db pulse of ear killing sound! A 20 ounce framing hammer striking a 16 penny nail in a 2X4 makes an average 120db of intermittent sound and will ruin the userís high pitch hearing surprisingly fast.

    There is very little difference between the long term damage done by a 110db sound or a 300db sound. The 300db will give you a bad short term ring or even make you vomit and the short effects of the 110db are about nothing, but the long term loss off hearing is about the same. In truth the 110db is far more detrimental to most people (especially us Ďtoughí men) since most donít respect or understand the long term damage itís doing and wonít do anything to protect their ears from it.

    I use hearing protection for any and every shot now, even little .22s! With the options we have now I see no reason not to use ear protection . . . yes, even when Iím hunting. I hear much better with my Game Ears in than without and wish I had used them or something from the start.
    Andy
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    I am no expert, but as an artilleryman i have a pretty good relationship with muzzle blast. If you have ever stood directly to the side of a muzzle brake attached to something that is capable of hurling a 68lb projecitle over 12 miles you know what I'm talking about.
    I think that it is the overpressure in conjunction with the recoil that really gets most people, and just turns into a mental issue. My approach is a good recoil pad and I also have a PAST shoulder pad, and plugs with muffs(and if you are shooting something with a brake, open your mouth while you shoot- it will equalize the pressure between your ears and throat). Once you get used to the recoil with all of that stuff, it doesnt seem so bad and you can loose the shoulder pad. Also a good .22 and a brick of ammo will do wonders if you develop a flinch too.

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    Default Pachy decellerator or simms pad &....

    work your way up to shooting full tilt loads.... If you don't reload, invest in a PAST pad and limit yourself to 3 rounds until you've run at least 2 boxes though it. THen do a couple more boces @ no more than 5 rounds a day. work your way into it a little at a time and you won't have an issue with the recoil. AND you have the added benefit of being forced to "learn" your rifle.

    15+ years and 15,000+ rounds down the tube of my 338 WM has made us very familiar.... I actually had to replace my decellerator pad a few years ago because I just plain wore it out.... gave me an excuse to try the simms pad. I like it even better than the decellerator... wonder what will be new when I wear it out..... only have about 10 years to wait if it lasts as long as the decellerator did.

    IMO brakes should be a last resort in the effort to tame recoil. IMO porting should be used only to tame muzzle jump..... that's my 2 cents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishook View Post
    Fishook was so kind as to let me use his login.

    I recently bought a 300 WSM. Would is better to have a muzzlebrake put on it or to have it ported so it does not kick as much? What are the pros or cons of each? Which is cheaper?

    Thank you!
    Kim you can use my login anytime youíre so funny and cheap. I like Murphy advice Toughen up kid 100 push-ups should do it ha ha. What are you going to kill with that 300? As you know I know nothing about guns. So go by some line and a reel & we will make it fish. Take Care.

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    Thank you all for your two cents worth. Much appreciated.

    Yep, it probably would not hurt any to be doing 100 push ups a day, but then I would have bigger guns than Fishook. As long as it doesn't kick any more than the 50 cal, I think I will manage just fine.

    I have an old 30-06 with a muzzle break on it. It was like that when I got it. I just got the 300 WSM and have not even fired a round through it yet. I plan on taking it out to get a caribou this fall. I am a young woman and I was curious if I would be able to handle the gun as is and how much recoil a break or porting would take out.

    No Fishook, I've got all the fishing tackle I need, thanks anyway!

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    I would shoot it off hand for the first couple shots. The ability for your body to roll back easily will reduce the felt recoil.

    I disagree with the comment that mag-na-porting is not relevant to this topic. I think it is completely relevant. The thing I like least about dealing with recoil is muzzle jump. I don't mind the hit in the shoulder most of the time. My issue is that as the rifle barrel comes up the scope pivots back toward my brow. I found that my Leupold rifleman scope did not give me the eye relief that I needed with my 325 and would graze my brow with every shot off the bench if I had the magnification cranked up. I ended up slapping a Zeiss Conquest 3x9 which has the same 4" of eye relief at all settings to solve my problem. I think that the Mag-na-port would have been another great solution. I also like that it keeps your rifle from coming too far off target so you don't lose sight of the animal. If you can shoot it withough pain but want to tame the muzzle jump then this may be just the ticket!

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